Author Archives: scrisp

2 May 1864: “I earnestly hope we may have a chance to fight…for the other thousands of anguished hearts…& also the cherishing of those passions of hatred & revenge which it would promote & encourage.

Item Description: Letter, 2 May 1864 and continued 11 May 1864, from Jonathan Lewis Whitaker to his wife, Julia A. Wells Whitaker, updating her on the conditions in his camp his well-being. Whitaker was an Orange County, N.Y., physician serving as a … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

10 April 1864: “rebel indeed, proud invaders, when shall we teach you the bitterness of that word again!”

Item Description: Diary entry, 15 April 1864, by Sarah Lois Wadley, describing the Union occupation of Monroe. Wadley was the daughter of William Morrill Wadley (1812?-1882) and Rebecca Barnard Everingham Wadley (fl. 1840-1884) and lived with her family in homes near Amite in … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , | Comments Off

15 March 1864: “I should have received “more’n a hundred bushels” of letters from the young ladies”

Item Description: Letter, 15th March 1864, from Edward W. Allen to his parents, James and Emily Allen. Edward W. Allen of Eau Claire, Wis., was a sergeant and then second lieutenant in Company H of the 16th Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry Volunteers, during … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

29 February 1864: “there has been a big battle in Virginia in which the Yankees were as badly whipped as they ever have been.”

Item description: Diary entry, 29 February 1864, written by Samuel Andrew Agnew. Agnew grew up and attended college and seminary in Due West, S.C. In 1852, he moved to Mississippi, and thereafter lived in the northeastern part of the state, chiefly in … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , | Comments Off

23 February 1864: “The commission officers…are to be treated like faithful dogs worn out with age.”

Item Description: Letter, 23 February 1864, to Governor Zebulon B. Vance from Brigadier-General W. L. Quarles, C.S.A., protesting against turning over the commissioned officers of the North Carolina regiments to the War Department. [transcription available below image] Item Citation: From the Jane … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , | Comments Off

13 February 1864: “…he had spent the three nights previous to his arrest in the woods, evading Conscript officers.”

Item description: Report, dated 13 February 1864, of a man arrested for hiding from Confederate conscript officers, his parents forging his age, and his father being a Union sympathizer. Item citation: From folder 22 in the George William Logan Papers, … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Comments Off

7 February 1864: “to place helpless women in such a position as this! none but a base grovelling covetous yankee would do it.”

Item description: Letter, 7 February 1864, from Louisa (Quitman) Lovell Chadbourne to her husband Joseph Lovell. In the letter, Louisa comments on the behavior of her servants and the disappearance of many of them. [item transcription available below images] Item citation: … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | 1 Comment

21 January 1864: “Hell is truth seen too late.”

Item description: Diary entry, 21 January 1864, describing violence and casualties among civilians and deserters, written by Jason Niles. Niles practiced law for 46 years in Kosciusko, Miss., and served as a Republican U. S. representative from 1873-1875. His diaries are an … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

13 January 1864: “The conscriptors have apprehended him several times but he always manages to get away from them.”

Item description: Diary entry, 13 January 1864, written by Samuel Andrew Agnew. Agnew grew up and attended college and seminary in Due West, S.C. In 1852, he moved to Mississippi, and thereafter lived in the northeastern part of the state, chiefly … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , | Comments Off

24 November 1863: “for horses will be horses next spring if we live to see the time”

Item Description:  Letter, 24 November 1863, in which Parker informs his parents that his horse was condemned by the Army, and asks them about the possibility of him buying another horse and keeping it with them during the winter. Parker served … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , | Comments Off