Tag Archives: furlough

4 February 1865: “I don’t see any prospect of me ever visiting N. C. while the war lasts unless I am fortunate enough to get wounded.”

Item Description: A letter from Daniel M. Willis, a friend and Civil War companion to George W. Lewis, about why Willis has stayed with his regiment. He expresses his desire to go home, and hopes that George can remember him to … Continue reading

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27 January 1865: “Sometimes I wish I would just get sick enough to get a furlough but it may be wicked for me to wish that”

Item Description: Letter dated 27 January 1865 from Lewis Warlick to Laura Cornelia McGimsey. Warlick was a Second Lieutenant in Company B, 11th Regiment N.C. Troops. Item Citation: Folder 4, Cornelia McGimsey Papers, #02680-z, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University … Continue reading

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13 January 1865: “nothing at all to bother us except the mud”

Item Description: Letter dated 13 January 1865 written by James A. Graham to his mother. Graham, a native of Hillsborough, N.C., served as an officer in Company G (Orange Guards), 27th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, Confederate States of America. Item … Continue reading

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11 October 1864: “I cannot imagine why it was he came home”

Item Description: Diary entry dated 11 October 1864, written by Sarah Lois Wadley. Item Citation: From volume 4 (folder 5) in the Sarah Lois Wadley Papers, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Item … Continue reading

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3 January 1864: “Tha have cut our rashions down to a quarter of a pound of bacon and one pound of flower…”

Item description: Letter, dated 3 January 1863, from Jesse Miller to William and Mary Proffit of Wilkes County, NC.  He describes sickness, cold weather, and food rations in his camp. [transcription available below images] Item citation: From folder 4 in … Continue reading

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23 October 1863: “Be Kind to the Soldier”

Item Description: “Be Kind to the Soldier.” (newspaper editorial) Semi-weekly North-Carolina Standard (Raleigh), 23 October 1863. Transcription: Be Kind to the Soldier. The Editor of the Biblical Recorder, in his account of his recent journey to the Western part of … Continue reading

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17 January 1863: “My only hope for a furlough is to get shot or get sick. This is the misfortune of my promotion.”

Item description: Published letter, dated 17 January 1863, as collected and published in Memoir and Memorials (The Neale Publishing Co., 1907), a memoir of Elisha Franklin Paxton. Elisha Franklin Paxton was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia in 1828. He studied at Washington College … Continue reading

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12 January 1862: “If there is an honorable road to get home, I shall spare no effort to find it as speedily as possible.”

Item description: Letter from Elisha Franklin Paxton to his wife, Elizabeth, dated 12 January 1862. Paxton is frustrated at being denied a furlough while other officers of equal rank have been receiving them. He informs his wife that he is … Continue reading

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26 December 1861: “I was promising myself much happiness in spending a few days with you at New Year’s, and am much grieved that it has to be deferred…”

Item description: Letter from Elisha Franklin Paxton to his wife, Elizabeth, dated 26 December 1861. In the letter Paxton informs his wife that his hoped-for furlough would not come through in time for him to visit around New Year’s Day, … Continue reading

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