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Archive for November, 2007

Payday at the Mill

The other day, in the North Carolina Collection stacks, I found a small packet labeled “Harriet-Henderson Mill Pay Envelopes, 1926-1927.” Inside were a bunch of small, manila envelopes that had at one time contained the weekly pay of textile mill employees. On the outside of each envelope was the employee’s name, the date, and a […]

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The G. A. Kohler

A 1933 hurricane pushed the G. A. Kohler, a four-masted schooner from Baltimore, ashore just north of Cape Hatteras. The wreck remained on the coast until World War II, when the wooden ship was burned in an effort to recover scrap iron from her hull. The image of the intact ship was made sometime between […]

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BSM at 40

Today’s News & Observer has a nice feature on the fortieth anniversary of the Black Student Movement at UNC. This photo, from the UNC student yearbook, depicts a member of the Black Student Movement in 1969. The image was used in “I Raised My Hand to Volunteer: Students Protest in 1960s Chapel Hill,” an exhibit […]

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I’m pretty sure that “Jack and the Beanstalk” is an English fairy tale, but the location of the story may have to be changed to western North Carolina. On September 1st of this year, Boone-based Appalachian State University shocked the college football world by upsetting perennial powerhouse Michigan…in “The Big House,” no less. Not to […]

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The extensive archive of noted North Carolina photographer Hugh Morton (shown below in the early 1940s) is one of the most exciting acquisitions to come to the North Carolina Collection in recent years. The staff of the NCC Photographic Archives are currently hard at work in sorting through and cataloging a lifetime’s worth of work. […]

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This Month in North Carolina History On November 13, 1997, the first major casino in North Carolina opened on the reservation of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in the western part of the state. The opening was the culmination of nearly a decade’s worth of negotiation and compromise between tribal, state, and federal officials. […]

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