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Archive for November, 2010

The Black Student Movement was established by African American students in November of 1967 as a result of their dissatisfaction with the campus NAACP chapter as well as the slow growth of the African American student population at UNC. UNC’s Virtual Museum, a growing online exhibit that focuses on UNC history, has just published an […]

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“There came to our place a large army, who killed many men, and took me, and brought me to the great sea, and sold me into the hands of the Christians, who bound me and sent me on board a great ship and we sailed upon the great sea a month and a half, when […]

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Eugene “Genial Gene” Potts, one of the “Original 13″ black radio announcers in the South, began his 30-year career at Charlotte’s WGIV (“We’re G.I. Veterans”) in 1948. His trademark was a rhyming, rap-like patter invented to overcome a stammer — as in “We’re setting the pace for others to trace.” A man sought for killing […]

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– Amy Sedaris says no thanks to North Carolina  turkey feathers. – Before the Stevens Center was the Stevens Center…. – Discovery Channel sees a Whiteville man about a log. – Baba Ram Dass: My son, the Greensboro capitalist.

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On this day in 1913: As part of his proclaimed Good Roads Days, Gov. Locke Craig, clad in overalls, takes up a shovel on a Buncombe County work crew. Craig’s call for two days of volunteer maintenance on the state’s dirt roads elicits mixed response. In Guilford County more than 1,000 men show up; students […]

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We’ve got a busy week coming up at the North Carolina Collection and we’re hoping you’ll join us for some of our activities. On Monday (Nov.8), we’ll celebrate the publication of The Good Government Man: Albert Coates and the Early Years of the Institute of Government. Prize-winning North Carolina author Howard Covington has written a […]

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– What was his great-great-great grandfather thinking? – A play about Harriet Jacobs, a film about Carl Sandburg. – Death noted: Clyde King, whose long baseball career began with an overnight transformation from Tar Heel to Brooklyn Dodger. – Roadside marker in Fayetteville is state’s first to  recognize a Muslim. – Lost Colony researcher‘s  “two […]

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“Last year Americans ate nearly a billion pounds of commercially frozen foods. About a half-billion more pounds were stored in 5,000 cold-locker plants by some 1,500,000 U.S. families. The quick-freezing boom is growing fast. Last week magazine Writer Boyden Sparkes published a book predicting the next big move will be toward freezing and storage in […]

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In this morning’s Raleigh News and Observer, political columnist Rob Christensen, who was commenting on yesterday’s elections, pointed out that the last time the North Carolina General Assembly was led by Republicans was “in 1898 when lawmakers arrived in horse and buggy or by train.” Why did Christensen bring up the 1890s? What happened then? […]

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On this day in 1919: In Elizabeth City, Margaret Sanger delivers the South’s first public lecture on birth control. Sanger, a New Yorker invited by maverick newspaper editor W.O. Saunders, will recall later that she was skeptical of her reception “in a city in which not even a suffragist had delivered a public lecture. To […]

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