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Archive for August, 2013

Seen this one before? Probably not. I suspect this photo never made its way to print. The image of FDR on Roanoke Island is among prints and negatives in the Albertype Company Collection of the North Carolina Collection Photographic Archive (NCCPA). We recently added a host of scans from the collection to our Digital NCCPA. […]

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Who wants bacon?

Every year on the Saturday before Labor Day, bacon lovers across America celebrate International Bacon Day.  There are bacon festivals from Virginia to San Diego with music, cook-offs, and most importantly BACON.  Create a new bacon concoction and have your own bacon cook-off or get inspired by one of these recipes from NC cookbooks. Peanut […]

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August is National Sandwich Month and we are ending the month with some sandwich recipes that will leave you asking “Is it lunch time yet?” From Favorite recipes. Sicily Sandwich from Mountain elegance : a collection of favorite recipes. Curried Lamb Pockets from Love yourself cookbook : easy recipes for one or two. Garden Sandwich from Vegetarian delights : a hearty collection of […]

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With the much-hyped Jadeveon Clowney expected to doom UNC’s chances of beginning its football season with a win, we thought it important to remind readers that the overall record in the intrastate match-up puts UNC ahead with twice the number of wins as the other Carolina to the South. The series record is 34-17 with […]

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On this day in 1974: In a landmark union election, J.P. Stevens employees in seven Roanoke Rapids mills vote to be represented by the Textile Workers Union of America: 1,685 for the union, 1,448 against. North Carolina’s AFL-CIO President Wilbur Hobby proclaims “a new day in Dixie. J.P. first, the textile industry second and then […]

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“Inside or outside his [Durham] photo studio, Hugh Mangum created an atmosphere — respectful and often playful — in which hundreds of men, women and children opened themselves. Though the late-19th-century American South in which he worked was marked by disenfranchisement, segregation and inequality — between black and white, men and women, rich and poor […]

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“At some points, marchers moved silently…. At other points, the march was a parade, with rhythmic singing and chanting…. “A group of 82 people from Wilmington, North Carolina, dressed in black jackets and hoods, strolled down Constitution Avenue, mocking the segregationist senator from South Carolina [sic] with a variation of ‘Oh Freedom': No more Sam […]

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On this day in 1869: Harriet Morrison Irwin, a frail and bookish Charlotte homemaker, becomes the first woman granted a patent for an architectural design — a hexagonal house. One advertisement touts Mrs. Irwin’s hexagon as applying “the principle of bee-building to human architecture,” but it wins few converts. Her model home in Charlotte’s Fourth […]

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” ‘Confusion with Jim Crow Bible’ [a story in the Raleigh Evening Times] March 29, 1906, describes an incident during the trial of a black schoolteacher accused of disposing of a mule on which there was a mortgage. A defense witness, who was colored but looked white, took the stand and was being sworn in […]

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“I’m back in New York after a six months’ stay in the mountains near Asheville, North Carolina. I was all played out — nerves, etc. I didn’t pick up down there as well as I should have done. There was too much scenery and fresh air. What I need is a steam-heated flat with no […]

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