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Archive for the ‘Just A Bite’ Category

The New York Times: What’s the one book you wish someone else would write? Rick Perlstein, author of “The Invisible Bridge”: I used to think some history graduate student looking for a dissertation topic should do a biography of Robert Welch, the founder of the John Birch Society. Back then I thought of it as […]

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“A radically tolerant American palate drove the development of American foodways, necessarily requiring settlers — freemen, slaves, and servants; men, women, and children — to remain temperamentally open to any number of unexpected culinary influences that might, one way or another, quietly shape the national diet while citizens were otherwise preoccupied with more remunerative endeavors. […]

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“The Dismal Swamp Canal, on the border between Virginia and North Carolina… was basically a dredged passage through the marshes, and it enjoyed brief fame because of a hotel built on its banks directly on top of the state line. “Young eighteenth century swells would hold duels here, one man standing in Virginia, the other […]

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“Pigs produce 10 times the fecal matter as humans. That means that all the pigs in North Carolina produce the same amount of feces every day as the people in North Carolina, California, New York, Texas, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire and North Dakota.” – Rick Dove, Neuse Riverkeeper emeritus, as quoted in “Aporkalypse Now: Pig-Killing Virus Could […]

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“[The parents of John Green, author of the young-adult tearjerker  "The Fault in Our Stars"] retired to [Fairview] North Carolina, where, as he puts it, they grow vegetables and make soap, literally: ” ‘My mum has a business making soap from goat’s milk. Farmer Jane Soaps…. It’s infuriatingly inefficiently run. It could be a very […]

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“As recently as 1980, 76 percent of [North Carolina] residents were natives, and the next-largest source of state residents was South Carolina. Today, there are twice as many North Carolina residents born in New York as were born in South Carolina.” – From “Where We Came From, State by State”  by Gregor Aisch, Robert Gebeloff […]

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“Blowing Rock was a summer resort, and a rather posh one. Lured by the area’s beauty and cool summer air, wealthy families from throughout the Southeast maintained summer residences there. The Cannon textile barons had a huge estate, as did the R. J. Reynolds tobacco clan, and the Coca-Cola Snyders* from down in muggy Atlanta. […]

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The Class of 2018 began its studies at the UNC School of Medicine earlier this month. The class of 180 doctors-to-be is 48 percent female. That’s a far cry from 100 years ago, when Cora Corpening became UNC-CH’s first female med student. According to Gladys Hall Coates’ Seventy-fifth anniversary of the coming of women to […]

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“Asheville’s first drive-in was Buck’s Restaurant, founded by John ‘Buck’ Buchanan in 1946…. “The next drive-in to come to Tunnel Road was Wink’s, which had a radio tower and disk jockey perched on the roof during peak cruising hours. The DJ, writes [Rick McDaniel, author of  Asheville Food: A History of High Country Cuisine], ‘would […]

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“Players [in 1960] found in these small Carolina cities what they were wont to find. New Yorkers first found them oppressive, too tranquil, and lamented their inaccessibility to Coney Island…. “Drive-in restaurants where one could get a a variety of sandwiches and beer abounded in this era predating most national fast-food chains. The downtowns all […]

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