26 August 1863: “This is to certify that John Bradley…paid $500 rec’d his Certificate of exception for a year.”

Item description: Court order, written on 25 August 1863 and certified on 26 August 1863, certifying a conscription exemption for a plantation overseer.  The document shows $500 paid for the exemption and is an example of the so-called “Twenty-Slave Law” in action (see below).

[transcription available below images]

18630826_002 18630826_003

Item citation: From folder 18 of the George William Logan Papers #1560, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item transcription:

State of Louisiana               12th District Court

Parish of Frankling           Clerk’s Office

Before me the undersigned authority personally came Mrs. Caroline Mackey, who being duly sworn, deposes and says that after diligent search she can find no person to manage the affairs of her plantation in a suitable manner, to be placed in the stead of John Bradly has present overseer, so help her God.

Sworn and subscribed Caroline + Mark Mackey before me, this 25th August, 1863

A. J. Osborn, Clerk

State of Louisiana             12th District Court

Parish of Franklin                Clerk’s Office

Before me the undersigned authority personally came Messrs. Charles E. Ramage and Herman Black. Two citizens residing in this Parish who being duly sworn, depose and say that of their own knowledge, John Bradly has been overseeing for Mrs. Carolina Mackey from previous to the year 1862, up to the present time and that he has been on said plantation as overseer five years. 

Sworn and subscribed before me this 25th day of August 1863

A. J. Osborne, Clerk                     C. E. Ramage and Herman Black

Fort Beauregard Pa

Aug 26th 1863

This is to certify that John Bradly paid Capt B.F. Cauthorn post A 2. U. 

$500.00 

rec’d his

Certificate of exception for a year

G.H. Logan

Lt. Col County Posh[?]

More about this item: Find out more about the “Twenty Slave Law” here.

 

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