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Posts Tagged ‘american heritage’

“Outside of East Tennessee the most extensive antiwar organizing took place in western and central North Carolina, whose residents had largely supported the Confederacy in 1861. Here the secret Heroes of America, numbering perhaps 10,000 men, established an ‘underground railroad’ to enable Unionists to escape to Federal lines. “The Heroes originated in North Carolina’s Quaker […]

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“In the South, intestine [internal] war continually raged inside the conventional war of strategy and maneuver being fought by the British and Continental armies. Intestine warfare was more than pitched; it fondly embraced cruelty, nighttime murders and hangings without trial…. “Or, as North Carolina Governor Abner Nash more vividly described the land that suffered it, […]

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“Curious crowds gathered in the hamlets and towns along the route [of Creek chieftain Alexander McGillivray, traveling from Georgia to New York in 1790 to negotiate a treaty with President Washington]. No incidents marred the journey, although many of the Carolina settlers had suffered from the forays of McGillivray’s warriors. “Indeed, at Guilford Courthouse, North […]

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“Born in 1850 on an eastern North Carolina plantation, my father’s mother was the proprietress of two slave girls who were her age, 12 or thereabouts, at the time of the Emancipation Proclamation. Many years later, when she was an old lady in her 80s and I was 11 or 12, she told me at […]

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“In talking with some of the people who live on the outer banks — bankers, they are called — I soon discovered that wrecks like that of the [Carroll A. Deering in 1921] have a way of serving as points of personal reference. One venerable gentleman who lives on Hatteras recalled that when the barkentine […]

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“When newspapers reported in 1991 that a fire in a Hamlet, North Carolina, chicken-processing plant had killed 25 workers who were trapped by locked doors, labor historians  recalled the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist fire in New York City, in which 146 garment workers were killed. It was a tragedy that helped bring about modern worker-safety laws. […]

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“I’ve never heard anybody in the North use the plural “Applebee’ses” that I heard once in North Carolina.” – From “The Southernness of the South: An Interview with Roy Blount, Jr.” in American Heritage, May 15, 2007

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“In 18th-century America, a time when large families living in small spaces made home life cramped, taverns served as communal living rooms…. “Records show that in 1755, of the seven or eight houses in the town of Salisbury, North Carolina, four were taverns or inns. One Rowan County clergyman summed up the situation succinctly when […]

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“The Revolution’s epochal battle between patriots and Tories came on October 7, 1780, at Kings Mountain on the North Carolina-South Carolina border, when some 900 rebels annihilated a force of about 1,200 loyalists, all Americans but for the British officer who led them. “The rebels took 698 prisoners and, for murky reasons of vengeance, held […]

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“The first known mention of a tornado in pre-colonial America was in the diary of a member of the 1586 Roanoke landing party. On June 23, he recounts, as the fleet of Sir Francis Drake stood at anchor off the North Carolina coast, there arose a tempest characterized by awesome spouts — the manifestation of […]

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