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Archive for the ‘Tar Heelia’ Category

Our October Artifact of the Month, a 50-cent note, was issued by a merchant in an uncommon and now obsolete profession. The note is a rare survivor of private North Carolina paper money issued because of the Civil War. I’ll bet many of you join me in what until recently was my ignorance of the […]

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In honor of the official opening day of the 2015 North Carolina State Fair we bring you fried foods from our cookbook collection. Clam Fritters from From coastal Carolina cupboards. Fried Raccoon, Panamanian Style from The wild and free cookbook. Orange Fritters from Keepers of the hearth : based on records, ledgers and shared recipes […]

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On May 7, 1915 off the coast of Ireland at 2:10 in the afternoon, on the final days of its trans-Atlantic journey to Liverpool, a torpedo fired by a German submarine slammed into the side of the RMS Lusitania. A mysterious second explosion ripped the passenger ship apart. In the chaos, many jumped into the […]

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A sampling of provocative if sometimes puzzling filler items happened upon in the California Digital Newspaper Collection: “The North Carolina Legislature, on account of the great destitution throughout that state, has passed a bill postponing the payment of private debts 12 months. The people of Pitt County had nearly compelled the Sheriff to burn the […]

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Several new titles just added to “New in the North Carolina Collection.” To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the “New in the North Carolina Collection” tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in […]

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“A professor of history at the university in Chapel Hill believes [Tar Heel] should be two words….and he has been campaigning quietly to get the matter corrected and standardized…. “William Powell has petitioned Merriam-Webster… whose definition in Webster’s Third Unabridged Dictionary reads: ‘tarheel, also tarheeler: from Tarheel State, nickname for North Carolina; a North Carolinian […]

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As many North Carolina public school students wrap up their first week back in the classroom, we salute the state’s 175-year history of providing free education. North Carolina’s first free school opened on January 20, 1840. It was near the present-day community of Williamsburg in Rockingham County. Although the school no longer stands and its […]

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Any UNC alum who’s recently been on campus knows just how much student fashions have changed since their own time at Carolina. Next February, the North Carolina Collection plans to open an exhibition exploring clothing styles at UNC as they’ve evolved over time. We’d love your help! We’re in search of clothing to represent every […]

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The dig had turned up many Native American artifacts, which are common in the region — but also some European artifacts. At the time, Mr. Luccketti hypothesized that they had been left by later European settlers, from a nearby plantation or the homestead of a trader who arrived in the mid-1600s. But the recent insights […]

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Several new titles just added to “New in the North Carolina Collection.” To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the “New in the North Carolina Collection” tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in […]

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