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Archive for June, 2011

Among the disappointed underbidders at the recent Debbie Reynolds memorabilia¬† auction was the Ava Gardner Museum in Smithfield. According to Donna Bailey-Taylor, acting director, the nurse’s uniform Gardner wore in “The Sun Also Rises” fetched $2,500 (plus premium), $1,000 past the museum’s limit. The museum had already returned to the Reynolds collection several items on […]

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“Trinity, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, was a small Methodist college with strict rules governing student conduct, required daily chapel attendance and college-sponsored annual revivals. As the school expanded [and was renamed for benefactor James B. Duke], students began¬† to engage in more and more extracurricular and social affairs, student self-government took […]

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I wonder if these young women spent much time hanging out of windows? The Rapunzel Club, from Weaver College in 1926, is the latest Yearbook Photo of the Week on the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center’s Facebook page. Become a fan of the NC Digital Heritage Center to keep up with news, featured collections, and […]

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It’s been a while since I last dumped a batch of North Caroliniana into the Google Books Ngram Viewer, that instantaneous measure of phrase frequency over the decades. Caveat e-lector: This is data at its rawest — conclusions should be jumped to for entertainment purposes only. Here goes: — Duke lacrosse vs. Duke football and […]

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Today marks the 154th anniversary of the date on which Elisha Mitchell is believed to have died. Mitchell, a professor at UNC, fell about 40 feet to his death after apparently slipping on a precipice by a waterfall that now bears his name. The UNC professor was in Yancey County to measure the altitude of […]

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“[James B.] Duke’s only failure came when he attempted to integrate the cigar industry into his increasingly extensive fold. Cigars, he found, fit poorly with his system of mechanization, standardization and national marketing…. Production of cigars would remain labor intensive, skilled work; they continued to be distributed in small quantities to specialized dealers…. “The cigar […]

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– Greensboro to Wilmington by boat? — Reared in Granville County, he was Tennessee’s wealthiest free black – and a slaveholder. — The before and after life of a 1956 National Science Fair winner. — Tobacco heritage may be embarrassment to baseball¬† in Tampa, but not in Wilson. — On eve of labor landmark’s demolition, […]

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We last updated you on this project, which is a collaboration between the North Carolina State Archives and the State Library of North Carolina, in August 2010 (see blog entry). A long-time reader and blog-post-suggester extraordinaire, pointed out the most recent addition of 400+ more Bible records, and you can read about that addition here: […]

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On this day in 1885: Woodrow Wilson and the former Ellen Louise Axson, married the previous day in Savannah, Ga., arrive at their honeymoon cottage in Arden. They will spend about two months in the four-room clapboard house while he prepares to begin his teaching career as professor of history at Bryn Mawr College. She […]

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Have you ever wondered how much first prize money you would have won at the State Fair in 1915 for your favorite Percheron gelding or mare? How about the best tray of “Nancy Hall” sweet potatoes in 1929? Well, fear not, now you can find out with a few keystrokes and mouse clicks at: North […]

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