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W. Stump Forwood papers, 1836-1897.

October 12, 2009

Creator: Forwood, W. Stump (William Stump), 1830-1892.
Collection number: 260
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Abstract: William Stump Forwood was a physician of Darlington, Harford County, Md. Forwood, who attempted to justify slavery on medical grounds, served as president of various local medical societies and was a local historian of his home town. The collection includes correspondence, speeches and writings, magazine and newspaper clippings, financial papers, and pictures of William Stump Forwood. Included are letters, 1864-1865, from Forwood’s brother Henry Hays Forwood (b. 8 November 1842), who was a prisoner in Camp Morton, Ind., during the Civil War, and Forwood’s father Samuel (fl. 1800-1890), in Gosport, Clarke County, Ala. materials. Among the clippings are advertisements for medical devices, most notably several for uterine supporters. Among the photographs are two pictures of a device for treating a fractured clavicle.

Repository: Southern Historical Collection

Collection Highlights: Included in the collection are letters discussing the alleged intellectual inferiority of the black race (1857) and writings and speeches concerning slavery, including: “The Negro — A Distinct Species” (1857), “Notes on Ethnological and Anatomical Differences in the Races” (1861), and “Slavery the Cause of War” (1861- 1865).