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Archive for the ‘Just A Bite’ Category

“Bribery laws directed at elections tended to criminalize vote buying instead of law buying (paying a candidate to get a law passed)…. “North Carolina passed an 1801 statute that prohibited [“treating,”] giving voters meat or drink or anything else of value on election day….. “The North Carolina Supreme Court in 1850 held that treating is  […]

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“[Naturalist John Muir seems to have had] an underlying ambivalence toward his Eastern associates. A friend once reported that after Muir and [Charles S. Sargent, director of Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum] reached the top of [Grandfather Mountain] in North Carolina, Muir ‘began to jump about and sing and glory in it all’ before he noticed Sargent […]

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“Redwood timber was in high demand during [World War II] because it not only did not warp but also had insulation properties, soundproofing capabilities and resistance to fire; so Roosevelt and [forester] Nelson Brown experimented with growing redwoods and sequoias on the East Coast…. “Roosevelt wrote Vice President Henry Wallace, ‘As you know, the rainfall […]

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One hundred years ago today the tall, rather awkward, not quite yet sixteen-year-old Thomas Clayton Wolfe boarded an early morning train in Asheville bound for Durham. There he was met by his brother-in-law who drove him the twelve miles over to Chapel Hill to enroll at the University of North Carolina. Wolfe had longed to […]

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“More than 100 years ago, when few states had road departments [North Carolina’s dates to 1915], a group of women planned one of our country’s first transcontinental highways, a good deed that over the course of a century has become controversial. “The road was planned in 1913 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy.  [The […]

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“[Author and blogger Joe] Haynes asserts that the popular North Carolina style is the result of a culinary crime, noting in [“Virginia Barbecue: A History”] that, among other things, ‘When settlers first moved into what is today North Carolina, it was known at that time as Virginia’s Southern Plantation.’ “In person, Haynes is more direct: […]

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“Once again, Maine Gov. Paul LePage is in trouble, and race is at the heart of the matter….  Talk is once again circulating about removing the governor from office. “Over the course of American history, there have been 17 instances of gubernatorial impeachment, with eight convictions resulting. The last governor to be impeached [was] Rod […]

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Happy 100th birthday to the National Park Service (NPS)! On August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the National Park Service Organic Act establishing the NPS as an agency within the U.S. Department of the Interior to coordinate administration of the then 37 national parks and monuments. Today the NPS oversees 412 parks, monuments, and […]

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“EDENTON — About 40 young women came out to Swain Auditorium in response to an open casting call to portray on camera Edenton-born  Harriet Jacobs. “Stacey Harkless, the film’s producer, said she would love to see a three-night miniseries. “Much of the story [will be filmed] in Edenton, because the town is an important part […]

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“The founders who crafted the original state governments… thought it was a good idea for ministers to stay out of politics. “The state constitutions of North Carolina (1776), New York (1777), Georgia (1777), South Carolina (1778), Delaware (1792),Tennessee (1796), Maryland (1799), and Kentucky (1799) all banned clergymen from running for office. “The 1776 North Carolina Constitution states that […]

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