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Archive for August, 2017

Several new titles just added to “New in the North Carolina Collection.” To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the “New in the North Carolina Collection” tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in […]

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It’s back to school time here at UNC and the campus is abuzz with students. Here are a few pointers from our cookbook collection on how to survive cooking during dorm life. On Campus Cookbook Beware buying in bulk from On campus cookbook. Beware buying in bulk from On campus cookbook. Quick Breakfasts to get […]

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On this day in 1929: Maxwell Perkins finishes editing Thomas Wolfe’s “Look Homeward, Angel.” Number of words trimmed: 90,000. From John Walsh in the Independent of London: “When a novel by the hopeless title ‘O Lost’ was discovered on the Scribner’s unsolicited manuscripts pile, Perkins was told to make something publishable out of it. He […]

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“In the immediate aftermath of the horrific Charlottesville march and neo-Nazi melee, the mainstream media turned mainly to male historians for comment – just as they always have…. “But then a funny thing happened…. A bevy of women historians submitted op-eds….The [Washington] Post alone featured seven on its new history page, Made by History….  [Another]  ran on the […]

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On this day in 1983: Highest temperature ever recorded in North Carolina: 110 degrees, at Fayetteville. Less than two years later the state’s lowest temperature will be reached at Mt. Mitchell.  

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Belated hat tip to former Miscellany keeper Jason Tomberlin and researcher-commenter Kevin Cherry for this fact-packed post about the eclipse of 1900, when Wadesboro became the mecca of the astronomical world…. This time, alas, Anson County’s view will max out at 97.5 percent of the total eclipse. .

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“Wilson, North Carolina… has been home since 1926 to a memorial that commemorated the Revolution and the Confederacy: It originally featured a massive central column depicting the Stars and Stripes and the flag of the Confederate States of America, flanked by two water fountains — one for whites, one for blacks. It apparently outlasted its […]

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“Although there are many decisions to the effect that it is actionable per se to call a white person a Negro, not one can be found deciding whether it would be so to call a Negro a white person. [But] one event looks, in a measure, in this direction. “The city of Asheville, North Carolina, […]

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“According to the historian David S. Cecelski, presenting [Alfred] Waddell as a righteous campaigner for ‘sobriety and peace’ was standard in Wilmington until the 1990s. ‘I grew up in a small town in eastern North Carolina 90 miles from Wilmington,’ Cecelski says. ‘I had a book in my middle-school classroom that listed the 12 greatest […]

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“Whatever the motive behind secession, once the war began the overwhelming number of Confederate soldiers, most of whom were non­ slaveholders, fought to defend their states, homes, and families from the invading federal armies. Such was the case with my four great uncles, poor dirt farmers who owned no slaves. Two served as privates in […]

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