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Archive for November, 2011

On this day in 1965: The Rolling Stones make their first appearance in Charlotte, drawing less than a half-full house at the original Coliseum (and failing to rate a review in the Observer). Reports the Charlotte News: “What it was wasn’t music, but it was harmless. Promoter Jim Crockett had hired 40 policemen to hold […]

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“[Dean Moriarty — that is, Neal Cassady] and I suddenly saw the whole country like an oyster for us to open; and the pearl was there, the pearl was there. Off we roared south. We picked up another hitchhiker. This was a sad young kid who said he had an aunt who owned a grocery […]

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On this day inĀ  1928: At the request of American Legion officials, Durham police remove a Ku Klux Klan float from line in the annual Armistice Day parade. The float bears the letters “KKK” and two white-draped figures representing “Purity” and “Honesty.” “Since our post is composed of men of all classes and all religious […]

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Happy Veterans Day!

We thought this Fort Bragg color guard a fitting tribute to Tar Heel veterans as well as all those men and women currently in uniform who call the Old North State home. The card also seemed an appropriate salute to our having surpassed 10,000 cards on North Carolina Postcards. And, by the way, we’re still […]

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Over 200 city directories from 34 different cities and towns are now available to search and browse on DigitalNC: http://digitalnc.org/collections/north-carolina-city-directories. Most of the directories in the digital collection are from the North Carolina Collection, with a few contributed by the Durham County Library and the Forsyth County Public Library. We are planning to add more […]

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“In 1937, Postmaster General James Farley dedicated a new post office in Arlington, Virginia, and managed to place Sir Walter Raleigh in the wrong place at the wrong time and also to locate Roanoke Island in Virginia rather than North Carolina. These lapses received front-page coverage…. “While gently chiding Farley, a New York Times editorial […]

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On this day in 1983: Wilson Goode, one of eight children of Northampton County sharecroppers, is elected the first black mayor of Philadelphia. His family moved from North Carolina to Philadelphia when he was 15. The low point of Goode’s eight years in office will come in 1985, when police trying to evict the radical […]

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“In 1737, an observer in North Carolina suggested that planters were quite mindful of enslaved women’s reproductive value, writing that ‘a numberousĀ  Issue [is] esteemed the greatest Riches in this country.’ He went on to suggest that slaveowners interfered in the lives of enslaved couples by obliging women to take a ‘second, third, fourth, fifth […]

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Tonight on UNC-TV, North Carolina Collection Curator Bob Anthony will be featured on the long-running “North Carolina People” program. Bob will sit down with host William Friday to discuss the North Carolina Collection and North Carolina history. The program airs tonight (November 4) at 9:00 p.m. and will run again on Sunday, November 6, at […]

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“Back in his home state of North Carolina to speak on foreign policy, TV Newsman Edward R. Murrow was button holed in Charlotte by a reporter: When and why had Murrow changed his name from Egbert to Edward? “Caught squarely, ex-Logger Murrow grinned and replied: ‘I did that when I was 13 or 14 years […]

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