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Archive for the ‘Just A Bite’ Category

“Page Putnam Miller, director of the National Coordinating Committee for the Protection of History, pointed out that in 1993 only 3 percent of the 2,000 national historic landmarks in the United States focused on women…. “According to a 1995 study by the Colorado Historical Society, ‘No markers interpret women or women’s experience in Colorado,’ no […]

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“The price African American owners of property along bodies of water (or places that would become bodies of water) paid for the South’s ‘progress’ in the decades following the death of Jim Crow was, quite often, their land…. “The U.S. Corps of Engineers began drawing up plans for the creation of Jordan Lake, which would […]

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“Perhaps [no populist politician in the South and West] used barbecue more effectively than Eugene Talmadge, who served three terms as governor of Georgia…. “In 1932 he kicked off his first campaign with a rally in his hometown of McRae. Local farmers donated over 10,000 pounds of pigs and goats, and they were cooked over […]

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“In the important town of Charlotte, North Carolina, I found a white man who owned the comfortable house in which he lived, who had a wife and three half-grown children, and yet had never taken a newspaper in his life. He thought they were handy for wrapping purposes, but he couldn’t see why anybody wanted […]

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“Correction: An earlier version of this column misstated the title of a 1960s television series named for its star. It was ‘The Andy Griffith Show,’ not ‘The Andy Griffin Show.’ ” – From “Recalling TV’s Golden Age, Stars Pitch Products Tied to Their Shows”  in the New York Times (Dec. 5)  

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“I’m an editor at The Duke Chronicle, and I received a request from a researcher at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Journalism to fill out a survey designed to ‘identify attitudes toward the implementation of monetization of mobile media products.’ Pretty standard stuff in media research these days. But here’s the punch line: it came […]

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“Beginning in the nineteen-thirties, fans thronged Philadelphia’s Municipal Stadium for the Army-Navy football game…. The game was frequently held on the Saturday after Thanksgiving, and just as visiting fans were showing up the day before, holiday shoppers also would descend on downtown…. The cops nicknamed the day of gridlock Black Friday, and soon others started […]

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“Thomas Hart Benton… counterposed the truth of his art against the lies of advertising in an account of his dispute with the American Tobacco Company in 1943. “The company, pioneering what has become a standard business practice, sought to counteract its federal conviction for price-fixing by hiring N.W. Ayer to surround it with ‘jes’ folks’ […]

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One day, I’ll look back fondly and tell my grandkids about the week I spent flooding the planet. It began as a lark. For the past few months, I’ve been writing installments of a serialized science fiction novel about a world in which the oceans have risen nearly 80 meters and most of the human […]

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“…I clicked immediately, curious to see ‘the most famous book’ set in North Carolina. Would it be Thomas Wolfe’s ‘Look Homeward Angel?’ Charles Frazier’s ‘Cold Mountain’? Or maybe ‘A Long and Happy Life,’ the debut novel that vaulted Reynolds Price to national fame? “Wrong, wrong and wrong. The most famous book set in North Carolina, […]

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