28 December 1864: “our only pleasure now is in seeing our friends”

Item Description: Entry dated 28 December 1864 from the journal of Fanny Cohen Taylor, describing Northern occupation of Savannah, Georgia. 

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Item Citation: Folder 46, Volume 7, Phillips and Myers Family Papers, #00596Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Wednesday Dec 28th—- Today nothing has occurred worthy of mention. Fanny Levy dined with us and went home early in the afternoon much to our regret for our only pleasure now is in seeing our friends. Dr Ballinger spent the evening with us and we played cards until 10 o’clock– quite the dissipation for the times. 

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27 December 1864: “Discipline, order, energy, and enthusiasm were their leading characteristics”

Item Description: Report by Colonel Jourdan, 158th New York Regiment, to Commander Dove, United States Navy, concerning the expedition to destroy the salt-works near Bear Inlet, North Carolina.

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Item Citation: Expedition to Bear Inlet, N.C. [New York : G. P. Putnam, 1864?]. Cp970.75 D47d. Detached from: Rebellion record, 1864. [Vol. 8 (1864); p. 463-464.] North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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26 December 1864: “If we are Conquered I see no reason why we should receive our enemies as friends”

Item Description: Entry dated 26 December 1864 from the journal of Fanny Cohen Taylor, describing Northern occupation of Savannah, Georgia. 

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Item Citation: Folder 46, Volume 7, Phillips and Myers Family Papers, #00596Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Monday Dec 26th— This is the commencement of another week of unhappiness. I went today to see my grandparents the first time I had left the house and found them very much dispirited, Grandfather being unwell. The weather is warm and damp which always affects old persons  I therefore hope he will be better in a few days. Dr Ballinger spent this evening with us. In the course of the evening Mr Low our neighbor brought a Yankee over to see Father on business and I am sorry to say he was ushered into our family circle and although I did nothing more than bow when he entered he had impertinence enough to ask me to play the piano for him. I, of course, declined the honor and then the evening’s conversation. If we are Conquered I see no reason why we should receive our enemies as friends and I never shall do it so long as I live. Father is very much afraid that I will compromise him by my too open avowal of hatred, but I pray daily that he may be mistaken in his fears. 

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25 December 1864: “This is the saddest Christmas that I have ever spent”

Item Description: Entry dated 25 December 1864, Christmas Day, from the journal of Fanny Cohen Taylor, describing Northern occupation of Savannah, Georgia. 

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Item Citation: Folder 46, Volume 7, Phillips and Myers Family Papers, #00596Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription: 

Dec 25th Sunday- This is the saddest Christmas that I have ever spent and my only pleasure during the day has been in looking forward to spending my next Christmas in the Confederacy. This morning my Uncle Mr. Myers and his daughter Mrs. Yates Levy came to see us and told us of a party given the evening before by the negroes at Genl Geary’s Hd Qrts where the Gen went into the kitchen and desired an introduction to the ladies and gentlemen there assembled. After the introduction he asked who were slaves and who were free. There was but one slave present a servant girl of my Aunt’s who acknowledged the fact. This elegant gentleman enquired into her private history and finding out that she was a married woman begged an introduction to her husband Mr Valentine  He then presented Mr Valentine, as a Christmas gift, with a free wife. The girl was so much amused having always been a favorite servant and treated like one of the family that she told it to her mistress as a good joke. In the afternoon we had a real rebel meeting. Dr R, Fanny Levy, Dr B and our own family forming the party. We abused the Yankees to our hearts content and congratulated ourselves upon being once more together. Dr R– told me of a news paper that had been issued, called “The loyal Georgian” with this Motto “Redeemed, regenerated and disenthralled”– “the Union must and shall be preserved.” This of course created great merriment, the first time I had a hearty laugh since the Goths had been among us. Dr B– spent the evening with us. We are beginning to improve in spirits we did not retire until 10 o’clock. 

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24 December 1864: “he walked out like a well bred dog and I rather think he will not make his appearance again”

Item Description: Entry dated 24 December 1864 from the journal of Fanny Cohen Taylor, describing Northern occupation of Savannah, Georgia. 

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Item Citation: Folder 46, Volume 7, Phillips and Myers Family Papers, #00596Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Saturday Dec 24th_______ Nothing happened this morning worthy of note except the intrusion of a Capt Dunbar on Kiltpatrick Staff who again came for Quarters and as Father was out I was obliged to receive him but did so standing up so that he could have no excuse for remaining longer than his business required him to do. I told him he could probably have our front parlor but as my father was out could not give him a positive answer; in a couple of hours he returned and asked to see me again. I went down to him and he told me the order had been counter manded and he should not require the room. I told him I was glad that we were relieved, when he remarked that he should call again as he wished to become personally acquainted with my Father  I gave him no answer but opened the front door for him and he walked out like a well bred dog and I rather think he will not make his appearance again and I certainly hope from the bottom of my heart- that he has paid his last visit. At two o’clock General Hazen came for Quarters and we have been forced to give him two rooms– our front parlor and a bed room the one we always kept for our friends- it is a hard trial but I suppose we must submit. I used to know this man before the war and I trust for that reason he will treat us with more consideration than some of our friends have received who have been obliged to receive Yankees in their houses. Well! that question is now settled and I hope our annoyance for the present are over, the anticipation however of having them among us is enough to make us prematurely old. 

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23 December 1864: “went to bed early as usual only dreading the disclosures of the morrow.”

Item Description: Entry dated 23 December 1864 from the journal of Fanny Cohen Taylor, describing Northern occupation of Savannah, Georgia. 

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Item Citation: Folder 46, Volume 7, Phillips and Myers Family Papers, #00596Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Dec 23rd____ Mother is quite sick today suffering with one of her attacks of neurelgia brought on I suppose by worry and excitement. It is Sister’s birthday and the saddest I hope of her life for we are all dreadfully depressed not knowing what will happen from day to day  Capt Poe called this morning and I was obliged to receive him and never was so embarrassed in my life. My hatred for the Army in which he was an officer and my desire to be polite made me almost speechless- the contending feelings were more than I could control. He however, conducted himself like a gentleman and offered us all the assistance in his power, but evidently could do nothing for us he had Quarters at Mrs Cheves’ and we knew that our time must soon come and probably we should be compelled to have some brute in our house who would make our life more miserable than it already was. We spent this evening in Mother’s room and went to bed early as usual only dreading the disclosures of the morrow. 

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22 December 1864: “Father had been dreadfully harassed during the morning for his house”

Item Description: Entry dated 22 December 1864 from the journal of Fanny Cohen Taylor, describing Northern occupation of Savannah, Georgia. 

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Item Citation: Folder 46, Volume 7, Phillips and Myers Family Papers, #00596Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

December 22nd 1864

I had gone to bed sick last evening and this morning felt too badly to rise in time for breakfast but feeling better as the day advanced made my appearance at dinner. Father had been dreadfully harassed during the morning for his house and as a friend of ours Col Waddy had told us to apply to Capt Poe, Chief Engineer on Sherman’s Staff, if we required assistance knowing that he would aid us if in his power, he wrote a note to him asking him to come and see him- he not having yet come to town did not reply to it. I have never seen a man so annoyed and unnerved as Father is. At about four o’clock this afternoon Dr Ballinger one of our Confederate Surgeons who had been left in Charge of Hospital No 2 came to see us and that was the first pleasureable moment I had had since these Vandals entered our City. I had been so surrounded by blue Coats that the sight of our grey uniform made me happy for I felt that I had a friend near me, he however, only remained a short time and we then relapse into our usual state of mind, bordering on melancholy. Again we retired at eight o’clock actuated by several motives one of which was to save wood as the weather was unusually cold and the little that we had in the house was being constantly stolen by the Yankees At two o’clock today one of our house servants Henry left us being anxious to enlist in the Federal service. 

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21 December 1864: “the Yankees entered our peaceful little city in a much more orderly way than I anticipated”

Item Description: For the next several days, we will be posting diary entries from Fanny Cohen Taylor as she chronicles the Northern occupation of Savannah, Georgia. Here is her first entry from 21 December 1864.

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Item Citation: Folder 46, Volume 7, Phillips and Myers Family Papers, #00596Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Journal 

Of what occurred during my stay in Savannah while the Yankees had possession of it. 

On Wednesday morning December the 21st the Yankees entered our peaceful little city in a much more orderly way than I anticipated, although of course there were many robberies Committed, the lower classes and the negroes, whom they came to befriend, being the greatest sufferers. They gave three very orderly and unimpulsive cheers when they raised the Flag on the flag staff in the Barracks’ yard and after that military move every thing was comparatively quiet for us until one o’clock when General Howard and his Staff Came in Search of Quarters and liking the appearance of our house gave us until five in the afternoon to vacate it. When Father remonstrated with them and told them there were ladies in the house and it would be exceedingly inconvenient for them to move one of them politely answered “Well! I suppose it will inconvenience you but you know you Rebs will fight and when you are Conquered you must submit to what ever will contribute to our Comfort.” Father, however, by dint of great persuasion enduced them to take an empty house opposite to ours with the promise of allowing them to keep their horses in our stable. That day we were applied to from every source but Father’s management we kept them out of our house; in the evening we went to bed at eight o’clock thoroughly exhausted from the day’s excitement. 

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20 December 1864: “how I wish I were a man and in Georgia”

Item Description: Diary entry dated 20 December 1864 by Sarah Lois Wadley. She writes about rumors she has heard about Sherman’s march through Georgia.

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Item Citation: Folder 5, Sarah Lois Wadley Papers, #01258, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Tuesday, Dec. 20th.
We have had such a long week of warm, cloudy weather; yesterday evening the wind changed to the north and the rain came down in torrents, and we hoped it would clear this morning, but it has kept up a slow, cold drizzle all day.
Mr. Barr passed Sunday evening and left a letter for me from Mrs. Morancy, she says they will expect the children, and insists upon my going up with them, but I cannot do so, I would like it very much if it were best for me to go. She says they have been having concerts and tableaux at Homer for the benefit of our suffering Missouri soldiers, they have already made $3,000. The papers we received yesterday contain very exciting news, we learn that Sherman is down in the heart of Georgia, has passed through Milledgeville, destroying all the public buildings, there are rumours that we have defeated Sherman terribly at Millen; so near Uncle David! Every Georgian is in arms, they mist have passed right by our old Oakland. Oh, I am so excited when I think of it, how I wish I were a man and in Georgia, how I wish I were there anyway, to know what they we doing, to rejoice with our noble Georgians, and with all the brave soldiers who are there fighting for us; for I am sure the Yankees are but marching to their own destruction; it seems to me Sherman’s audacity is unequalled, but he will meet his just reward. Yet though I do thus wish to be as it were on the scene of action, yet it seemed to me yesterday for the first time that I could begin to see a mercy in our being held back from crossing the river, we should probably have been in that part of Georgia which has been made a battle ground.
I read the President’s message this morning, it is indeed fine in every respect, so calm, earnest, eloquent, and bringing all it’s strength from that high faith in right and humanity, and that strong reliance on God which so enobles human nature.
We have finished “The Antiquary,” which we all liked very much of course, and which we shall be talking about for the next week or two; we were interrupted two nights in the most exciting part. Mr. Gordon has been attending to some business for Father, and in return Father undertook to do a part of his tax assessing over here, he was absent three days. The first night Mr. Gordon very unexpectedly came over to stay all night, and we were all highly astonished by a call from Dr. Melton in the evening; the next night as Loring was away, we thought we would wait until Saturday night when Father would be at home. Mr. Gordon came up again Saturday night to see Father, but we read in spite of his visit, and he seemed highly entertained. I have been writing more by feeling than sight for some time, and precious penmanship I have made of it, it is now quite too dark to write any more.

 

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19 December 1864: “will pay $450 per year for Train hands, Firemen and Mechanics”

Item Description: Notice dated 19 December 1864 from the Richmond and Danville Railroad hiring hands at $450 and $400 per annum.

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Item Citation: Folder 7, George W. Burwell Papers, #04291, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Item Transcription:

Richmond and Danville Railroad,

Richmond, Va., Dec 19 1864

Dr Burwell

Sir,

We wish to hire your hands for the ensuing year, (1865,) and will pay $450 per year for Train hands, Firemen and Mechanics, and $400 per year for all others. Please let me hear from you, and state whether you will hire your hands to us at these rates.

Respectfully, yours,

D.C. Bouman

18Mash

In Reply name hands

 

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