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Archive for February, 2010

We just added 8619 new entries into the North Carolina Collection’s Biographical Index. What is the Biographical Index? Well, I’m glad you asked. It contains citations to biographical sketches about North Carolinians. Over five hundred volumes, primarily from the North Carolina Collection and other libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, have […]

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Death noted: Kathryn Grayson, who brought operatic talent to the golden age of  Hollywood musicals, at age 88 in Los Angeles. From the Winston-Salem Journal (Feb. 19): “Grayson was born Zelma Kathryn Hedrick on Feb. 9, 1922, in Winston-Salem. Her family lived on Apple Street. They moved to St. Louis when she was a child, […]

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“Community leaders in Knoxville and Asheville got on the bandwagon — some out of a love of the mountains, some on the belief that tourism would bolster the local economy, some on the hope that a national park would result in better roads for the region. “A New York publicity firm, brought in by the Knoxville […]

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With all of the H1N1 warnings (and the fact that I think I’m coming down with something as I type this), here’s an item published by North Carolina’s State Board of Health in the early 20th Century. A hot foot bath and staying in bed for 24 hours straight sounds like a plan to me.

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“Since nothing travels in the direction of hungry men like news of  work, they started to roll in on foot and in old Model Ts as soon as the contract… to build the world’s biggest smokeless powder plant in Charlestown, Indiana… was announced in the newspaper…. “A man from a small town in North Carolina […]

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Float Bridge, Hertford, NC

The real photo postcard from ca. 1906 shows a wooden float (or pontoon) bridge in Hertford, NC.  This bridge was built in 1784, and was attached at one end but only tethered at the other.  If a boat needed to pass through, they would untie the bridge, let it float down river so the boat […]

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We’ve recently extracted from an in-house database more than 4,500 records representing approximately 19,000 negatives made by Roland Giduz in and around Chapel Hill between 1947 and 1970, and have made that information available through a new finding aid.  Prior to this improved finding aid, researchers only had this degree of subject access by working […]

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Did you know that W.E.B. Du Bois was so impressed with booming African American business and commerce in early twentieth century Durham, he wrote an essay about it? “Du Bois’s essay ‘The Upbuilding of Black Durham'[…]sounds a hopeful note, praising a North Carolina town in which a flourishing black middle class had developed robust manufacturing […]

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Here’s a Tar Heel knockoff of a “Va.” quiz offered by puzzlemaster Will Shortz on NPR. Limit your responses to only “N.C.” words (Northampton County, for example, or Nextel Cup.) Spoiler alert: Answers immediately below. 1. As a gubernatorial candidate, Bev Perdue lamented that “Wherever I go, people ask me, ‘Can’t we stop the — […]

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“As concerns about the health implications of smoking persisted — and then increased — in the 1930s and 1940s, advertising explicitly addressed these anxieties…. R. J. Reynolds fixed on the likely notion that smokers would be attracted to the brand that their physician chose, and that physicians would advocate for a brand that lionized the […]

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