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This Sunday is the third Sunday in July and that means ice cream!  Celebrate National Ice Cream Day with your favorite flavor.

kitchenkapers00pres_0054

Ice Cream Poem from Kitchen kapers.

Cheerwine Ice Cream - Cooking on the Cutting Edge

Cheerwine Ice Cream from Cooking on the cutting edge.

Peach Marshmallow Ice Cream - Given to Hospitality

Peach Marshmallow Ice Cream from Given to hospitality : a cook book.

Ice Cream (Milky Way) - Carolina Cooking

Ice Cream (Milky Way) from Carolina cooking.

Coffee Ice Cream Supreme-Vegetarian Delights

Coffee Ice Cream Supreme from Flavors of Fearrington : the village where neighbors care and community is alive.

Lavender Ice Cream-Flavors of Fearrington

Lavender Ice Cream from Flavors of Fearrington : the village where neighbors care and community is alive.

Ginger Ice Cream - Capital City

Ginger Ice Cream from Capital city cook book : a collection of practical tested receipts.

Ice Cream Sandwiches - Rush Hour Superchef!

Ice Cream Sandwiches from Rush hour superchef! : with step-by-step menus.

“At the very least, we can definitively trace the term to 1937, when it was used in a popular song. It is likely that Cackalacky’s etymology runs much deeper, however….

“It may have arisen from a kind of sound-play utterance used to refer to the rural ways of people from Carolina — a play on the pronunciation of the state.  Another hypothesis is that Cackalacky was derived from the Cherokee term tsalaki, pronounced ‘cha-lak-ee,’ the Cherokee pronunciation of Cherokee. Yet another hypothesis traces it to a cappella gospel groups in the American South in the 1930s, who used the rhythmic (but apparently meaningless) chant clanka lanka in their songs. Derivations related to the German word for cockroach (kakerlake) and a Scottish soup (cockaleekie) have also been suggested….

“Certainly the popularity of Cackalacky has risen in the last decade, and it has now become a positive term of solidarity used throughout the state. We favor the sound-play etymology for Cackalacky, but we are honesty just venturing our best guess….”

– From “Talkin’ Tar Heel: How Our Voices Tell the Story of North Carolina” by Walt Wolfram and Jeffrey Reaser (2014)

This is not, of course, the Miscellany’s first or even second swat at the elusive origins of Cackalacky, and it likely won’t be the last.

 

skydiving photo

F.J. Hale with canopy (skydivers’ term for parachute), circa early 1970s.

Francis J. Hale, co-founder of the UNC Parachute Club, recently dropped in with July’s Artifacts of the Month. Hale, Class of 1973, organized the Club in 1969 with fellow student Bob Bolch. Not surprisingly, the University did not easily warm to the idea of its students jumping out of airplanes. Hale recalls “The athletic department wanted nothing to do with us. I nagged the devil out of them, until I finally got some old warm up suits from the swim team.” Undaunted by the University’s lack of enthusiasm, the Club designed suits, acquired equipment, and thrived. Members were soon winning trophies in regional contests with other parachute clubs.

yearbook photo

F.J. Hale with his ParaCommander Mk1 parachute in his 1973 Yackety Yack photo.

Army regulations were looser back in those days and Club members were allowed to jump with the 18th Corps Sport Parachute Club at Fort Bragg and later the Green Beret Parachute Club. According to Hale, UNC Parachute Club members didn’t spend too much time at Fort Bragg, but hanging around the seasoned soldiers there opened their eyes “a little too wide.”

Also included in this gift is a helmet with camera, a t-shirt with logo designed by team member Canda Sue Reaugh, a logo pendant, and, most priceless of all, the stories Hale told us about his experiences as a student. Understandably, Hale is holding onto his Parachute Club jacket, which, like his 1969-1973 jumpsuit, still fits!

man in parachute gear

It still fits! F.J. Hale in his circa 1969-1973 UNC Parachute Club gear, June 2014.

“I’d spent most of the day in the archives of the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where a patient young archivist named Aaron Smithers had played me a stack of Blind Blake 78s….

“Despite most [78 rpm record] collectors’ contentious relationship with academia and with archives in particular, many still posthumously bequeath their records to institutions rather than burdening their already strained estates with thousands of pounds of shellac. The Southern Folklife Collection’s curator, Steve Weiss, estimated that nearly 95 percent of the SFC’s holdings were sourced from private collections….

“Interestingly, Weiss was grateful for collectors’ contributions not just to the archive he oversees but also to the broader notion of folklore as a viable academic pursuit — a field that didn’t really blossom until the 1950s and ’60s…. ‘They really have preserved the music, and they’ve promoted the music,’  he said. While there was sometimes tension between collectors and academics, there was symbiosis, too.”

– From Do Not Sell At Any Price: The Wild, Obsessive Hunt for the World’s Rarest 78rpm Records” by Amanda Petrusich (2014)

 

Several new titles just added to “New in the North Carolina Collection.” To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the “New in the North Carolina Collection” tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in the University Library Catalog and they are all available for use in the Wilson Special Collections Library.

French Omelet - Cook Book

French Omelet from Cook book.

Oven omelet - The Charlotte Cookbook

Oven Omelet from The Charlotte cookbook.

Spinach Mushroom Omelet - Pass the Plate

Spinach Mushroom Omelet from Pass the plate : the collection from Christ Church.

Shrimp Omelet-Tarheels Cooking for Ronald's Kids

Shrimp Omelet from Tarheels cooking for Ronald’s kids.

Omelette au Natural - Waldensian Cookery

Omelet au Natural (Plain Omelet) from Waldensian cookery.

Western Omelet - What's Cook'n at Biltmore

Western Omelet from What’s cook’n at Biltmore.

cheese zucchini omelet - What's Left is Right

Cheese Zucchini Omelet from What’s left is right : what to do with leftovers when you’re desperate.

Corned beef omelet - Soup to Nuts

Corned Beef Omelet from Soup to nuts : a cook book of recipes contributed by housewives and husbands of Alamance County and other sections of state and country.

 

“Ringgold, Ga., has a mayor who’s one generation removed from the Civil War.

“Joe Barger’s grandfather — that’s right, his grandfather — Jacob A. Barger served as a private for the South in North Carolina’s infantry. Mayor Barger grew up in Salisbury, N.C., about 35 miles north of Charlotte.

” ‘He was born in 1833,’ Barger said. ‘So it’s 96 years’ difference between when he was born, and I was born.’

“The births were spaced that way because both Barger’s grandfather and father married younger women after their first wives died.

“Being the grandson of a Civil War soldier is so unusual, the 84-year-old mayor said, that when he tells people about it, ‘I don’t think they believe me.’ ”

– From “Civil War scion: Ringgold mayor is living history….” by Tim Omarzu in the Chattanooga Times Free Press (June 28)

 

“If you have any oyster shells lying around, the U.S. Army wants five dumptrucks’ worth. You don’t even have to include the delicious oysters inside. And they’re willing to pay up to $15,000 for them.

“That’s the gist of one of the stranger U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracts in recent memory. Last week, the Army put out a call for the empty shells — specifically, shells that have been ‘shucked and air dried,’ ready for transportation. There was, intriguingly, no additional detail….

“After I tweeted the bizarre contract on Thursday, Slate’s Matthew Yglesias speculated that the Corps sought to aid an existing project to rebuild the oyster population of Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay. Other guesses include the construction of good luck charms for the Navy; a crustacean-based fragmentation grenade; and, per the New York Times‘ Annie Lowrey, ‘scenic, Cape Cod-style driveways’….

“But it turns out the shells are destined for the southeastern corner of Roanoke Island, N.C. abutting Wanchese Harbor. That’s where the Army Corps of Engineers has a marsh creation and restoration project. There’s no military value to the enterprise; it’s part of the Corps’ longstanding civil works and environmental mission. To complete it, the Army needs 4,000 bushels of oyster shells.”

– From “Army Is Buying 4,000 Bushels of Empty Oyster Shells” by Spencer Ackerman  (July 25, 2012) at Wired

And let’s not forget “oyster-tecture.”

 

On this day in 1836: A new element appears in North Carolinians’ celebration of the Fourth of July — the “occasional popping of squibs,” as the Tarboro Free Press refers to firecrackers.

 

American Lasagna - A Taste of the Old and the New

American Lasagna from A Taste of the old and the new.

All American Hamburgers - Family Circle

All-American Hamburgers from The Family circle cookbook.

Early American Casserole - Favorite Recipes of the Carolinas

Early American Casserole from Favorite recipes of the Carolinas : meats edition, including poultry and seafood.

Martha Washington Creams - Nightingales in the Kitchen

Martha Washington Creams from Nightingales in the kitchen.

American Raised Waffles - Keepers of the Hearth

American Raised Waffles from Keepers of the hearth : based on records, ledgers and shared recipes of the families connected with Mill Prong House, Edinborough Road, Hoke County, North Carolina.

D.C. Spoon Bread - America Cooks

D. C. Spoon Bread from America cooks : practical recipes from 48 states.

All American Apple Pie - Dixie Classic Fair

All-American Apple Pie from Dixie Classic Fair for Northwest North Carolina : favorite recipes from friends of the Fair.

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