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Archive for February, 2010

On this day in 1865: Prisoner of war A.O. Abbott, first lieutenant in the 1st N.Y. Dragoons, records the POW train’s stop in Goldsboro, en route to Wilmington: “There was also a camp of enlisted men about a mile from us, and they were suffering all it was possible for them to suffer and live. […]

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“To combat agricultural depression and the hand-to-mouth cash crop system, North Carolina has  been conducting what its able Governor Oliver Max Gardner calls a ‘Live-at-Home’ campaign. The economic theory is that the home-living husbandman raises his own food and feed, patronizes local production plants, reduces his dependence upon extrastate sources of supply. [Included in the […]

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“It was disgusting, but you learned to expect to lose a certain amount of pottery. I don’t know why people thought there’s nothing could be done about it. If you grow up thinking that is the way it is, then you accept it. It’s a funny thing that people have made pottery around here for […]

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During the month of February, we’ve added several new towns to the NC Postcards website.  Fresh towns include: Bakersville, Mitchell County Hayesville, Clay County Swansboro, Onslow County Wagram, Scotland County Warsaw, Duplin County

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“Nature destined woman to be the home maker, the child rearer, while man is the money maker. “I am unwilling, as a Southern man, to force upon her any burden which will distract this loving potentate from her sacred, God-imposed duties. I am unwilling to force her into the vortex of politics, where her sensitiveness […]

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Long before NASCAR, North Carolina established its reputation for being a state that took racing seriously.  In the 18th and 19th Centuries, horse racing in North Carolina was a serious endeavor.   Great race horses like Sir Archie (whose descendant was Secretariat) made the state the locus of racing in the South.  While horse racing in […]

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“In 1942 the North Carolina crowd at Reynolds Tobacco invaded American Tobacco’s headquarters town and put up a huge sign for Camel in Times Square. Overnight it became the nation’s most famous billboard. “Two stories high and running half a block… the sign had just three elements: the brand name, its old slogan ‘I’d Walk […]

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North Carolina’s agricultural roots run deep, and we have unveiled a new pathfinder called “Agriculture in North Carolina” in our research guides to outline the maps, magazines, pamphlets, postcards, and histories related to the state’s rich agricultural history.  The pathfinder covers industries that are known successes, such as hog farming, but also industries such as […]

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Dismal Swamp Canal

The Dismal Swamp Canal opened in 1805, and was the first man-made waterway in America.  The canal, which runs between Deep Creek, VA, and South Mills, NC, has a rather long and storied history:  Discussions between North Carolina and Virginia regarding the construction of the canal began as early 1730.  Several founding fathers weighed in […]

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“In Durham, North Carolina, the Morning Herald ran an ad for the [local premiere of the 1946 movie ‘Ziegfeld Follies’]. It listed [Lena] Horne among the players. Scores of black patrons bought tickets for the first showing — and saw a jagged splice where [her rendition of] ‘Love’ should have been.  Many of them complained […]

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