Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for November, 2009

“Movie stars such as Mary Pickford and Charlie Chaplin visited the Queen City to generate enthusiasm [for war bonds]. Charlie Chaplin’s stimulating 10-minute speech on April 11, 1918, succeeded in raising $20,000 to $25,000 in subscriptions. He promised to kiss any woman in the audience who subscribed $5,000 worth of bonds…. Several $1,000 pledges were made…. […]

Read Full Post »

On this day in 1963 17-year-old Jim Hunter of Hertford in Perquimans County, hunting with his brothers on Thanksgiving Day, comes harrowingly close to ending his Hall of Fame pitching career before it starts. An accidental blast from a shotgun blows away his right little toe and embeds 45 pellets in his foot. By June he […]

Read Full Post »

“It was the summer of ’79, and four Lincolnton boys were going through Dean Smith’s basketball camp at Chapel Hill. “Between lay-up drills, John Cloninger, Lee Brogden, Chris Brogden, and Trey Carter whiled away the time thinking up rude things to say about the Tar Heels’ ACC rivals. “‘Duke is puke,’ said one. “‘Wake is fake,’ […]

Read Full Post »

This excerpt of Ogilby’s 1671 map, “A new discription of Carolina by the order of the Lords Proprietors,” shows an area named Turkey Quarters, located in what is now Pender County, but at the time, Clarendon County.  According to Powell’s North Carolina Gazeteer, the area was named “by Barbadian explorers in 1663 becuase of the […]

Read Full Post »

“Happy Anniversary, Dad.” –Officials of the Empire State Building, sending a 50th anniversary card (in 1979) to Winston-Salem’s Reynolds Building, on which it was modeled. The 22-story art deco landmark, vacated earlier this year, has just been put on the market by Reynolds American. It’s my favorite building in North Carolina — what’s yours?

Read Full Post »

“In 1976, after its workers in North Carolina voted for the ACTWU to represent them, [J.P. Stevens] once again refused to bargain…. “A five-year international consumer boycott proved ineffective — in part because ‘Peanuts’ characters, stitched into the textile giant’s sheets and towels, masked the corporate identity. “The ‘Peanuts’ line, [touted as] the ‘single biggest-selling sheet pattern ever […]

Read Full Post »

“I have a framed, yellowing copy of my first published oeuvre, a poem called ‘Fresh Fruits of Autumn Leaves,’ which at five years old I had composed for my mother while we were having a bath…. My mother jumped out of the tub, grabbed a pen and paper and asked me to repeat what I’d said…. […]

Read Full Post »

Map gets it right

Nick Graham, the ever-alert manager of the digitization project, North Carolina Maps, knows that I love maps and, at one time, studied the history of highways in North Carolina. He recently alerted me to a great 1924 highway map of North Carolina digitized from the collection of the State Archives in Raleigh. The back of […]

Read Full Post »

Series 2 of the Hugh Morton finding aid is now available online! Visit the finding aid here to check out the addition of People and Events, late 1920s-early 2000s (bulk 1940s-1990s). To see photos from Series 2 online through the Hugh Morton Collection of Photographs and Films, click here. More information on the addition is […]

Read Full Post »

“Robert Williams was one of the most realistic comedians the screen had. He made Cary Grant look like he was overacting…. To watch Robert Williams act was like seeing a comic using the Method, long before the Method became famous with Marlon [Brando] and Monty [Clift].” –From a Turner Classic Movies interview with actor Christopher […]

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »