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Archive for August, 2012

There will be lots of recalling Baby and Johnny this weekend as the town of Lake Lure holds its 3rd annual “Dirty Dancing Festival.” Parts of the 1987 film Dirty Dancing, featuring Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey as star-crossed lovers Johnny and Baby, were filmed in and around Lake Lure. Scenes of Johnny, Baby and […]

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From Kitchen Kapers. From Buffet Benny’s Family Cookbook: Recipes, Stories & Ppoems from the Appalachian Mountains. From Auntie’s Cook Book: Favorite Recipes. From Carolina Cooking. From Columbus County Cookbook II.  

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“Be just and fear not.” With these words, David Ward Simmons, UNC class of 1861, signed a classmate’s autograph book. Three years later, Simmons died at the age of 23 of wounds sustained on the battlefield near Petersburg, Virginia. Our August Artifacts of the Month, donated by a relative of Simmons, include an ambrotype of […]

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Death noted: Karl Fleming, 84, one of the greats of civil rights reporting. Fleming was born in Newport News, Va., but grew up in the Methodist Orphanage in Raleigh, attended Appalachian State and worked on dailies in Wilson, Durham and Asheville before landing his career-defining job at Newsweek. This is from his “Son of the […]

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“The city park movement, instigated by Andrew Jackson Downing, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux in the 1840s and 1850s, demonstrated that Americans needed to balance city life with healthful interactions with nature…. “In the context of the landscape of war, which transformed forests into camp villages seemingly overnight and often seemed to wipe out […]

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 On this day in 1863: Private D.L. Day, Co. B, 25th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, writes in his journal while on duty at Hill’s Point: “We were marched out and paraded, and [the inspecting officer] commenced his job. He found right smart of fault, but didn’t find a really good subject until he came to me. […]

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There are a lot of things wrong with this article, which I found in the August 15, 1902 edition of the Elm City Elevator, from the small town of Elm City, located in Wilson County. To begin with, the tree revered by UNC-Chapel Hill students and alumni alike is referred to as the “David Poplar” […]

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“… During North Carolina’s early history, it was the Eastern counties that held not just most of the political power but also most of the wealth. It was the Piedmont and Western counties of the Carolina backcountry that were relatively poor. “The two sides of the dispute had colorful nicknames, although the terms were not […]

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Unlike my previous samplings here and here and here, some of the slights suffered by Charlotte seem to have been unintentional — or maybe not even insults at all. What do you think?…. “It makes you wonder who won the War Between the States.” – Kurt Vonnegut, visiting novelist, marveling at Charlotte’s glitzy uptown. (1994) […]

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On this day in 1944: As Allied troops advance toward Paris, Pfc. James McRacken of Red Springs single-handedly disarms the explosives with which retreating Germans expected to blow up the last remaining bridge in Mayenne, a city of 18,600. Had the bridge been demolished, the Allies would have had to use heavy aerial bombardment on […]

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