Author Archives: brownbo

19 April 1864: “Our position is considered by all to be a permanent one as they have sent all the white troops to Virginia & left us here to guard the place, so if the Rebels don’t attack us we will no doubt remain here undisturbed for a long time.”

Item Description:  Last part of a multi-day letter that started on 11 April 1864.  In this letter, dated 19 April 1864, Jonathan L. Whitaker writes to his wife, Julia A. Wells Whitaker, about making it to camp in Beaufort, S.C., … Continue reading

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13 April 1864: “The most of the dwelling houses however are occupied by negroes, I suppose the slaves of their former masters who have run away.”

Item Description:  Continuation of a multi-day letter that started on 11 April 1864.  In this letter, dated 13 April 1864, Jonathan L. Whitaker writes to his wife, Julia A. Wells Whitaker, about traveling down to Hilton Head, S.C. and then … Continue reading

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12 April 1864:”About Sundown tonight we expect to pass in sight of the City of Charleston and Fort Sumpter, those two celebrated objects which have been familiar to us since the war broke out.”

Item Description:  Continuation of a multi-day letter that started on 11 April 1864.  In this letter, dated 12 April 1864, Jonathan L. Whitaker writes to his wife, Julia A. Wells Whitaker, while travelling down the coast of South Carolina.  As he … Continue reading

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11 April 1864: “Sea sickness must be felt to be described, so different from everything else, so harmless, and yet making one feel so intensely wretched.”

Item Description:  Multi-day letter dated 11 April 1864 from Jonathan L. Whitaker to his wife, Julia A. Wells Whitaker.  In this letter Jonathan writes to his wife from off the coast of North Carolina about travelling by ship to Beaufort, … Continue reading

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28 March 1864: “…he knows of no disease so prostrating as diptheria & that in such a severe attack as Johnnie’s has been it takes weeks and sometimes months to recover entirely…”

Item description: Letter, dated 28 March 1864, from Annie Schon in Atlanta, GA to her sister Bettie Kimberly in Chapel Hill, NC.  Annie describes her husband John and son Johnnie’s diagnosis with diphtheria and their subsequent treatment and recoveries. [transcription … Continue reading

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17 March 1864: “Those soldiers report everything quiett in the front they say they are on the hunt of two men that has stolen horses from their command…”

Item Description:  Letter dated 17 March 1864, from F. Margaret Espey to her brother Joseph S. Espey, a member of Company D, 65th Georgia Volunteers stationed mainly in Tennessee and Georgia, who was frequently ill and wrote of the medical … Continue reading

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6 March 1864: “The report is still there has been a battle in Virginia. It lasted a day and a half. The enemy attacked us. Lee fell back slowly the first evening.”

Item Description:  Diary entry dated 6 March 1864, written by Samuel A. Agnew.  This entry focuses on Agnew attending church services, a reported battle in Virginia, and a possible battle in Georgia.  Samuel Agnew grew up and attended college and seminary … Continue reading

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26 February 1864: “…often when I press the precious child to my heart I feel that it will break. I do not know why it is, I often fear it may be a presentiment of future evil, but when I see him so perfectly lovely and angelic in his nature, I fear that he is but a loan from God, which He will soon recall…”

Item Description:  Letter dated 26 February 1864, from Annie Maney Schon to her sister Bettie Maney Kimberly. In this letter, Annie discusses her health after childbirth and the worries and fears she has as a mother.  She also discusses parenting, … Continue reading

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17 February 1864: “We cannot tell how long the Yankees will hold Meridian or what effect it will have upon this portion of the county though we are certain that it bodes no good for it.”

Item Description:  Letter dated 17 February 1864, by May “Mollie” Long to her fiance Harrison “Harry” Wells.  In this letter, Molly writes about the Union occupation of Meridian, evacuation of her college at Corinth, social activities, having her “picture” made … Continue reading

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14 February 1864: “Ma often tells me what a good boy you are making of your John & says it is high time for me to begin to break my John’s will too, but that is something I never intend to do…”

Item Description:  Letter dated 14 February 1864, from Bettie Maney Kimberly to her sister, Annie Maney Schon.  In this letter, Bettie discusses her children and mother, as well as expresses her wish that her sister (Annie) could be there with … Continue reading

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