Tag Archives: Georgia

19 July 1862: “Any Cotton Among us Belonging to Traitors!”

Item description: Newspaper article, “Any Cotton Among us Belonging to Traitors!,” as re-published in the 19 July 1862 issue of the Wilmington Daily Journal. The article was originally published in the Atlanta Confederacy newspaper. Item citation: “Any Cotton Among us … Continue reading

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20 November 1861: Raising the Black Flag, “Such an event must fill every thoughtful mind with the gloomiest forebodings.”

Item description: newspaper article, “The Black Flag,” Weekly Standard (Raleigh), 20 November 1861, page 1, column 4. Item transcription: The Black Flag. In modern times, the black flag has never been raised, except as the ensign of the pirate—the heartless … Continue reading

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15 November 1861: ” “Come behold the works of the Lord, what desolations He hath made in the earth. He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; He breaketh to bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; He burneth the chariot in the fire…”

Item description: God in the War. A Sermon Delivered before the Legislature of Georgia, in the Capitol at Milledgeville, on Friday, November 15, 1861, Being a Day Set apart for Fasting, Humiliation and Prayer, by his Excellency the President of … Continue reading

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24 August 1861: “…authorized to appoint an assayer at Charlotte, North Carolinia, and another at Dahlonega, in the State of Georgia, whose duty it shall be to assay and certify the fineness and value of such gold and silver…”

Item description: Act of the Confederate States of America (approved on 24 August 1861, and later published in The Statutes at Large of the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America) concerning the appointment of two assayers (one in … Continue reading

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