1 July 1864: “A negro man named Sam called at my house this morning, who says he was freed from his master’s farm in Mecklenburg (Dr. Burwell) by the Yankees this Sunday and was with them till Tuesday when he made his escape and is now trying to make his way home.”

Item Description:  A note dated 1 July 1864, from Blanche W. Sydnar to George W. Burwell, a physician, planter, and businessman of Mecklenburg County, Va., with the news of Sam, claiming that he had been forced from George’s home by Yankees, had arrived at her house and that she had written him a pass to get home.18640701_01a 18640701_02aItem Citation:  Letter dated 1 July 1864, in the George W. Burwell Papers #4291, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription:

A negro man named Sam called at my house this morning, who says he was freed from his master’s farm in Mecklenburg (Dr. Burwell) by the Yankees this Sunday and was with them till Tuesday when he made his escape and is now trying to make his way home. I gave him something to eat and sent him on with two others belonging to Capt. Watkins & [?] Davis.

Blanche W. Sydnar

P.S. My husband, Rev. T. W. Sydnar is now at home, but I consented to give Sam a pass, hoping he may get home safely.

B.W.S.

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Comments Off

30 June 1864: “The rebels still hold this big hill in our front, and there seems no disposition on the part of our Generals to hurry them off.”

Item Description:  Letter, dated 30 June 1864, from George Hovey Cadman to his wife. Cadman (fl. 1862-1864) was a soldier in the 39th Ohio Infantry Regiment during the Civil War.

[Item transcription available below images.]

18640630_01 18640630_02

Item Citation:  From the George Hovey Cadman Papers, #122, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription:

In the field,
Foot of Kennesaw Mountain.
June 30, 1864
 
My ever dear Wife:
 
Our regiment is out on picket and the skirmish line, but Capt. Orr ordered me to remain in to do some writing. It seems to me that I shall have the clerking to do again, as usual, but I am used to it and don’t mind it as much as I used to do. 
 
By the end of next month a great many of our officers will have left the service, as well as a great many of our men, and our regiment will be pretty small. What may take place then I can’t say, but suppose some of the regiments will be consolidated. I hope Capt. Orr will remain with us, but expect he is going to leave. 
 
The rebels still hold this big hill in our front, and there seems no disposition on the part of our Generals to hurry them off. It is the strongest natural fortification I have ever seen, and if they have food and ammunition, they may hold out for a long time, but I think when they do move, we shall take a great many prisoners.  When they start from here I think the campaign will be virtually over, for they will hardly make another stand this side of the river, and the report is we shall not cross the river this campaign, but use the hot months in securing our lines of communication. 
 
The weather is intensely hot. I have not used my blanket for several nights. I just lie down on the ground anywhere and sleep till I wake.
 
If you can I would like you to send me some word of Carrie’s husband, whether he is still in the service.  I have not heard from him since the sinking of the Conestoga.
 
You ask whether I want money. I do want a little to pay for my washing. I paid my last dime day before yesterday for washing my shirt and drawers. A few weeks ago I asked you to send me a few ten cent chips, but suppose you did not get the letter. I lost one of my check shirts at the hospital. I gave it to a nigger to wash, and never saw him or the shirt after. But I got one from a man in our company who wears the same kind.
 
A lad in Co. G who was wounded in the leg by a piece of shell is going home for sixty days. I believe, Esther, I would be willing to take his wound to get home, and shall not forget the lesson easily. And, my dear I hope you keep your spirits up, and do not allow yourself to worry or fret over my absence.  Kiss Phil for me; how I would like to see his little round fat face once more. Tell him Pa often thinks of him. Remember me to George, ask him to write and tell me all the news and how he likes his place.
 
Please remember me to all my friends. Tell them they must not be offended if I do not write to them, but I have not the opportunity. I should be very glad to get a letter from any of them who wold take the trouble to write to me.
 
And now, my ever dear wife, I must once more bid you adieu, and that God may bless you and our dear children is the constant prayer of
 
Your affectionate husband,
George H. Cadman

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , | Comments Off

29 June 1864: “It would amuse you to notice the sounds of the different shells. The Rodman gives a sharp snap like a thunderbolt striking when it is fired, and the shell whizzes through the air like the sound of a locomotive at full speed.”

Item Description:  Letter, dated 29 June 1864, from George Hovey Cadman to his wife. Cadman (fl. 1862-1864) was a soldier in the 39th Ohio Infantry Regiment during the Civil War.

[Item transcription available below images.]

18640629_01

Item Citation:  From the George Hovey Cadman Papers, #122, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription:

June 29th.
 
Gen. Sherman rode along our lines this morning. Gen. Dodge seems to think the campaign can not last much longer. I have been busy all the morning with company accounts, but it is not very pleasant work, for about thirty yards in our rear is a battery containing two Rodman guns and two twenty pound Parrotts. Some of the shells are not perfect, and burst over our heads as soon as they leave the cannon.
 
It would amuse you to notice the sounds of the different shells. The Rodman gives a sharp snap like a thunderbolt striking when it is fired, and the shell whizzes through the air like the sound of a locomotive at full speed. Some of them growl, some make a spluttering noise like a flock of large birds. There is on gun the boys call “the old hound” because it howls like a bloodhound, and there is another casemated battery the boys call “the sneaks,” because you can’t hear the report of the gun when it is fired till the shell flies over you. Yesterday the rebels had the impudence to open a battery on us and fired two guns, but before they could fire a third, at least twenty or thirty guns were brought to bear an the gunners did not stop long. It was the prettiest artillery practice I have seen yet.
 
We could not lift our heads above the works without the almost certainty of being shot, and as there was no chance to return the fire, it was no use to risk it. After the spat was over, it was amusing to hear our men ridiculing the rebs, and they back again. The night was so still and clear that voices could be heard for a considerable distance. The jokes were all in good humor, but it did seem strange for men who only five minutes before were trying to take each others lives, to be laughing and joking with each other. The rebel sharpshooters have some very good rifles of English make, Whitworths, that beat anything we have in our army. It is said they will kill at a thousand yards. It is a great advantage to them, as a fellow can dig a hole, get into it, and fire away with impunity.
 
If you do not send word that you are tired of these rambling letters, I shall send you one every few days, but if they should cease for a week or two, do not be uneasy, as circumstances may turn up to hinder me from writing. Wishing you, my love, all health and happiness, I remain my dear wife, 
 
Your affectionate husband,

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , | Comments Off

28 June 1864: “You see, my love, that death is no respecter of persons, and that old and young die, at home as well as on the battlefield.”

Item Description: Letter, dated 28 June 1864, from George Hovey Cadman. Cadman (fl. 1862-1864) was a soldier, 39th Ohio Infantry Regiment, during the Civil War.

[Item transcription available below images.]

18640628_01

18640628_02

Item Citation:  From the George Hovey Cadman Papers, #122, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription:

Tuesday, June 28
 
Yesterday was one of the most trying days we have had since we commenced investing this mountain, and I believe more lives were lost than on any other day. We, that is, our brigade, were awaiting orders the greater part of yesterday to storm the face of the mountain opposite.
 
Two regiments were sent up as skirmishers:  the 64th Illinois and the 66th Illinois. They were all day trying to advance, but I do not think they gained more than a hundred yards. The 64th lost some 60 men in killed and wounded. I think our generals have given up the idea of storming from this side. This is the seventeenth day since we formed in line of battle in front of this place. The weather is very hot, and it is almost impossible to endure the middle of the day.
 
Tuesday evening, 6 o’clock.
 
My dear wife:
 
I have just received your letter of the 20th, with an account of the death of Mary Giffin. You see, my love, that death is no respecter of persons, and that old and young die, at home as well as on the battlefield.
 
Our company is dwindling fast through sickness. Quite a number of our men are sick but I am glad to say that I am getting stout again. Tonight I am on the Color Line guard, and shall be from one til daylight. It is now getting closer to sundown and I must leave off for the night. I shall think of you a good many times as I stand and listen to the firing of the skirmishers. When you see Will Giffin give my respects to him and tell him that I deeply sympathize with him in the loss of his sister. I wish he was healthy enough to be out here, If he was fond of fighting he would find enough of it here. I have seen more of war this campaign than in all the rest of my soldiering.

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , | Comments Off

27 June 1864: “…I told you that our company was then on the skirmish line but none of our boys had been brought in, and I supposed they were all safe. Alas, it was not so. We lost one of our best men, Corporal McFarland.”

Item Description:  Letter, dated 27 June 1864, from George Hovey Cadman to his wife Esther. Cadman (fl. 1862-1864) was a soldier in the 39th Ohio Infantry Regiment during the Civil War.

[Item transcription available below images.]

18640627_01a

Item Citation:  From the George Hovey Cadman Papers, #122, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription:

In the field, foot of Kennesaw Range, Ga.,
Monday, June 27, 1864.
 
My dear Wife:
 
With a heavy heart I begin this letter.  In the one I sent you yesterday I told you that our company was then on the skirmish line but none of our boys had been brought in, and I supposed they were all safe. Alas, it was not so. We lost one of our best men, Corporal McFarland.  He had moved from the rifle pit his squad was defending and was not missed particularly till the company was relieved last night, when he did not answer to his name. His body was discovered this morning not more than five paces from his post. We could not get him then as the rebel rifles covered the spot, but tonight we shall try to get his body and give him a soldier’s burial.
 
We also had a man wounded in the company, Ben Smith, he is a young fellow about 19, living near the California bridge over the Little Miami. He is single, but poor McFarland leaves a wife and I believe 7 children to lament his loss.

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

26 June 1864: “Our regiment is in more danger from our own battery in the rear than from the rebels in front.”

Item description: Letter, dated 26 June 1864, from George Hovey Cadman, a soldier in the 39th Ohio Infantry Regiment, to his wife Esther.

[Item transcription available below images.]

18640626_01 18640626_02

Item citation: From folder 10 in George Hovey Cadman Papers (#122), Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item transcription:

Sunday, June 26.

I told you yesterday that Col. Noyes was very anxious to storm the mountain, but that Gen. Fuller feared some trap. For thirty-six hours they kept their artillery masked, and showed nothing but a heavy line of skirmishers, evidently thinking we would advance, but finding suckers did not bite well, yesterday morning they threw off all disguise and opened on us with a full volley of shell. I don’t think Col. Noyes wants to storm it as badly as he did. Could he have had his way, our regiment would have been sacrificed to whisky and ambition. Since our return from furlough he has not been the same man he was before. When we made the reconnaissance at Resaca before the fight, he was so drunk he did not know what he was doing, and he has been the worse for liquor several times since. The boys are getting perfectly down on him. Fortunately he leaves next month when his three years are up. But keep this to yourself or you may get me into trouble.

Last night our company with three others was detailed on the skirmish line. I thought I would have to go too, but Capt. Orr ordered me to remain in and make out our muster and pay rolls. This is the first clerking I have had to do since he has been with the company, and I was in hopes I was done with it.

I don’t believe Johnnie Reb can stop in front of us much longer. He must either evacuate, surrender or fight, shortly, for we command the railroad between here and Marietta, and he can not run any more trains with supplies.

3 P.M.

Everything has been very quiet today, considering. There has not been much cannonading, and I was very glad of it, for it is not very pleasant to sit writing when the shells are whizzing over your head. Our regiment is in more danger from our own battery in the rear than from the rebels in front. Sometimes the fuse is defective, and the shell bursts almost as soon as it leaves the gun. None of our boys have been brought in from the skirmish line yet, so I suppose they are all right. We have not had a man hurt yet from our company in this campaign though some of them have been hit. We have had but one many die of sickness, so I think we have been fortunate.

And now let me conclude these rambling notes by assuring you of my love and my earnest desire for the war to come to an end, that we may pass the remainder of our lives together in peace and happiness.

Your affectionate husband,

GH Cadman

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , | Comments Off

25 June 1864: “I believe we shall find in the end that our re-enlistment was not legal. I do not care, anyhow.”

Item description: Letter, dated 25 June 1864, from George Hovey Cadman, a soldier in the 39th Ohio Infantry Regiment, to his wife Esther.

[Item transcription available below images.]

 18640625_01

18640625_02

18640625_03

Item citation: From folder 10 in George Hovey Cadman Papers (#122), Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item transcription:

Saturday, June 25.

A great change has taken place on our front. Night before last the rebels moved all their cannon from our front and during the whole of yesterday nothing was visible but a strong line of skirmishers. Col. Noyes was anxious to make a charge up the mountain, but Gen. Fuller feared some trick. Some of the flanking skirmishers reported that they gained a position whence they had a view of a part of the area of the mountain, and reported the rebels as thick as flies on a sugar barrel. They had withdrawn out of sight, hoping we might make a charge, when, on account of the nature of the position, they could destroy us in detail, for we never could form till we got to the top, if we ever got there. The general impression now is that we must either flank them out or siege them out.

There is another stir in camp about the veteran business. There has been another order from the War Department on the subject, and I believe we shall find in the end that our re-enlistment was not legal. I do not care, anyhow. One thing is certain: in that case I have not much over a year to serve, as I shall never enlist for I do not think my constitution would stand it. Another thing: I am gradually getting a dislike for it and long for the comforts of home.

I have no news for today, and must close till tomorrow. Give my love to the children, and when you write, send me all the news. Two or three letters back, I asked you to send me a little money in 10c shinplasters. Don’t know whether you received it.

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , | Comments Off

24 June 1864: “…and as to taking off one’s shoes, that’s not to be dreamed of.”

Item description: Letter, dated 24 June 1864, from George Hovey Cadman, a soldier in the 39th Ohio Infantry Regiment, to his wife Esther.

[Item transcription available below images.]

18640624_01 18640624_02

Item citation: From folder 10 in George Hovey Cadman Papers (#122), Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item transcription:

In the field, Kennesaw Mountain, Ga.
Friday, June 24, 1864.

My dear Wife:

Again I sit down to my daily pleasure of writing a few lines to you. Let me know when you write how you like this style of letter. It is the most convenient way for me as I can often find five minutes to spare where I could not get an hour. Besides we have very little notice of when the mail is going away but this way I am always ready for it.

After I had sent yesterday’s letter we had another artillery fight, and a heavy one; such a noise as one can imagine but can’t describe. To the roar of cannon and roll of musketry which beats any thunderstorm I ever heard, add the shouting of men, the whistling of round shot, the shrieking and bursting of shell, and the hissing of rifle balls, and you have such a pandemonium as Milton never dreamed of.

After the artillery I was detailed on Head Quarters Guard, but just as I had my traps all ready to start with the squad for Hd. Qrs. the Greybacks mad a charge on our skirmish line. Of course we had to get into our breastworks to be ready for an assault. They drove back part of the line to our right, but on our front everything stood firm, and after half an hour’s hard fighting they simmered down. One of our Co. A boys was wounded and did not live through the night.

Last night Head Quarters Guard, the night before before Color Line Guard, and if I am relieved soon enough this evening, I shall be on picket. I tell you, Esther, that’s coming it pretty heavy. It’s enough to wear any man out. I shall be glad when we get away from here. A fellow has no chance to look about. Thick woods on flank and rear, and a mountain in front with cannon on the top and Johnny Reb behind the cannon don’t form a very inviting prospect. Besides this, being in front to have to wear our cartridge boxes both day and night, eating, drinking and sleeping, and as to taking off one’s shoes, that’s not to be dreamed of. But it’s hard on the men. They say a man can get used to anything, and so he may, if he doesn’t die in the seasoning. Numbers of our men who were stout and healthy when we started are worn completely out. Sam Giffin stands it well; nothing seems to hurt him. Jem Myers seems to be picking up now. When we get into a stationary campaign, and can wash our clothes and be clean once more, it will seem almost like home to us.

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

23 June 1864: “How strange it is that where there is most danger there should be most wickedness, but so it is.”

Item description: Letter, dated 23 June 1864, from George Hovey Cadman, a soldier in the 39th Ohio Infantry Regiment, to his wife Esther.

18640622_01a 18640622_02a 18640622_03a

Item citation: From folder 10 in George Hovey Cadman Papers (#122), Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item transcription:

June 23rd.

The general impression now is that this is the last day of fighting here and that the enemy’s display of force yesterday was made merely to cover his retreat. If they leave, I suppose our division will go to the rear and get a little rest. I am sure the men need it.

Last night was a lovely night. The moon and stars shone brightly, and I enjoyed myself very much, lying on the ground talking with my friend George R. Gear on religious subjects. Oh, Esther, I often fear that my thoughts and feelings on these subjects may vanish! I pray God they may prove lasting. I have been much happier since I have been under their influence, but the army is a poor school. How strange it is that where there is most danger there should be most wickedness, but so it is.

I hope, my dear, that you are getting my letters regularly. It must be a comfort to you to know that I am safe so far. I forgot to tell you that with all their cannonading yesterday, not a man was hurt by it in our regiment.

12 at noon, June 23.

We have just been having an artillery duel. Early this morning the bugles ordered our skirmishers to advance. They did so and are now I believe, some three hundred yards up the mountain. The Rebs thought to play a trick on them and sneaked down a few men at a time till they had fully a regiment, with the kind intention of taking some of our men in out of the wet. All this time they kept up a cannonading at one of our forts to draw attention from their design. But they had been close watched and just as their men were ready to fall on ours, some twelve or fourteen guns opened with shell full upon them. You should have seen the Johnnies go up the hill at double quick. This made them mad and they trailed one of their guns on our regiment, which lay in full sight. The first shell burst over our heads and we all thought it was caused by cutting the fuse too short, but the next came closer and we found they had us in fair range. Our officers sent us into the rifle pits to keep us out of harm’s way as much as possible. I had made some beef soup and was getting my dinner, so I stuck in out till I had done eating. Some of their shot were well aimed, but in consequence of our earthworks, no damage was done except breaking two rifles for Uncle Sam, hitting Gen. Dodge’s saddle, and making a hole through the blanket of a Company A. boy. I was not sorry when they tired of their sport at last, for it was too hot to lie crowded in the trenches.

Notice has just been given to send mail in to Head Quarters, so I must close.

Believe me, my dearest love, 

Your affectionate husband,

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , | Comments Off

22 June 1864: “Now people are terribly in earnest. They want the truth. They want nothing more and nothing less.”

Item Description: “Journalism—Misrepresentations of Facts—Appeals to Prejudices among Soldiers, &c., &c.” (editorial), The Daily Journal (Wilmington, N. C.), 22 June 1864.

18640622_01

18640622_02

18640622_03

18640622_04

Transcription:

THE DAILY JOURNAL.
CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA.
WILMINGTON, N. C., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1864.

Journalism—Misrepresentations of Facts—Appeals to Prejudices among Soldiers, &c., &c.

A FRIEND recently remarked to us upon the terrible sameness of the newspapers. From the first to the last column the topic was war.  And he was right.  It is war.  War is in all men’s thoughts and in all men’s mouths.  If any one enquires the news, it is news of the war that he means.  The first part of a paper that is read, is the telegraphic column with dispatches from the battle-field. At the beginning men loved the excitement—they delighted in rumours.  Now people are terribly in earnest.  They want the truth.  They want nothing more and nothing less.  Under those circumstances it appears to us to be the duty of the press to seek that first.  Reports it must give, for the telegraph will bring reports, and rumours, more or less reliable will be received from other quarters.  To sift these rumours, to weigh testimony and to give an intelligent and intelligible resume of occurrences, and of the existing position of affairs, is perhaps the most acceptable service that a journal can render to its readers.

As in matters of news, so in matter of opinion, men seek or ought to seek reality, plain speaking, coolness and candor.  This is no time tor “pitching in,” or pitching out–for making partizan appeals for this man or against that man.  It is no time for appealing to any prejudice, nor for addressing any particular class or calling of men.  A paper is published for the whole community.  Its existence depends upon the supposition that it is so, and that its aim is the public good, for upon no other ground could the exemption of even the few persons engaged in carrying it on be asked for or justified.  Most honestly do we doubt the moral right of Congress to exempt any parties for the purpose of carrying on mere personal organs, engaged almost wholly in the advocacy of personal claims.

These remarks, as applying to such organs in this State, may seem harsh.  But are they correct?—Of course we apply them to the organs, not to the individuals engaged in their manipulation. Different persons may have different ideas of duty, and we concede to others the same right we claim for ourselves.—Still we can not reconcile with our notions of the duty of a journalist the constant effort to present every fact in a partizan light, or to bring forward every circumstance with a direct reference to its bearing upon the political fortunes of some particular individual or candidate.  The public has primary claims upon the press.  It has a right to all the information the press can properly communicate, without coloring or evasion.

Articles addressed to particular interest, appeals to men according to certain assumed classifications, we have always regarded as dangerous in their tendency, and not unfrequently insulting to those they are designed to flatter or cajole.  Freemen in our country may be tall or short, fat or lean, strong or weak, without being any the less freemen. So may they differ in worldly circumstances, and still be equally freemen.  It would be as absurd, as much opposed to the spirit of our institutions, to array the poor against the rich or the rich against the poor, as it would be to array the long men against the short men, or the fat men against the lean men. These are accidents of stature or or worldly circumstances, which in nowise effect the real matter.  What is true and right in itself is true and right by whomsoever it is read and heard, and it would be none the less so were all the world to refuse either to read it or to listen to it. Broad plain truths are useful and wholesome and good for all.  Appeals to classes or sections are dangerous and unpatriotic.—Nay they are insulting, as suggesting the existence of a real or supposed difference and half hinted inferiority, where none such is fairly presumeable.

A good many soldiers—or, speaking more accurately, a good many citizens now in military service, take our paper.  Would that we could publish it at prices that it would render it convenient for more to do so.  Some of our army subscribers are officers ; others, and the large majority, are not.  They are all citizens.  What is for the good of the country is for their good ; what is opposed to the good of the country is opposed to their good.  And, indeed, the converse of this proposition may be regarded as pretty applicable;—the good of the soldiers is the good of the country and the evil of the soldiers is the evil of the country, since the best blood of the whole country is in the army.  Is an army constituted like that of the Confederacy to be regarded or addressed as in any way differing from the country at large of which it forms so important a part?  We think not. We certainly have never supposed so, and have never thought of writing appeals to soldiers as such, upon political matters, and we have regretted to see such appeals coming from any quarter.  Especially have we regretted to see any appeals calculated to awaken prejudices or create antagonisms between citizens holding commissions and citizens not holding commissions.  We all know that all cannot be officers, as we also know that the brunt of battle must fall upon the rank and file, while at the same time the history of the war shows how freely the officers have exposed themselves and offered up their lives for their country upon every occasion. Perfect harmony between officers and men is very essential to the efficiency and well-being of the army, and is, of course, of vital importance to the success of the cause which all are battling for. That anything tending to weaken this harmony, or to create distrusts between persons occupying different positions in the service, can only be productive of evil, every man of common sense will see for himself.

Now, we regret to notice that there is an effort to create such distrust in the ranks of our army—to set the soldiers against the officers and the officers against those who are not officers—to hold out the idea that one candidate for Governor is the friend of the soldier—the private—and that the other is not.  To insinuate that because A. B., who happens to be an officer, chooses to support Gov. VANCE, therefore C. D., who happens to be a private, should waive his own private judgment, and out of blind spite against his officer support Mr. HOLDEN.  We think that the worse than folly of this thing requires only to be pointed out to be condemned.  We will not insult the common sense of any of our readers in or out of the army, whether officers or privates, by arguing such a thing.  Yet such a course of electioneering is carried on, directly and indirectly ; and, we regret to say, not without its effect.— Mr. HOLDEN is represented as the exclusive friend of the private soldier, and a prejudice as between soldiers and officers is sought to be evoked in his behalf. If as package of Standards or Progresses does not reach it destination, it is charged to the tyranny of the officers or the Confederate Government, or some such thing; and this in face of the fact that every paper in the State and out of it receives from its subscribers in the army, and, for that matter out of the army, the same kind of complaints.

We are making no appeal for Governor VANCE nor against Mr. HOLDEN. We are simply objecting to this style of electioneering. It is wrong. It is unjust. It is unpatriotic. It ought not to be resorted to.  We would condemn it, no matter by which side it might happen to be used. It is uncandid.  Both these aspirants for public favor are desirous of the votes of the soldiers and of all others. Let them seek such votes on fair grounds. We will not argue that Governor VANCE is the exclusive friend of the private soldier, although be himself was a private soldier and entered the army as such, and his competitor never did. We will not call in question, Mr. HOLDEN’S reasons for not doing so.  No doubt they were satisfactory to himself.  But in the course of the two men, there is nothing to show that Governor VANCE has neglected the interests of the soldiers, but much to show that he has remembered them.  If Mr. HOLDEN has made any record in this respect, it has been confined to words, and some of these words have appeared to us to be dangerous and unpatriotic.

We have from time to time expressed our preference for Gov. VANCE, and given our reasons for this preference. If these reasons have any force they derive it from considerations apart from anything like appeals to the prejudice of any class, section or party. They are based upon grounds of a public and general character, in which all officers, soldiers and civilians are alike interested. We are sick of appeals and demagogueism.  We should think that the people would also be by this time.  Now, at least, men and measures, candidates and their acts, should be looked at with clear eyes and unwarped judgments.

Item Citation: Journalism—Misrepresentations of Facts—Appeals to Prejudices among Soldiers, &c., &c.” (editorial), The Daily Journal (Wilmington, N.C.), 22 June 1864, page 2, columns 1 and 2. Call number C071 W74j, North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Posted in North Carolina Collection | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off