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Archive for May, 2012

Several new titles just added to “New in the North Carolina Collection.” To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the “New in the North Carolina Collection” tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in […]

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From AsheVittles: Favorite Recipes from Asheville, North Carolina. From Hyde County Cook Book. From The Charlotte Cookbook.. From The Junior Service League’s Chapel Hill Cook Book: Tried and Tested Recipes. From Carolina Cooking.

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Arthel Lane “Doc” Watson died Tuesday evening in Winston-Salem. He was 89. A native of Deep Gap, N.C., he was considered by many as one of the world’s best flatpick guitar players. He was known for his devotion to family and to the land of his birth, Watauga County in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains. […]

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Death noted: Banjo picker Doug Dillard, at age 75 in Nashville. Although Dillard wasn’t a North Carolinian — he was born in Salem, Mo. — the one he played on TV played a key part in the bluegrass music revival of the 1960s. Dillard was a founder of the band bearing his surname — except […]

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On May 29, 1888 William Henry Belk opened a dry good store in his hometown of Monroe. Although the store was originally known as New York Racket, the name was changed to Belk Brothers in 1891 when John Belk, an Anson County doctor, joined the company. The business grew as the Belk brothers partnered with […]

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On this day in 1957: The News & Observer of Raleigh runs seven front-page photos of liquor lobbyists furtively unloading crates of their goods at the Hotel Sir Walter, home away from home for most lawmakers, and of bellhops distributing bottles of bourbon and Scotch. The expose ends the longtime practice of legislators receiving free […]

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“Some of the clearest messages… concerning their perceived status as ornamental husband-hunters…. came from the admissions offices of leading Southern institutions like the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which established a ‘Coed Quota’ of 1,000 in 1946 in order to accommodate more male veterans and announced that ‘additional student body increases in the […]

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Memorial Hall was the University of North Carolina’s first monument to graduates killed in war. Occupied in 1885, the building honored the University’s Civil War dead as well as David Lowry Swain, who served as the University’s president from 1835-1868, and others who served the University. Memorial Hall was the first building erected on campus […]

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Willis Haviland Carrier may get credit as the first to devise a system for simultaneously cooling, dehumidifying, circulating and cleansing the air. But it’s a Tar Heel, Stuart W. Cramer, who coined the term to describe the system. Cramer delivered a talk on “Recent Development in Air Conditioning” at the annual conference of the American […]

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“Expressions  common to all parts of the state [but] not current  in Virginia or South Carolina — real Tarheelisms — are exceedingly scarce. These two words may perhaps be so regarded: tow sack and biddie! “Tow sack for a burlap sack is in general use throughout the state and very little outside its boundaries…. “The […]

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