Category Archives: University of North Carolina

First Black Female FBI Agent was UNC-Chapel Hill Alumna

The first black woman FBI agent in the United States was UNC-Chapel Hill’s Sylvia Elizabeth Mathis (J.D., 1975). Hers was a life framed by a commitment to service, a dedication to family, and marked by numerous accomplishments. In May 1975, … Continue reading

Posted in history, Tar Heelia, UNC, UNC History, University History, University of North Carolina | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on First Black Female FBI Agent was UNC-Chapel Hill Alumna

James K. Polk: 19th Century Student Activist?

Was there such a thing as student activism in the 19th century? If so, what form did this activism take? An article in the Daily Tar Heel, published December 5, 1967, asserts that one of UNC’s most famous alums, United … Continue reading

Posted in Di-Phi, Dialectic Society, DiPhi, From the Archives, UNC, UNC History, Uncategorized, University Archives, University History, University of North Carolina | Comments Off on James K. Polk: 19th Century Student Activist?

Violence, Hardship, and the Southern Response

The South has witnessed unspeakable historical violence, hardship, and unrest. Whether it is a system developed over hundreds of years or the single act of one person, Southerners have used these circumstances as fuel to protest for a better reality … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Activism, African American, Business, Civil Rights, Digital SHC, Education, Family, Featured Collections, Finding aids, In the News, Journalism, Labor, Links, Politics, Race Relations, Religion, Southern Culture, Southern Oral History Program, University of North Carolina, Women | Comments Off on Violence, Hardship, and the Southern Response

Violence, Hardship, and the Southern Response

The South has witnessed unspeakable historical violence, hardship, and unrest. Whether it is a system developed over hundreds of years or the single act of one person, Southerners have used these circumstances as fuel to protest for a better reality … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Activism, African American, Business, Civil Rights, Digital SHC, Education, Family, Featured Collections, Finding aids, In the News, Journalism, Labor, Links, Politics, Race Relations, Religion, Southern Culture, Southern Oral History Program, University of North Carolina, Women | Comments Off on Violence, Hardship, and the Southern Response

New Collections: Activists, Educators, Families, and War

We have over a dozen new collections that are preserved, processed, and now available for research. Some highlights: New materials span from 1764 to 2010 Subjects geographically range from Mexico to China (with plenty of Alabama and North Carolina in … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Activism, African American, Civil Rights, civil war, Collections, Education, Family, Journalism, Labor, New Collections, Personal archives, Politics, Race Relations, slavery, Southern Culture, University of North Carolina, War, Women | Comments Off on New Collections: Activists, Educators, Families, and War

New Collections: Activists, Educators, Families, and War

We have over a dozen new collections that are preserved, processed, and now available for research. Some highlights: New materials span from 1764 to 2010 Subjects geographically range from Mexico to China (with plenty of Alabama and North Carolina in … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Activism, African American, Civil Rights, civil war, Collections, Education, Family, Journalism, Labor, New Collections, Personal archives, Politics, Race Relations, slavery, Southern Culture, University of North Carolina, War, Women | Comments Off on New Collections: Activists, Educators, Families, and War

A Look at UNC’s Bout with Censorship: The 1963 Speaker Ban

Guest Poster: SHC Student Worker, James A. Moore (UNC Class of 2015) From the eccentric monologues of the pit preacher, to the passionate Ferguson protest, to the somber vigil for Deah Barakat, Yusor Abu-Salha and Razan Abu-Salha, recent times have demonstrated … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Chancellor Otis A. Singletary, Chapel Hill, Civil Rights, protestors, speaker ban, University of North Carolina | Comments Off on A Look at UNC’s Bout with Censorship: The 1963 Speaker Ban

A Look at UNC’s Bout with Censorship: The 1963 Speaker Ban

Guest Poster: SHC Student Worker, James A. Moore (UNC Class of 2015) From the eccentric monologues of the pit preacher, to the passionate Ferguson protest, to the somber vigil for Deah Barakat, Yusor Abu-Salha and Razan Abu-Salha, recent times have demonstrated … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Chancellor Otis A. Singletary, Chapel Hill, Civil Rights, protestors, speaker ban, University of North Carolina | Comments Off on A Look at UNC’s Bout with Censorship: The 1963 Speaker Ban

21 November 1864: “I would willingly enter the army this winter with the consent of my parents, still if Father can raise the funds I presume I will be allowed to graduate.”

Item Description: Letter from John Steele Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson. He writes that he needs more money for his tuition or he will be forced to leave the University of North Carolina.  He is due to come … Continue reading &#… Continue reading

Posted in chapel hill nc, John Steele Henderson, Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina | Comments Off on 21 November 1864: “I would willingly enter the army this winter with the consent of my parents, still if Father can raise the funds I presume I will be allowed to graduate.”

21 November 1864: “I would willingly enter the army this winter with the consent of my parents, still if Father can raise the funds I presume I will be allowed to graduate.”

Item Description: Letter from John Steele Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson. He writes that he needs more money for his tuition or he will be forced to leave the University of North Carolina.  He is due to come … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in chapel hill nc, John Steele Henderson, Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina | Comments Off on 21 November 1864: “I would willingly enter the army this winter with the consent of my parents, still if Father can raise the funds I presume I will be allowed to graduate.”