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Archive for January, 2011

– Just how big was the Gulf oil spill? This big. — “Ancient Site Re-Discovered” at Robbinsville… or so it says. — Mr. W.T. Marlin sees the error of his ways. — Moore County: Goodbye, coal, hello, natural gas? — Ngram Reader considers the vagaries of  Polish Americana.

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“North Carolina whites [circa 1900] often used the image of African-Americans wearing eyeglasses to play on the white supremacist envy of their audiences. Since many poor whites could not afford glasses and could not read or write so had no need for them, the image elicited a wide range of resentments.” – From “Gender and […]

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“In 18th-century America, a time when large families living in small spaces made home life cramped, taverns served as communal living rooms…. “Records show that in 1755, of the seven or eight houses in the town of Salisbury, North Carolina, four were taverns or inns. One Rowan County clergyman summed up the situation succinctly when […]

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– Death noted: Country singer Charlie Louvin, 83, last of the two Louvin Brothers and first cousin of esteemed Durham native John D. Loudermilk. Charlie and Ira were in fact born Loudermilks, but found the handle too long for career purposes. — Among the “All-time most popular” reader queries to the Star-News’  MyReporter.com is “Will […]

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When President Obama singled out Kathy Proctor, the furniture worker turned Forsyth Tech biotechnology student, it marked the fifth time North Carolina has been mentioned [search here] in a State of the Union address. In the very first such address, in 1790, George Washington waited only one sentence before listing “the recent accession of the […]

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“The language of Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence clearly depended on the Mecklenburg Declaration, which was the work of 27 oatmeal-eating Calvinists, a third of whom were ruling elders in the Presbyterian church. “One Hessian officer, writing home during the war, said, ‘…. Call it not an American rebellion; it is nothing more or less than […]

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– Mmm, mmm, wood! — In Thomasville a Pulitzer-winning photographer shares a basement full of history. — And isn’t that speech therapist’s wife a dead-ringer for John Ehle’s daughter!

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On this day in 1816: Responding to a letter from Sen. Nathaniel Macon of North Carolina, Thomas Jefferson offers his opinion “On the subject of the statue of George Washington, which the legislature of North Carolina has ordered to be procured, and set up in their Capitol.” Jefferson, retired at Monticello at age 73, proposes […]

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A few remembrances of Reynolds Price have noted his deep, resonant voice. Those tributes struck a chord with me because my introduction to Reynolds Price came not through his published works, but, rather, through his voice. His essays on National Public Radio always caught my attention. In my bookish family, his name was a familiar […]

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In 1998 Reynolds Price read from “Roxanna Slade,” his new novel, at a Borders in Charlotte. Afterward, he recalled having visited the White House at the invitation of Bill Clinton. How big a fan was Clinton? Accompanying Price on the elevator, he shocked his guest by reciting the famous opening sentence of “A Long and […]

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