Autumnal Equinox

For our readers in the Northern Hemisphere, 2:04 a.m. marks the arrival of the autumnal equinox.  As we revisit the new season, today’s post calls attention to some of Hugh Morton’s fall imagery—and provides an opportunity to try the “gallery “post format” to A View to Hugh’s new theme.  Take a moment to explore other Hugh Morton autumn photographs.  What are your favorite Morton fall scenes? How do you like the gallery post format?  Please let us know!

2 thoughts on “Autumnal Equinox

  1. Shortly after completing this post, I saw a photograph on the cover of October 9th, 1954 issue of THE STATE magazine that is very similar to one of the autumn black-and-white photographs in the online collection (see http://dc.lib.unc.edu/u?/morton_highlights,6606). Hugh Morton’s identification for the negative is “Altamont, fall scene.” I almost used that photograph in this post, but it was a horizontal so I skipped it.

    Seeing the photograph on the cover of THE STATE raised my curiosity, so using Google Earth, I was able (I think!) to pinpoint the spot where Morton made the photograph: plug in the coordinates 35.97302, -81.95522 and see what you think.

    If you haven’t used Google Earth (you’ll need to download it from Google’s website. Once you enter the coordinates in the “Fly to” box and click on the magnifying glass:

    1) zoom down using the + button, until just a little after the zoom effect begins to orient you with the horizon near the top of the screen;

    2) “look” to the SSE by grabbing the N on the top dial top in the upper right with the symbol of an eye and then spin it around to the “seven o’clock” position;

    3) then move forward by clicking and holding the top arrow in the lower dial.

    Your results may vary a bit, so you may have to fine tune your adjustments using the directional controls. If you get it right, you can see how the landscape has changed since 1954! If you fly forward by scrolling the screen using the hand icon you can travel to Hawksbill and Table Rock in the distance, and then fly through the Linville Gorge.

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