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Anne Cameron Collins papers, 1849-1909.

October 12, 2009 Leave a comment Go to comments

Creator: Collins, Anne Cameron, 1842-1915.
Collection number: 3838
View finding aid.

Abstract: Anne Cameron Collins, daughter of Paul Carrington Cameron (1808-1891) and Anne (Ruffin) Cameron (d. 1897), of Hillsborough, N.C.; wife of George Pumpelly Collins (1835-1903), plantation manager in Tunica County, Miss. Personal and family letters received by Anne (Cameron) Collins of Hillsborough, N.C., especially from her husband, George P. Collins, while he was away from home managing plantations in Tunica County, Miss., and as a businessman in Durham, N.C., from the late 1870s through the late 1890s. There are also many letters from the Collins’s seven children, including Annie Cameron (Collins) Wall (1862-1942), Rebecca Anderson (Collins) Wood (1864-1921), George William Kent Collins (1869-1946), Henrietta Page Collins (1870-1955),Mary Arthur (Collins) Woods (1872-1952), Alice Ruffin (Collins) Mebane (1874-1958), and Paul Cameron Collins (1877-1961); and correspondence with Cameron and Collins relatives, including Bennehan Cameron (1854-1925), Mildred Coles Cameron (1820-1881), and Arthur Collins. Also included are letters from friends, including Carrie Sargent of Bryn Mawr, Pa.There are only two items prior to 1865. The correspondence deals primarily with family concerns and includes letters from children attending St. Mary’s School, 1870-1882 and late 1880s, and the Raleigh Male Academy, 1883-1884, both in Raleigh, N.C., and the University of North Carolina, 1897, and also provides information concerning George P. Collins’s business affairs and economic and social conditions in Mississippi during Reconstruction.

Repository: Southern Historical Collection

Collection Highlights: A 6 January 1872 letter to Annie Cameron Collins from George Collins describes conditions in Mississippi after Reconstruction, and the disdain for the “free negroes” in the city.

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