Home > 19th Century, Digital Material, Florida, Insurrections, Plantations, Politics, Race Relations, Reconstruction, Slavery > Edward M. L’Engle papers, 1834-1907 (bulk 1834-1900).

Edward M. L’Engle papers, 1834-1907 (bulk 1834-1900).

October 12, 2009 Leave a comment Go to comments

Creator: L’Engle, Edward M.
Collection number: 425
View finding aid.

Abstract: Edward McCrady L’Engle (1834-1900) of Florida was a railroad president, lawyer, and Confederate army officer. L’Engle’s legal, business, political, and family correspondence, chiefly 1856-1897. Papers before 1866, a small part of the collection, relate to railroad development, plantation life and slavery, social conditions, and public opinion before and during the war in Florida. Antebellum papers include letters from other southeastern states and from an army officer on the Texas frontier and in the Oregon and Washington territories.Postwar papers chiefly concern the Florida Central Railroad, which was entangled in the Reconstruction manipulations of George William Swepson and general Milton Smith Littlefield. The postwar papers also relfect L’Engle’s legal practice, banking, and business activities in general, including relations with northern businessmen, and contain material on the political opinions of the conservative white element in Florida during Reconstruction. Correspondents include most of the antebellum, Confederate and Conservative leaders of the state, many of whom were L’Engle’s relatives or close friends, and a number of prominent persons from other southern states.

Repository: Southern Historical Collection

Collection Highlights: Papers dated before 1866 often pertain to plantation life and slavery and postwar papers contain materials reflecting the political opinions of the conservative white element in Florida towards Reconstruction. (See Folders 1-8).

Included are letters expressing the difficulty in acquiring slave labor in 1857 (Folder 4) and the fear of slave uprisings in Florida in 1865 (Folder 7).

Some of the materials in this collection have been digitized and are available online. Click here to link to the finding aid for this collection and to access the digitized content.

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