11 July 1864: “Do you perceive,” said Forrest, “that there is a contrast between my whiskers and the hair on my head?”

Item Description: “Too Good to be Lost,” The Daily Journal (Wilmington, N.C.), 11 July 1864, page 2, column 2.

18640711

Transcription:

Too Good to be Lost.

It is said that when Gen. Forrest, last spring, was en route from Marion to this city, he was accosted in the cars by a loquacious lady, who took a seat by his side and addressed him in something like the following strain, ” I think,” said she, “that all the glory that covers our arms is due singly and alone to private soldiers ; they do the fighting—not the officers—and for my part I will give them all the praise. I have a beautiful home not far distant ; and, as I am blessed with plenty, I desire that whenever private soldiers pass by my residence they should call on me, so that I may feed and otherwise cheer them on their toilsome way. I don’t care whether an epauletted officer enters my house, &c., &c.”

“Do you perceive,” said Forrest, “that there is a contrast between my whiskers and the hair on my head?”

“Yes,” answered the lady, surveying the General, “I see that your head is inclined to be gray, while your whiskers are very black and glossy. Can you explain why this is so ?” asked the lady.

“Certainty, madam,” said Forrest, fixing his keen eyes upon her inquisitive face, “the explanation is easy : I work with my head a great deal, while I use my jaw as little as possible.”

The lady took the hint and said no more.

Item Citation: “Too Good to be Lost,” The Daily Journal (Wilmington, N.C.), 11 July 1864, page 2, column 2. Call number C071 W74j, North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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10 July 1864: “Dear Mother I think I can say that should it be my lot to meet the King of Terrors, I could do so without fear – ‘for thy rod and thy staff – they uphold me’[...]”

Item description:  Letter dated 10 July 1864 from Andrew Lucas Hunt to his mother, Sophia Hunt, with news of camp life and the death of fellow officer, Captain Lewis.  Andrew Lucas Hunt (1843-1905) of Chicago, Ill., was an officer with the 134th Illinois Regiment, United States Army, during the Civil War. 18640710_01 18640710_02Item citation:  Letter dated 10 July 1864, in the Andrew Lucas Hunt Papers, #3225, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item transcription:

Camp Hancock July 10 Sunday.

My dear Mother
I have written a long letter to you on today. I merely write this to let you know that Capt Lewis is dead. He died about 15 minutes ago. I was present at the time. He was totaly unconscious of all passing events. The surgeon had him moved from his tent to the Hospital tent this afternoon. He did not know how near death he was. – he was so much better last evening that they thought of sending him home this AM – they obtained a furlough for him – but he was taken with a chill last night just as the fever left him and it cost him his life. Poor Man!

What thoughts this occurrence has brought up? How near Death has been to us – two deaths in the same week!! – I was talking to Col. McChesney he said he had hoped to take the regiment back to Chicago without loosing a man – Dear Mother I think I can say that should it be my lot to meet the King of Terrors, I could do so without fear – “for thy rod and thy staff – they uphold me” – I feel very sorry for his Company – I could not help shed tears when his men came up, one by one and took a farewell glance at him just before his death. He is not married – May God comfort his brothers and sisters! – He has six brothers. – It has thrown a gloom over all the regiment.

With very much love to all –
from your affectionate son
Lucas

I received the evening Fathers letter of then notifying me that he had sent me the mosquito gauze – very very much obliged. I hardly care about doing anything tonight. Poor Capt. Linn – He came out to fight for his Country – but lost his life and never struck a blow. He most truly has lain down his life for his Country!! Whose turn may it be next! – I feel so sorry. “The Lord doeth all things well” – “Thy will O God be done.” I am going the Grand Rounds tonight with Col. Bigelow.

L.

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9 July 1864: “We regard it as not only dangerous, but certainly and positively injurious.”

Item Description: “Yankee Deserters” (editorial), The Daily Journal (Wilmington, N. C.), 9 July 1864.

18640709

Transcription:

Yankee Deserters.

We learn that some forty-two deserters from GRANT’S army arrived here last night under guard from Petersburg.

We have a word to say about these people who come as deserters from the LINCOLN army, and are employed on any of our works, public or private, and we shall say it briefly :—To the best of our knowledge and belief, experience and observation, they would be more properly designate as Yankee emissaries, sowing the seeds of discontent and dissatisfaction among our own people, availing themselves of every opportunity to corrupt our negroes, and sooner or later contriving to get off again to the enemy with all the information they may have been able to glean.

The policy of employing them at our railroads or other works does not appear to us to be at all a doubtful one. We, at least, have no doubts at all upon the subject. We regard it as not only dangerous, but certainly and positively injurious. We have no hesitation in saying that the policy is a wrong one, and ought to be discontinued.

P. S. Since the above was written, we have been informed that the forty-two Lincolnites brought here to-day are not deserters, but prisoners captured on the line of the Petersburg and Weldon Road, and that they are about the hardest and most motley human crowd that can well be imagined. This, however, does not detract in any way from the truth of our remarks about the employment of deserters or allowing them to circulate at large in any of our communities. We repeat, they must be regarded and ought to be treated as emissaries, ultimately to become spies.

Item Citation: “Yankee Deserters” (editorial), The Daily Journal (Wilmington, N.C.), 9 July 1864, page 2, column 2. Call number C071 W74j, North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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8 July 1864: ” . . . its principles are treasonable and its oaths criminal.”

Item Description: excerpt from “The Situation” (editorial), The Daily Journal (Wilmington, N. C.) 8 July 1864.

18640708

Transcription:

Since the publication of the revelations in regard to a secret treasonable order said to exist in this State—an order of northern origin, we have heard enough to convince us that it is not only said to exist, but that it does exist. We are bad at hunting up details or identifying persons, but apart from what we have seen in print, we have seen and heard enough to convince us that not only does such a thing exist, but that it has penetrated to this section of the State, and for ought we know has its members and initiators even in our midst. At any rate, it might be as well for the people and the public authorities to be on their guard. We do not care whose election this thing may incidentally be intended to subserve, its principles are treasonable and its oaths criminal. Any intelligent man who may have been so unfortunate as to have been drawn into it, need only to use his common sense and common honesty, and he will be convinced of the fact that it is not right, and that while in it, he is not in the right place.

Citation: excerpt from “The Situation” (editorial), The Daily Journal (Wilmington, N. C.) 8 July 1864 page 2, column 1. Call number C071z, North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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7 July 1864: “The evidences of the existence of a secret organization of the most dangerous and unholy character . . .”

Item Description: “The Elections in this State” (editorial), The Daily Journal (Wilmington, N.C.), 7 July 1864.

18640707

18640707_02

Transcription:

The Elections in this State.

On this day four weeks the people of North Carolina will be called upon to elect a Governor, Members of the Senate and House of Commons and Sheriffs.

Contrary to our wishes, and in spite of our earnest remonstrance, the State is the scene of a bitter personal and political contest, and her people are agitated by the passions incident to an excited canvass, at the same time that they are warring for existence itself, and struggling in the throes through which all must pass on their way to independence.

Out of evil perhaps good may come, and we can cheerfully welcome the good as some compensation for the evil, although we could never assent to the doctrine or practice of doing evil that good may come of it.—  However the present contest for Governor may terminate, to Mr. W. W. HOLDEN, as he already claims the honor of founding the “Conservative” party in North Carolina, must hereafter be accorded the credit of breaking up that proscriptive organization. It is ail in his line, for does he not vaunt the power to “kill” as well as to make “alive?”

We may deprecate Mr. HOLDEN’S present candidacy and we do deprecate it, but we do this from motives and for reasons far above party.  Had party considerations alone governed us, or those with whom we concur in opinion, we would have hailed with pleasure this split in the party by which we have been meet bitterly denounced and ruthlessly proscribed. We would have done all that we could do to induce Mr. Holden to come out. But we did nothing of the kind. We declined running a candidate of our own before the split arising out of Mr. Holden’s candidacy. We have declined since making any move calculated to take advantage of that split. We declared ourselves at the first willing for the sake of peace and harmony to waive opposition to Governor Vance. Our position was so proclaimed and has since been loyally adhered to. So far as we are concerned, it will be adhered to to the end, and our suffrages will be given in accordance with our professions. We cannot speak for others, but we think this is the prevailing sentiment and determination in this section. Hard as Mr. HOLDEN has worked and good service as he has done in breaking up the “Conservative” party, we cannot yet reward his faithlessness to all parties by casting for him a full vote for Governor, or even giving him that half-vote which consists in withholding our vote from his competitor. We think the “Confederate” voters of this section will come forward openly and fully for Governor VANCE. It will make but little difference at any rate, in a party point of view, since Mr. HOLDEN has been the means of sowing the seeds of speedy dissolution in the “Conservative” ranks, and we have only to bide our time.  From a patriotic and unpolitical point of view the difference is great and inconceivable.  The election of Mr. HOLDEN could hardly fail to be productive of results deeply to be regretted.

We have been speaking as persons outside the pale of the “Conservative” party—as Southern Rights men only, or, as we have been kindly denominated, “Destructives.”  Of course to the members of the “Conservative” party, as party-men, we would not presume to give advice.  They can now see for themselves, and they will soon see more plainly the result of Mr. HOLDEN’S movements.  It is for them to judge and act, not for us to advise.  If their organization is interfered with and their councils distracted, they have Mr. HOLDEN and not us to thank for it.  We have often before stated our grounds for withholding opposition to Governor VANCE, and have defined the character and extent of the support we are prepared to give him, which does not commit us to his political position, and still less compromise him to ours.  To the baselessness and absurdity of the attacks upon Governor Vance because those who before opposed his election, are willing now to forbear that opposition, we have Mr. HOLDEN’S own recorded testimony, in his own words, copied from the Standard of the 7th October, 1863.  Mr. Holden then said : “If his [GOV. VANCE's] enemies praise him, he cannot help it; and so long as his friends are satisfied with him, they should regard this praise as the moralist regards hypocrisy, as ‘the tribute which vice pays to virtue.” In the face of this, how can Mr. HOLDEN through the Standard, or his right hand organ and conch-blower of the Progress keep harping upon the fact that certain former opponents of Gov. VANCE now support him?

Unfortunately for Mr. Holden the proofs of his disaffection, not simply to the Confederate administration, but to the Confederate Government, are too strong to be met by a simple denial. Respectable members of the Legislature, of his own party, have certified, over their own signatures, that during the session of the Legislature last winter, he did make use of expressions that left and can leave no doubt of his feelings and position in this respect.  The evidences of the existence of a secret organization of a most dangerous and unholy character in this State, which we lay before our readers to-day, ought to give pause to all right-thinking and patriotic men.  We trust and believe that few have gone into it—very few, with any adequate idea of its real character, and we feel confident that its days are numbered, and that under the light of exposure its influence and power for evil will wither and shrink away.

We know nothing of this thing personally, although we heard talk of such a thing several weeks ago. We have no idea that Mr. HOLDEN is a member of it, but we cannot relieve our minds from the painful impression left by Mr. CHURCHILL’S letter, that it was in some way connected with or designed to promote his success.  It is certainly a little remarkable that the Standard of the 5th instant, now before us, has not a word to say about this treasonable association.  That paper did not use to be so mum when secret, oath-bound political associations were in question.  It did yeoman’s service against the Know Nothings. It may be worth while to mark its course towards the “H. O. A.”

Be not deceived by noisy appeals. Watch things calmly between to-day and this day four weeks, and cast your votes patriotically as freemen, unbiassed by party watchwords, or by the cant of self seeking demagogueism.

Item Citation: “The Elections in this State” (editorial), The Daily Journal (Wilmington, N.C.), 7 July 1864, page 2, columns 1-2. Call number C071 W74j, North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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6 July 1864: “You speak of riding with Col. McChesney and note his mentioning that I was not pleasant enough to the other officers. It may be that I am not familiar enough with some, but as yet I have not found time to idle away in the company of officers whose rank does not give them wit or intelligence.”

Item description:  Letter dated 6 July 1864, from Lieutenant Colonel John C. Bigelow of the 134th Illinois Infantry Regiment to his friend, Hamilton Hunt.  This letter was sent from Camp Hancock in Columbus, Ky. and describes camp life, packages received, and the position of the 141st Illinois Regiment.  This letter was found in the Andrew Lucas Hunt Papers, 1863 – 1908.  Andrew Lucas Hunt (1843-1905) of Chicago, Ill., was a lieutenant with the 134th Illinois Regiment, United States Army, during the Civil War. 18640706_01 18640706_02 18640706_0318640706_04Item Citation:  Letter dated 6 July 1864, in the Andrew Lucas Hunt Papers, #3225, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription:

Camp Hancock
Columbus, Ky. July 6th, 1864

Friend Hamilton

Yours of June 30th came to hand on the “Fourth.” We had the day before received the boxes + kegs: They came in good order and opened to our satisfaction. We thought best not to propose a common table as some seemed unwilling to divide, but nevertheless quite a dinner was got up which satisfied all the boys. The pickles, Butter and lemons were very acceptable. The thanks of the officers + men of Co’s D + I are due to Mrs. Dickinson [?] Fauntleroy and yourself and I can assure you that your efforts and good intentions are fully appreciated. You speak of riding with Col. McChesney and note his mentioning that I was not pleasant enough to the other officers. It may be that I am not familiar enough with some, but as yet I have not found time to idle away in the company of officers whose rank does not give them wit or intelligence. I find much more entertainment in the study of such books as qualify me for the place I hold, and if these officers that complain of my not spending all my time with them in profitless amusements would study their books they would have less to find fault with and would show less ignorance in the field. I can’t say that Col. McC. is as well posted in Battalion drill as he should be. The “Fourth” was a very cool day and was pleasantly passed by the boys. Some of the companies illuminated their quarters and others built large bonfires. The health of the regiment is good, there bring but a very few in the Hospital and they not sick with anything dangerous. The regiment makes a very fine appearance on parade and has earned an enviable name for good and soldierly conduct. Metlar says you hit him in the right spot when you sent him that camp stool. He will write soon. Luke and all the rest of our boys are well. Give my respects to all the old boys that may enquire about us and remember me to your father’s family.

Yours Truly,

Jno. C. Bigelow

P.S. The 141st Ill. are incamped about a mile south of us. Frank Gilman and W.S. Watrous old E.Z.’s are both orderly sargeants in that regiment. They pay us frequent visits and I think, feel more at home here than with their own regiment.

J.C.B.

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4 July 1864: “Your company with lady is requested at a celebration of the 4th of July, to be held in Fort Macon…”

Item Description: An invitation and order of exercises for the First Regiment North Carolina Union Volunteers’ Fourth of July celebration at Fort Macon, North Carolina. The pre-printed invitation is addressed to “Collector Hendricks…with lady.” The celebration included a “National Salute,” reading of the Declaration of Independence, music, prayer, orations, a concert, and fireworks.

Item Transcription:

INDEPENDENCE

Collector Hendricks, with Lady
Your Company is requested at a celebration of the 4th of July, to be held in Fort Macon, on
Monday, July 4, 1864,
by the 1st Reg. N.C. Union Volunteers

Capt. H. D. Clift
Lieut. J. B. Reed
Com. on Invitations

FORT MACON, N.C., JULY 4, 1864
Order of Exercises

Col. J. M. McChesney…Presiding Officer
Lt. Col. J. H. Strong…Marshal of the Day
I. National Salute at 12 PM
II. Assembly at 1 PM…By Drum Corps
III. Music…By Band
IV. Prayer…By Chaplain Mosmore
V. Music…By Band
VI. Reading of the Declaration of Independence, By Lt. E. H. Babbitt
VII. Music…By Band
VIII. Oration…By J. Crolley
IX. Music…By Quartetto Club
X. Oration…By J. C. Salter
XI. Music…By Band
XII. Dinner…At 4 1/2 o’clock, PM
XIII. Promenade Concert…By Band
XIV. Fire Works…At 8 1/2 o’clock, PM
XV. Supper…At 11 o’clock, PM

Item Citation: Independence. United States Army. 1st North Carolina Regiment. [n.p.], 1864. Cb970.742 N87u. North Carolina Collection, Wilson Special Collections Library.

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3 July 1864: “[...]we have fixed up our quarters with bowers, etc – very nice – I built me a spring bed two hickory poles – lay barrel staves on them – tack them down – and I have as good a bed as I want.”

Item description:  Letter originally dated 2 July 1864 and continued on 3 July 1864, from Andrew Lucas Hunt to his mother Sophia Hunt, describing camp life.  Andrew Lucas Hunt (1843-1905) of Chicago, Ill., was an officer with the 134th Illinois Regiment, United States Army, during the Civil War. 18640703_01 18640703_02 18640703_03Item citation:  Letter dated 2 July 1864, in the Andrew Lucas Hunt Papers, #3225, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item transcription:

 
[Letter continued from 2 July 1864.]
 
Sunday July 3, 1864.  Just (1/3) one third of our 100 days has gone by today. This AM we received 1 box lemons- 3 boxes sundries, and 1 pkg butter + one keg – think it is pickles. have my pair of suspenders, + “Bugle Call” – very much obliged. This “Call” is very acceptable – I am not very well – have head ache – was on duty for nearly 40 hours this week – The Faunt LeRoys are well. we have fixed up our quarters with bowers, etc – very nice – I built me a spring bed two hickory poles – lay barrel staves on them – tack them down – and I have as good a bed as I want. We had heavy rain all night – my tent leaked – I wraped myself up in my rubber blanket and slept regardless of the rain – I would like to have a piece of Mosquito gauze – large enough to cover a cot bed – send also about 30 ft of wire to support it – The pillow cases will come in very nicely – [?] dress looks very naturally – I am very sorry to hear of Richard [?] death – It must indeed be a sad blow to his parents – It was so very sudden – I would write a longer letter than this on – but am entirely out of writing paper – send me some the first opportunity – some larger than note paper. It is very warm today – we cant sit in our tents – so hot. I ought to write to Willie – Father Hamilton – in fact – all of the family – I received the morning I went out as a scout, letter from all the family nearly – I read them as I rode along – could not but help thinking “how I wished I could see you all once again.” I was up part of the night – so slept a short time this noon – I woke up at one o’clock to go to dinner – the thought of all at home came to me – you were probably eating your dinner the same time that I was eating my bread + molasses + water – I can’t drink coffee without milk – or at least does not agree with me – Evening – I have just been asking the men to go to church – am very tired Sunday is the hardest day we have – have to inspect all the men – very hard work. It does not seem to me as if tomorrow was the Glorious Fourth! I will try to write tomorrow – want to have the go by tomorrow morning mail – I do not feel as if I had spent Sunday rightly – have not been to Sunday School – or to church today – I think today is communion Sunday at in Chicago I could not help thinking, at half past twelve of [?] – I shall remember her particularly in my prayers – How I wish I could have been there – who has united with the church today? Will write more fully tomorrow – I have been out more than I ought to have been today – Whitehead wishes to be remembered kindly to you – and all the family. I generally read him my letters – give Bigelow Metlar + Dickinson extracts – anything that interests them sixty seven days more to serve – kind regards to Gussie with very much love to you all at home
will occupy the Fourth writing home – if I can find paper
Lucas

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2 July 1864: “I have been at work shading my tent + am so hot + feel so dirty, that I hardly can write[...]“

Item description: Letter dated 2 July 1864, from Andrew Lucas Hunt to his mother, Sophia Hunt, about camp life and news from home.  Andrew Lucas Hunt (1843-1905) of Chicago, Ill., was an officer with the 134th Illinois Regiment, United States Army, during the Civil War.

[This is a two-part letter that continues on 3 July 1864.]18640702_01 18640702_02Item citation:  Letter dated 2 July 1864, in the Andrew Lucas Hunt Papers, #3225, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item transcription:

Columbus July 2, 1864
 
My dear Mother
I am so very behind hand in writing home that I fear that I can never catch up.  The box came to hand the day before yesterday, I am very glad to have it –my best is a very nice one just what was wanted.  My jacket is also very usefull – will do for night duty.  The shoes I have not tried on – have not had time to.  I would have written yesterday but was ordered to take command of a squad of men to go outside of the picket lines – on a forage – and it took me all day – this A.M. I had to go down town with the Colonel – so my time was taken up till now.  I have written to Henry Chapin I was very sorry to hear of the death of his Father.  I saw a letter of John Chapins received the day before your letter. He did not say his father was unwell – it must have been very sudden.  I have been at work shading my tent + am so hot + feel so dirty, that I hardly can write – I took the old pr of pants to the tailor at the soldiers rest to fix up.  I am now weary the pr sent down there the box – they are rather small but will do for occasional wear.  I have some twelve letters to write – I am afraid I can’t answer each personally – but let my letter be an answer to them all.  I will try to write long letter[s] + write them often.  We had a call today from Frank Gilman.  Hamilton knows him – he is orderly Sergeant of his brother’s company in the 141st – which arrived here yesterday – Being out in the sun all day yesterday – and this am – I feel very measly today.
 
[Letter continues on 3 July 1864]

 

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1 July 1864: “A negro man named Sam called at my house this morning, who says he was freed from his master’s farm in Mecklenburg (Dr. Burwell) by the Yankees this Sunday and was with them till Tuesday when he made his escape and is now trying to make his way home.”

Item Description:  A note dated 1 July 1864, from Blanche W. Sydnar to George W. Burwell, a physician, planter, and businessman of Mecklenburg County, Va., with the news of Sam, claiming that he had been forced from George’s home by Yankees, had arrived at her house and that she had written him a pass to get home.18640701_01a 18640701_02aItem Citation:  Letter dated 1 July 1864, in the George W. Burwell Papers #4291, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription:

A negro man named Sam called at my house this morning, who says he was freed from his master’s farm in Mecklenburg (Dr. Burwell) by the Yankees this Sunday and was with them till Tuesday when he made his escape and is now trying to make his way home. I gave him something to eat and sent him on with two others belonging to Capt. Watkins & [?] Davis.

Blanche W. Sydnar

P.S. My husband, Rev. T. W. Sydnar is now at home, but I consented to give Sam a pass, hoping he may get home safely.

B.W.S.

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