John W. Hatch papers, 1967-1995.

October 12, 2009 Leave a comment Go to comments

Creator: Hatch, John W. (John Wesley), 1928-
Collection number: 4801
View finding aid.

Abstract: John W. Hatch began teaching at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Public Health in 1971 and retired from UNC-CH as Kenan Professor of Health Education in 1995. Papers of John W. Hatch, documenting his involvement in health education issues in the United States and throughout the world. The collection reflects Hatch’s interest in improving health care for underserved populations, including African-Americans. Domestically, the papers document, among other projects, Hatch’s work with the Delta Health Center, a nonprofit health organization located in Mound Bayou, Miss., and the Community Health Education and Resources Utilization Project (Black Churches Project), an effort to train lay people to be health resources in their local communities.There is also material relating to sickle cell anemia research. International health projects covered include the UNC-CH School of Public Health’s Practical Training in Health Education project in Cameroon, Hatch’s work on the World Council of Churches’ Christian Medical Commission, and Hatch’s travels to South Africa under the aegis of the Progressive Primary Health Care Network.

Repository: Southern Historical Collection

Collection Highlights:┬áThe collection reflects Hatch’s interest in improving health care for underserved populations, including African-Americans. Main focuses include Hatch’s work with the Delta Health Center, a nonprofit health organization located in Mound Bayou, Miss., and the Community Health Education and Resources Utilization Project (Black Churches Project), an effort to train lay people to be health resources in their local communities (See particularly Subseries 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3). There is also material relating to sickle cell anemia research (See Subseries 2.7)

Series 1 contains several articles relating to the African American church and their role in promoting health care in the community.

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