18 July 1864: “[...] I was glad to hear that you had recovered all your negroes except two. I hope it is two.”

Item description:  Letter dated 18 July 1864, from H.H. Burwell to his brother George W. Burwell.  This letter discusses planting corn crops, weather, and the recovery of enslaved negroes.  George W. Burwell was a physician, planter, and businessman of Mecklenburg County, Va.18640718_01 18640718_02Item citation:  Letter dated 18 July 1864, in the George W. Burwell Papers #4291, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item transcription:

Williamston N.C. July 18th 1864.

Dear Bro Geo
When Bro Bob left your house two weeks ago we expected by this time to have sent our waggons over with some provisions But as I was not done plowing my corn I went down yesterday to see Bob he thought it would make no difference with you to defer the trip one week in order that we might finish plowing our corn. I am running ten plows + hope to get through this week, Bob had a good rain last week which my land has not been wet for six weeks, my corn crop is impaired by the drought. I saw Armistead’s Boy Stephen yesterday was sorry to learn from him that he had sent you no horse. I asked Stephen if he was going to send you any provisions he did not know, I was glad to hear that you had recovered all your negroes except two. I hope it is two. I will try + come over when the waggon comes. My love to your family

Your Bro Very Truly etc.
H.H. Burwell

 

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