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Posts Tagged ‘charlotte nc’

On this day in 1917: Gen. Leonard Wood visits Charlotte to inspect possible sites for a World War I training camp. The result will be Camp Greene, built on 2,500 acres and named for Revolutionary War hero Nathanael Greene. The camp trains soldiers for less than two years, but rouses Charlotte’s economy and hastens its […]

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On this day in 1956: A subcommittee of the House Un-American Activities Committee convenes in Charlotte. Two days of hearings will single out Bill McGirt, a poet working at a Winston-Salem fish market, as the state’s top communist, but he and 10 other subpoenaed witnesses refuse to testify, and little new information surfaces. “The conclusion […]

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“[Charlotte’s] Baptists, Episcopalians, and Presbyterians counted on [Harry] Golden to provide the Jewish view on everything from Noah’s ark to Israel bonds. “True, it was sometimes irritating to give his all to a speech in  front of an appreciative church audience only to be asked afterward if he knew ‘Mr. Cohen, who lived next door […]

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On this day in 1950: Charlotte hires the state’s first meter maids. Dubbed the “Skirt Squad” or “Petticoat Patrol,” their only duty is to issue parking citations. It will be 1967 before the city hires its first women as sworn police officers. .

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“The black-and-white photograph looks like yet another portrait of a bright-eyed, fresh-faced, all-American World War II recruit…. “What makes the photo historic? The young Marine pictured, Howard P. Perry [of Charlotte], was the first African-American Marine recruit in 167 years.  “Especially after America entered what became World War II, the rigid, proud, traditional Marines were […]

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“Two aspects of life in Charlotte intrigued [Harry] Golden from the minute he arrived in the early 1940s: hookers and segregation. ” ‘All the whores frequented the post office,’ he wrote. ‘On a weekday evening, dozens of salesmen repaired to the Charlotte post office to send in their reports to home offices in Cincinnati or […]

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“While the integration of white and black athletes in the 1960s and ‘70s took place with relatively few problems, cheerleading squads were more problematic. “Pamela Grundy, a [Charlotte] sports historian, told a crowd at the county library [in Brevard] that ‘Either you can hit the basket or you can’t…. It’s clear who’s good…. Cheerleading was […]

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“On February 1 [1965, James] Brown and his band stopped by Arthur Smith Studios in Charlotte, North Carolina, en route to a show, and laid down ‘Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag’ in a hour…. They did it in one take. It was suppose to be a run-through, but Brown knew he had to leave […]

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“North Carolina’s Senator Josiah Bailey, who voted against the Federal Emergency Relief Act and the National Recovery Administration in 1933, publicly worried about the burden on his poor state to meet the act’s one-third matching funds requirement…. “When the act passed, $40 million was distributed over three years in the state for public projects and […]

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On this day in 1930: A throng estimated at 30,000 to 50,000 is on hand for Charlotte’s first air mail delivery. The carrier is Eastern Air Transport, later to be Eastern Air Lines. The story in the next day’s Observer begins: “Roaring out of the darkness of the south, Gene Brown, intrepid air flier of […]

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