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Posts Tagged ‘asheville nc’

On this day in 1918: Concluding a rustic road trip that began nine days ago in Pittsburgh, inventor Thomas Edison, automaker Henry Ford, tiremaker Harvey Firestone and naturalist John Burroughs check into Asheville’s Grove Park Inn. The celebrity nature-seekers, who camped in tents by the mountain roads, were delayed along the way by crowds of […]

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– Captured battle flags returning to N.C. coast  (and not everybody is happy about it). – Tidbits of Tar Heelia tucked in David McCullough’s latest. – For Colored Agricultural Fair, “The whole city participated, just like Bele Chere.” – Nitrate negatives yield a (slow-loading) gallery of “Old Wilmington Mystery Photos.” – Who would steal Mitch […]

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“At precisely the same moment that Southern Appalachia was being irrevocably altered by widespread industrialization and immigration, social reformers and travel writers insisted on depicting the region as a remote outpost inhabited only by rawboned and coon-capped Anglo-Saxon Celtic (today’s Scotch-Irish) mountaineers. “Harding Davis published a short story in 1875 in Lippincott’s Magazine that excoriated […]

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– Remembering Charlie Justice’s last interview. – “If you chase barbecue dreams, someday, somewhere you’ll find yourself this way, too, sitting on a rusty folding chair in a town you’d never driven through before, eating vinegar-drenched lukewarm meat and sweet fried hush puppies from a foam tray. There’s no music. There’s no beer. But you […]

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Though the most celebrated, the Grove Park Inn wasn’t the final project of quinine magnate E. W. Grove.  In Swannanoa he created Grovement, a planned community ‘where people of moderate means can secure large lots at reasonable prices.’ ” According to this oral history, Grove envisioned “a neighborhood as close to his grandparents’ town in […]

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– “Like driving a Prius down Tobacco Road”? – Found: Scrapbook recording Marion textile strike of 1929. – Barbecue: Touchy topic or “community builder”? – Veteran protester chains self to Bradford pear (!). – Death noted: creator of Bojangles’ biscuits. Same week, chain opens first store in D.C.

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– How Charlotte got to be CHARLOTTE (while somehow retaining an amazing microhabitat or two). – How Asheville came to host its first  flash mob pillow fight (while still honoring its more traditional pastimes). –  How a covered wagon from Rowan County ended up on the second floor of a restaurant in New Washington, Indiana. […]

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On this day in 1920: Nearing the end of a national tour, Gen. John J. Pershing, commander of the U.S. Army during World War I, arrives in Asheville. Despite an influenza quarantine, hundreds are on hand to see Pershing’s private rail car, attached to the Carolina Special, pull into Biltmore station. During his three-hour stay […]

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– Click away a leisurely afternoon with these 206 images of Asheville from the Library of Congress. – “The Nylon Capital of the World… need not embellish its past with a bogus story about Leonidas Polk.” – The distinctive architecture of Gaston County’s oldest building “came down the Great Wagon Road.” – Hugh McColl Jr. […]

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On this day in 1897: President William McKinley, en route to Washington by train, arrives in Asheville for an overnight stay at the Biltmore House. George W. Vanderbilt is out of the country and has left in charge E.J. Harding, who precipitates a minor flap by briefly refusing entrance to the White House press. “Mr. […]

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