16 April 1865: “…we got the news of Lee’s capture you had aught to have seen the excitement…”

Item Description: Letter dated 16 April 1865 from I. Shoger to his wife. A Union soldier stationed in Raleigh, North Carolina, Shoger writes to his wife about the excitement surrounding Lee’s surrender.

18650416_0118650416_02

Item Citation: Folder 49, Federal Soldiers Letters, #3185, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Raleigh April 16th N.C./65

Dear wife

When I wrote you last I told you we were agoing some where we mached the next morning for Raleigh 50 miles it took us these days we went through Smithfield wich is a very fine city at this place we got the news of Lees capture you had aught to have seen the excitement. the dispatch was sedd by Genl Sherman in front of the Court house. our band was at the head of the collume we played all the National ? the soldiers threu up thare hats and chreed with all thair might. they got a negro on a blanket and threu  him ten feet. we then marched for Raleigh. this also a very fine city. all the force we have to contend with now is Johnson comand wich left the city as we entered it beiyn surrenderd by the mayor and counsil. negotions are now going on while I am writing for the surrender of his command (Johnson). this will close up the whole concern: what we shall do next I do not know but until then I remain yours as ever form the beginning to the end

yours I. Shoger

N.B.-

we expect to have a mail to day

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

15 April 1865: “Yesterday so beautiful & the air so dry & clear with a Happy President and a happy people- Today a Dead President murdered by a citizen of the United States”

Item Description: April 15th, 1865 diary entry in Henry Clay Warmoth’s Civil War diary.  Warmoth was stationed in Washington D.C. and describes the somber mood in the city after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.  Henry Clay Warmoth was a lieutenant colonel of the 32nd Missouri Volunteers, assigned to the staff of General John A. McClernand.  He served as Governor of Louisiana from 1868-1872.

18650415_0118650415_0218650415_03

Item Citation: Folder 125, in the Henry Clay Warmoth Papers, #752, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Saturday Ap 15th 1865

I did not know the above facts until this morning- the city which but a few hours before was most brillianly illuminated, is now drape draped in the saddest sadest moning, over the murder of our President. The Elements seem to mourn the calamity for today it rains- & the Heavens are thick with clouds- Yesterday so beautiful & the air so dry & clear with a Happy President and a happy people- Today a Dead President murdered by a citizen of the United States- A moning people- & the city- the Country & the Heavens moning & weeping at her lost- I was at a meeting called by Senator Yates, Gov Oglesby & others at Senator Yates Room, to take such action & might be proper for Illinois to take- It was well attended- Yates, Oglesby, Haynie, Faresworth, Arnold, Genl Hunter, Speaker Colfax of Ind. & many others were there- Resolutions were adopted- & ? appointed to make arrangements for his funeral, & a resolution was passed requesting Mr. Lincoln & famly to have his bones internd at Springfield Ills- the capitul of his State and his home- the meeting assumed to meet on Monday at 3 oclock- The business Houses are all closed- Mr Lincoln died at a little Home oposite Fords Theatre, at 20 minutes past seven oclock this morning- God save the country. The streets are crowded with tearful eyes & solem faces- little knots of a dozen men can be seen all over town- It is believed that J Wilkes Booth the Tragedian is the murderer of Mr Lincoln. There seems to be one opinion about it- There was a member in the ?- He was heard to say two days ago “That when he left the American stage the world would know it” I have often seen him play Richard III & admired him very much in that character- The murder may justice reach him & may God have mercy on his soul- Mr Lincoln remains were removed at 9 oclock to the White House- where they will remain until his funeral takes place

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

14 April 1865: “Mayo’s bridge was fired by incendiaries long before orders were given. none of this is to be published”

Item Description: Two letters dated 14 April 1865.  The first is a letter from Mary C. Gantt to Lizinka Campbell Ewell.  She discusses Hariett “Hattie” Ewell’s adjustment to living with the Gantts in St. Louis.  She also implores Lizinka to leave Nashville.  The second letter is a report about the burning of Richmond from Campbell Brown.  While he reports that the Tredegar Iron Works were saved, there is infrastructure being burned without orders.

18650414_01

18650414_0218650414_03

Item Citation: Folder 12, Polk, Brown, and Ewell Family Papers, #605, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

St. Louis_ Missouri

April 14th 1865

Dear Lizinka,

It occurred to me that there might be some satisfaction to you in learning something about Hattie_ I mean the impression she makes on other people– in addition to the daily bulletins you receive from herself. I wish I had written before, for you must have felt very anxious to know how the ? the news of the fall of Richmond, and other circumstances which were necessarily very trying and painful to her, and doubly in your absence. We all thought she showed a very remarkable degree of fortitude + strength of character, though all the grief + suspense that she she was obliged to endure. We felt very sorry for her- knowing, too, that we could not prevent her from feeling herself a stranger in a strange land, notwithstanding our wishes and efforts to be kind to her, and make her feel at home.

Since hearing of Gen. Lee’s surrender, + the favorable terms, etc., she has been more cheerful, + brightened up a great deal. Maj. Turner has been a great comfort to her, and has really been as kind and devoted to her as possible_ which of course she has told you constantly.

Hattie disliked the idea of going to Nashville, much as she wishes to see you, + feels the separation from you. Truly the state of society you describe there- the changes amongst your friends + constant discussion of melancholy subjects by those who are left could not have a good effect on the mind of a sensitive young person? I hope you will be able to make your arrangements to leave Nashville after some weeks or months, and that you will consent in the mean time to leave Hattie with us. I say, this without consultation with her- I only know she is disappointed at the idea of your remaining in Nashville, or being obliged to go there herself. I think she is as well contented here as she would be anywhere, separated from you + other near relations_ and we are all fond of her and glad to have her with us. ? wrote to you yesterday, expecting his news on the subject of your residence in Nashville, so I take it for granted that she has exhausted all the arguments against it, and will not attempt to add to them- but surely say that Annie sends her love to you, + that I am

Very sincerely yours

Mary C. Gantt


Washington, 14 Apl./65

The morning Richmond was evacuated, as Gen. Ewell sat with his staff above Manchester watching the progress of the fire, he said to me upon seeing a mill catch fire, ” I begged recommended the Secr of War not to have the city tobacco in the city fired- If I could have had my way it would never have been done.”

The same day or the next, he mentioned that he had prevailed so far as to keep the Tredegar works form being burned

Campbell Brown

Major & A.A.G.

PAC

The arsenal was fired by a mob & contrary to orders from it, most of the fires spread. The first fire the Danville Depot was raised by the mob, who had possession of & were sacking the town_ Mayo’s bridge was fired by incendiaries long before orders were given. none of this is to be published_

C. Brown

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

April 13 1865: “it would be simply lunacy for Dick Ewell to go to Nashville. Whatever you may think of it I donot believe he would be safe from mob violence.”

Item Description: Letter from Thomas T. Gantt  to his cousin Lizinka Campbell Ewell. He advise her not to bring Richard Ewell or Campbell Brown to Nashville once they were paroled. Richard Ewell and Campbell Brown were captured by Federal troops on 6 April 1865 at the Battle of Saylor’s Creek.

18650413_0118650413_02

Item Citation: Folder 12, in the Polk, Brown, and Ewell Family Papers, #605, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

St. Louis Ms. April 13, 1865

Mrs Lisunka C. Ewell

Care of F.b. Fogg Esq Nashville. Tennessee

My dear Lyzinka,

I have justrec’d yours of the 9th postmarked 11th inst. You are shamfully wrong in supposeing that one can go by rail from St. Louis to Nashville in 20 hours. Some year ago it took 15 hour to get to Louisville then a dely of ten hours there- then a journey of some ten hours more. It is simple madness to put the nohow of such a jonney into your daughter’s head. The Boat is infinitely better; but according to my judgment. Harriot had for better stay where she is and it would be simply lunacy for Dick Ewell to go to Nashville. Whatever you may think of it I donot believe he would be safe from mob violence. I have taken every step which I can in Dick’s behalf. But It will not be expedient forhimeven tovisit St. Louis. And Nashville is plainly far worse than this place. New York City is the only place in the U.S. where you can safely meet Dick- Hshould advise you going to Canada forthe present if he is released from confinement for which strong exceptions are being made. You scheme of remaining in Nashville I cannot approve, for one day longer than is absolutely necessary forthesecurity of your property and I do not think your personal presence is necessary for that end: but I do presume toadvise on this socre. Iwon to say however let Hallie remain where she is and do not attempt to call either Dick or Campbell to Nashville at present. Ihanded your check to Major Turner. He wants your signature, write it on a piece of paper, enclosed in your next letter, so small that if it falls into wrong hands it cannot beused for any wrong end. Write your name on a piece then trim with a pair scissors trim away the paper so that only the signature & a very small margin will remain- I am very busy and wantowrite more, but I cannot repair from saying how pleased Iam that Hattie perceives that we mean to be kind to her. Yours very sincerely, ThT. Gantt

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off

12 April 1865: “Owing to events in his own country Genl Alexander desires to exercise his talents in some other”

Item Description: Letter dated 12 April 1865 from William Nelson Pendleton to the Emperor of Brazil. He writes regarding Edward Porter Alexander’s abilities and recommending him for the service in the Brazilian army following the defeat of the Confederate Army.

18650412_0118650412_02

Item Citation: Folder 22b, Edward Porter Alexander Papers, #7, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Hd. Qr. Arty. Corps. Ar. N. Va

Confed. States of America

April 12th 1865

To His Highness

The Emperor of Brazil

Sir.

Permit me to introduce to you and commend to your confidence Brig. Genl. E.P. Alexander for the last four years an active & efficient officer in the armies of the Confederate States.

Owing to events in his own country Genl Alexander desires to exercise his talents in some other, and he selects your as presenting important advantages.

I can confidently recommend the General as an officer of very superior ability and merit. You will find him full of intelligence, scientific culture, & practical skill. He has here commanded with eminent success a large force of artillery, and is capable of directing in the most distinguished manner that branch of service. He is also sagacious and trained engineer, and qualified for great usefulness in that capacity. Indeed, both as a soldier, a man of genius & service worthy of honorable employment + entitled to your fullest confidence.

I have the honor to be

very respectfully yr. Obd. Servt.

W. N. Pendleton

Brig. Genl. & Chief of Artillery.

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , | Comments Off

11 April 1865: “your favor to its defenseless inhabitants generally”

Item Description: Letter dated 11 April 1865 from Zebulon B. Vance to General William T. Sherman authorizing the surrender of Raleigh. He requests protection for many vulnerable entities of the city.

18650411_01

Item Citation: Folder 2, Cornelia Phillips Spencer Papers, #683, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

State of North Carolina,
Executive Department,
Raleigh, April 11th, 1865

Genl Wm T. Sherman
Commanding U.S. Tenn

General

His Honor, Mayor Wm Harrison, is authorized to surrender to you the city of Raleigh. I have the honor to request the extension of your favor to its defenseless inhabitants generally; and especially to ask your protection for the charitable Institutions of the State located here, filled as they are with unfortunate inmates, most of whose natural protectors would be unable to take care of them, in the event of their destruction.
The Capitol of the State with its Libraries, Museum and most of the public records, is also left in your power. I can but entertain the hope that they may escape mutilation or destruction in as much as such evidences of learning and taste could advantage neither party in the prosecution of the war whether destroyed or preserved.

I am General
Very Respectfully

Z. B. Vance

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

11 April 1865: “Should the future offer no chance of service in our cause, I trust you will take to some other country that zeal, intelligence, energy, and courage which have so illustrated the brief history of this.”

Item Description: Letter dated 11 April 1865 from General James Longstreet to General Edward Porter Alexander from Gen. Longstreet. Longstreet writes to commend Alexander on his service throughout the war.

18650411_0218650411_03

Item Citation: Folder 22b, Edward Porter Alexander Papers, #7, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Head Qurs.  1st Army Corps.

April 11 1865

General

The sad events of the past few days have made necessary the severance of our military connection; I cannot allow us to separate though, without expressing my high sense of your most distinguished services in the cause, and the obligations I am under to you for ? ? always so cheerfully and ably rendered me.

As an engineer in the field, I regard you as without a superior in our service; As an Artillery officer, and as my Chief of Artillery, your name stands conspicuous amongst those who have most distinguished themselves on the battle field.

In another way also have you made your Country your debtor, I mean in the practical purposes to which you have applied your high scientific acquirements.

Hardly a branch of the Confederate Military service which has not benefitted by your efforts.

Should the future offer no chance of service in our cause, I trust you will take to some other country that zeal, intelligence, energy, and courage which have so illustrated the brief history of this.

I am General

Very truly yr. friend

J Longstreet

To

Brig Genl E.P. Alexander

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , | Comments Off

10 April 1865: “the conviction had become established in the minds of a large majority of our best officers, + men that the army in its extremely reduced state could not be extricated from its perilous condition”

Item description: Three items from the day after the surrender at Appomattox Court House. The first is a paroled prisoner’s pass. Upon surrender, Confederate soldiers received paroles allowing them to return home without fear of arrest as long as they did not take up arms against the United States. The second is a note from General Lee reporting on E. P. Alexander’s character and skill during his service for the confederate army. This item he planned to take with him to Brazil. The last item is a report of operations of artillery under his command from April 1st to April 10th 1865. It details many of the events in Virginia that affected the artillery and eventually led to surrender.

18650410_01 18650410_02

Item citation: From Folder 2, in the William D. Alexander Diary, #2478-z, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription: 

Appatomattox Court House, Va.,
April 10, 1865

THE BEARER W. D. Alexander Pres of Co. “C” 31 Regt. of N. C. Troop, a Paroled Prisoner of the Army of Norther Virginia, has permission to go to his home, and remain undisturbed.

JN Bist Maj. Comdg Regt.

[On Reverse]

28 Apr Coffee + Tobacco
C.H Eleus Cpl + aces

 

 

18650410_03 18650410_04

Item Citation: From Folder 22a, in the Edward Porter Alexander Papers, #7, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription:

Hd. Qrs. Armies of the Confederate States
Appomattox Co. Ho. Va.
10th April 1865

Brig. Genl. E. P. Alexander has served for the last few years with the Army of Northern Virginia, and has proved himself a skilful artillerist and brave and energetic officer. Being an educated military engineer, he has performed duties in that branch of the service as usefully as in that of the artillery. In morals, character and deportment he is unexceptionable. as in zeal, intelligence and attention to duty he is distinguished.

R. E. Lee
Gen’l

[On Reverse]

From Genl Lee
Given me to take to Brazil

 

18650410_05 18650410_06 18650410_07 18650410_08 18650410_09 18650410_10

Item Citation:  From Folder 44, in the William Nelson Pendleton Papers, #1466, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription:

Hd Qrs Arty. Corps. A. W. Va. Apl. 10th 1865,
day after surrender

Colonel

I have the honour to submit the following report of the operations of the artillery under my command from the 1st day of April to the present time. Much to my regret it has to be made without possible accep. as will be seen from the circumstances of the case to special report from those superior offices of this important arm, A. L. Long, Chief of arty. 2nd Corps., Genl. E.P. Alexander. During the demonstrations of the enemy on the right of our lines near Petersburg on the morning of the 1st Apl. I ordered seven guns of Rogues’ Battalion, which had been held in reserve near Howletts to march to Petersburg, & on the night of the 1st by direction of the Comndg General, I ordered the remainder of the Battalion down; at the same time ordered the guns which had arrived during the day to proceed on the road towards the right, so as to be out of sight of the tower by dawn. Those guns were used with good effect – near Mr Farnbulls house (Genl Lee Hd Qrs) – on the morning of the 2nd when the enemy had unexpectedly massed a heavy force agains the opposite portion of our line – While these guns were well contesting the ground + holding the enemy in check. Lt. Col. Progue arrived with the remainder of his guns, + rendered admirable services in retarding the heavy advance of the enemy until such troops as remained could be withdrawn into the interior line. Three pieces with Maj. Brander were placed on the north side of the Appomattox so as to annoy the left flank of the enemy + prevent him from escaping. On the line, + to the right of the Cox road, were placed four pieces of the Horse Arty. under Str. Col. Chew + Maj. Breatted. The enemy had by this time, 12 o clock, fully established his line from Fort Gregg to the Appomattox river. In the fighting attendant upon these operation, various batteries of the 3rd Corps were caputred. The conduct of Officers + men were mostly of all praise; And that of the River, + supernumeraries of the artillery had been by Genl. Walker armed with muskets, deserves special mention. Those in Fort Gregg fought until literally crushed by numbers, + scarcely a man survived.

In the meantime the firing on Col. Jones’ front, east of the city, had been severe. During the night of the 1st the fire from mortars + guns was incessant, + the men were very much exposed throughout the 2nd. I saw Col. Jones on the line about 3 o clock, + found his pieces so disposed as effectively to prevent any attempt of the enemy to improve the advantage already gained at the River Salient.

I was at battery 45, during the day, + directed its guns against columns of the enemy moving down the valley towards the Weldon R. Road. The officers in charge of this part of the line deeming an attack imminent, I ordered two pieces of artillery to strengthen the position.

In obedience to orders from the Commdg Genl. I ordered the withdrawal of all the guns at 8 o clock PM. This was accomplished with great sccess. And although the difficulties in Col Jones’ lines were very great he succeeded in withdrawing all but about ten, which for the most part were not provided with horses + not intended to be removed. Several mortary were also brought off. Every piece that was abandoned was first debated. After making all necessary arrangements with regard to this movement, + seeing all the guns safely across the river, about 2 AM on the 3rd I moved on by the Hickory Road, marching all night.

The march on the 3rd was fatiguing + very slow, on account of the immense number cassions with the army. At night I ? on the road side about 9 miles from Goodes bridge. I reached Amelia C.H. on the morning of the 4th + immediately proceeded to make arrangement for reducing the arty with the troops to a proportionate quantity. + properly to dispose of the surplus. These arrangements were at last affected. For the 5th Genl. Walker moved to the right, + west of the line of march of the Army, having in charge all the artillery not needed with the troops. Ninety five caissons, mostly loaded, which had saved in the winter been sent to the rear from Petersburg, were destroyed.

Moving on past Amelia Springs by 10 o clock the next morning, 6th, we reached Rices’ Station on the S.S.R.R. Our troops here went into line, + I chose positions for guns commanding the Banksville road + sweeping the ground to its left. On this line there was heavy skirmishing during the evening, but no attack by the enemy.

The enemy’s cavalry meanwhile having attacked our wagon train about two miles back on the road, I ahappening to be with the Commdg Genl when he received information to prevent any farther loss in that quarter. On the way I met a few wearied men of Harris’ brigade, + taking from them some twenty volunteers proceeded with them to the road where the train had been attacked. While attempting to reduce some of the property most valuable I discovered a line of the enemy in a thick pine road, + supposing it to be but a small brg, I arranged for an attack upon them and of Genl Cooke’s regiment which had just reported to me in consequences of a message previously sent to the commdg Genl. This regiment was unable to hold its ground. + fell back some half a mile on the same road until reinforced by two regiments of cavalry. They then again moved forward, but after regaing the original advanced position, the infantry was recalled by Genl. cooke, + the cavalry, by my direction fell backwith some few prisoners they had secured. The enemy meantime had fired on trains to prevent us from saving anything. The enemy now seemed disposed to quiet, and nothing apparently remaining to be accomplished by the small force with me, I directed it slowly to withdraw towards our main body near the station, + returned myself in that direction. Not long after the enemy made a sudden rush, + succeeded for a time in running down our small cavalry force + threatening the unprotected rear of our lines. OUr cavalry regiment, however, speedily rallied, charged in turn, + inflated merited punishment upon their greatly outnumbered assailants.

Shortly after night closed our guns were withdrawn, + we moved on the Farmville road, reaching Farmville early on the morning of the 7th.

As we were leaving Farmville, by the bridges there crossing the Appomattox, the enemy pressed up close after our rear guard, and guns were placed in position, and used to good purpose, on the heights north of the river. Guns were again used with effect a mile or two farther on, when Genl Gordon (then Commdg 2nd Corps, with the justly honored Genl A. L. Long by Ch. of arty.), pressed back the enemy line from near the road along which all our wagons were passing, so as to allow these to get well on their way. This position was held all day. And it was not until midnight that the column worked on the road toward Buckingham C. H. IN spite of the terrible roads quite a long march was affected, + the enemies of the 8th saw the head of our column near Appomattox C.H.- I pushed on in person to communicate with Genl Walker, + found him with his command parked about two miles beyond the C.H. on the road to Appomattox Station. S.S.R.R. – while I was with him an attack wholly unexpected was made by the enemy on his defenceless camp. To avery immediate disaster from this attack demanded the exercise of all our enemies. it was, however, atonce effectivally repelled byt he aid especially of the two gallant Arty Companies of Captain Walker + Dickerson under command of the former, which being at the time unequipped as artillisty were armed with muskets as a guard. They met the enemy’s sharp shooters in a brushwood near, + enabled a number of Genl Walker’s pieces to play with effect while the remainder of his train was withdrawn. After a sharp skirmish this attack seemed remedied, and I started back, having received by courier a not requesting my presence with the Commdg Genl. when I had reached a point a few hundred yards from the C.H. the enemy’s cavalry, which had under cover of dusk gained the road, came rushing along firing upon all in the road, + I only escaped being shot or captured by leaping my horse over the fence + skirting for some distance along the left of that road towards our column these advancing, + until I reached a point beyond where the enemy’s charge was checked.

While these operations were in progress there was several noises of aping upon the S.S. R.R. Twas this circumstances, and from the enemy’s using artillery in the attack above described, I became satisfied that the attacking brg, while had at first seemed to me small, was a large + accumulating force. An dthe inferences became inevitable that Genl. Walker + his gusn must be if they had not already been caputred. These fact + inferences were reported to the Commdg Genl. on my reaching his Hd. Qrs. About 1 AM of the 9th.

Movements at day light confirmed all that had been thus inferred. The enemy was found in heavy force on our front, and dispositions were promptly made for a fierce encounter. The artillery participated with alacrity with calvary + infantry in a spirited attack upon the enemy’s advancing columns + promptly succeeded in arresting their advance. Two guns were captured from the enemy, + a number of prisoners taken. But in spite of this, the conviction had become established in the minds of a large majority of our best officers, + men that the army in its extremely reduced state could not be extricated from its perilous condition, surrounded by the immense force of the enemy, + without subsistence for men or animals, unless with frightful bloodshed, + scarcely any possible purpose; as its remnant, if they resewed must be too much suffered(?) for efficient services. In view, of these convictions, known of in part by him, + of all the facts before his own mind, the Cmmdg Genl before the battle has ? extensively made arrangements for arresting hostilities. By the respective Commander in Chief made possible our surrender we then agreed upon. And as soon thereafter as practicable, articles in detail were adjusted by a commissioner of offices, of surrender having been agreed upon to the respective commanding in Chief, the artillery was withdrawn in common with the other Gordon Chief of 2nd Corps, + the Genl Chief of artillery. In accordance with stipulation, they adjusted troops and has all been signed in due form turned over to the the artillery was withdrawn as the other troops; and it was as soon as practicable enemy

I have the honor to be
Respy yr Obdt. Servt.
W.N. Pendleton
Brig. Genl + Ch of Arty.

Lt. Col. W. H. Tayler
A. A. G.

of 250 field pieces belong to the army on the lines near Richmond + Petersbur only 61 remaine d+ 13 Caissons

 

[on reverse]

Hd. Qrs.
Artillery corps.
Army of N. Va.
Apl. 10, 1865

Brg. – Genl.
W.N. Pendleton

Report of operations of artillery under his command from Arl 1st to Apl 10th 1865.  

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

9 April 1865: “I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of N. Va on the following terms”

Item Description: Letter from General Ulysses S. Grant to Robert E. Lee laying out the terms of surrender for the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House.

18650409_01

Item Citation: Folder 22b, in the Edward Porter Alexander Papers, #7, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Hd Qrts Armies United States

Appomattox C.H. Va

Apl 9th 1865

 

Genl R E Lee

Comdg C.S.A.

 

Genl

In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of 8th inst, I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of N. Va on the following terms, to wit.

Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate. One copy to be given an officer to be designated by me, the other to be reclaimed as such officer or officer you may designate.

The officers to give their individual parole not to take up arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged. And each company or Regtl commander to sign alike parole for the men of their commands.

The Arms Artillery and public property to be parked stacked and turned over to the officers appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side arms of the officers nor the private horses or baggage. This done each officer and man will be allowed to returned to their homes not to be disturbed by the United State authorities, as long as they observe their parole and the laws in force where they may reside.

Very respty

U.S. Grant

Lt Genl

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off

8 April 1865: “Lee’s attack on Grant’s lines”

Item Description: These pages from Harper’s Weekly newspaper published on April 8th, 1865 contain images depicting events from the war. The articles shows update readers on the War in North Carolina and tell of Lee’s final attack on Grant’s lines in Petersburg, Virginia and provides some first hand description of the events as told through a dispatch sent to the newspaper from General Parke.

18650408_01 18650408_02

Item Citation: From Flat Box 7, in the North Carolina County Photographic Collection #P0001, North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription: 

LEE’S ATTACK ON GRANT’S LINES.

On Saturday, March 25, early in the morning, four of Lee’s division, under General Terry, attacked Meade’s right before Petersburg. They had at first a partial success, capturing Fort Stedman and a portion of the line adjacent. They failed, however, in an attempt on Fort Haskell. The attempt of the Federal troops to regain Fort Stedman appear to have been unsuccessful at first, but finally the enemy was repulsed with great loss in killed wounded, and prisoner. The following dispatch from General Parke given the details of the fight:

CAPE POINT, VIRGINIA – 1:30 P.M., March 30, 1865.
Hn. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War:

The following dispatch of General Parke is received from General Meade. U. S> Grant, Lieut-General.

The enemy attacked my front this morning at about 4:00 o’clock, with three divisions, under command of General Terry.

By a sudden rush they seized the line held by the Third Brigade. First Division, at the foot of the hill to the right of Fort Stedman, wheeled and overpowering the garrison took possession of the fort.

They established themselves up on the hill, turning our guns upon us.

Our troops on either flank stood firm.

Afterward a determined attack was mad upon Fort Haskell, which was checked by McLaughlin’s Brigade, Willpock’s division, and was repulsed with great loss to the enemy. The First Brigade of Hurtrauff’s division, held in reserve, was brought up, and a check given to any further advance.

One or two attempts were made to retake the hill, and were only temporarily successful, until the arrival of the Second Brigade, when a charge was made by that brigade aided by the troops of the First Division on each flank, and the enemy were driven out of the fort with the loss of a number of prisoners, estimated about 1000. Two basic flags have been brought in.

The enemy also bet heavily in killed outside of our lines.

The whole line was immediately reoccupied, and then ? retaken uninjured.

I regret to add that General McLaughlin was captured at Fort Stedman

Only loss otherwise was not heavy.

Great praise is due to Hurtrauff for gallantry displayed in handling his division, which behaved with great skill in its first engagement.

JOHN G. PARKE, MAJOR-GENERAL

 

Posted in North Carolina Collection | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off