Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2017

On this day in 1861: L. P. Walker, Confederate secretary of war, approves purchase of an abandoned cotton mill at Salisbury for use as a prison for captured Union soldiers. To their later regret, the owners agree to take payment in Confederate bonds. Before being closed four years later Salisbury prison will become notorious for […]

Read Full Post »

This ticket to the Cleveland County Negro Fair, July’s Artifact of the Month, highlights a little known part of North Carolina history, African American agricultural fairs. Agricultural fairs held by and for African Americans took place in North Carolina starting in Wilmington in 1875. The largest and best-known African American fair in the state was […]

Read Full Post »

“The summer of 1967 was one of discontent for Joe Namath….The fascination with his swingin’ lifestyle that had dominated in 1966 had given way to criticism…. “When he arrived in Charlotte for the Jets’ fourth exhibition game, Namath was not in much of mood to speak to anyone…. “That night Namath was a guest of […]

Read Full Post »

Several new titles just added to “New in the North Carolina Collection.” To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the “New in the North Carolina Collection” tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in […]

Read Full Post »

“In mid-1955, the Supreme Court set about identifying its own relocation facility [in the event of nuclear war] and sent clerk Harold Willey to hunt for a spot. Willey surveyed several properties in North Carolina and reported back that ‘Because all large cities are considered to be prospective enemy targets, a hotel in a secluded […]

Read Full Post »

This latest look back at the Love Valley rock festival of 1970 produces yet another string of vivid reminiscences, such as this one from Hillsborough lawyer Kenneth Rothrock: “I remember that big hill everyone was sitting on from bottom to top. It was so steep that people were all on little perches. If you moved […]

Read Full Post »

On this day in 1844: Mary Baker Eddy, future founder of the Christian Science church, leaves Wilmington to return to her family farm in New Hampshire following the death of her husband from yellow fever. She and businessman George Washington Glover, married barely six months, had lived in Wilmington while he planned a construction project […]

Read Full Post »

“Draft boards [during World War I] used their power to punish political opponents and reinforce existing power structures. This was especially true in the South, where white authorities used the draft against African-Americans. For instance, in Hyde County, for every white man sent into the army, the draft board sent three blacks, a figure twice […]

Read Full Post »

[While he was governor of New York, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s] polio seemed almost forgotten — but would the nation at large react the same when he ran for president? “To reassure any doubters, his old friend and navy superior Josephus Daniels penned an article for the Saturday Evening Post in September 1932….  ‘The fact that […]

Read Full Post »

Blueberry Nut Ice Cream from Cooking with berries. Untapped Source of Lifetime Happiness Blueberry Muffins from Aunt Bee’s delightful desserts. Blueberry Buckle from Count our blessings : 75 years of recipes and memories / Myers Park Presbyterian Church. Blueberry Betty from Historic Moores Creek cook book : a collection of old and new recipes. Blueberry Salad from The Pantry shelf : 1907-1982. Blueberry Flummery from My mother’s […]

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Howdy,
Buy Premium Version to add more powerful tools to this place. https://wpclever.net/downloads/wp-admin-smart-search