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Posts Tagged ‘david williams’

“The Lumbees of eastern North Carolina at first declared neutrality but became solidly pro-Union after Confederates  began conscripting them to do forced labor, essentially enslaving them. Lumbee guerrilla bands took revenge by raiding plantations, attacking Confederate supply depots, tearing up rail lines and doing whatever else they could to disrupt Rebel operations.” – From “Bitterly […]

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“Planters in the low country of North Carolina… were terrified to learn that, as one wrote, Unionists among the lower classes had ‘gone so far as to declare [that they] will take the property from the rich men & divide it among the poor men.’ “It was no idle threat. From near the war’s beginning […]

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“In February 1864, a North Carolina government official wrote: ‘Desertion takes place because desertion is encouraged…. And though the ladies may not be willing to concede the fact, they are nevertheless responsible’…. “One woman not only conceded her encouragement of desertion, she made it publicly clear. At the rail depot in Charlotte, she called to […]

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“Some [Confederate] states passed ‘stay laws’ to prevent confiscation of soldiers’ property in their absence or postpone it until after the war. But creditors would have none of it…. Jonathan Worth — a North Carolina slaveholder, cotton planter, mill owner and speculator [and future governor, 1865-68] — complained that the stay law ‘disorganized Civilized society.’ […]

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“For slaves in the tidewater regions of North Carolina and Virginia, the Great Dismal Swamp offered a refuge. In the North Carolina swamp counties of Camden and Currituck, a band of fugitives numbering between 500 and 600 made frequent raids on plantations and Confederate supply depots. “Frightened planters urged authorities to stop the raiders, but […]

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“In western North Carolina, some members of the Eastern Cherokee band expressed a willingness to serve with the Confederacy, but racism nearly kept them out of the ranks. William Thomas, an influential friend of the Cherokees, tried to get a state bill passed authorizing him to raise a Cherokee battalion. The legislature voted it down, […]

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“Many draft officials themselves were hardly enthusiastic about having to force men into service…. Some suspected that dragging unwilling men from their dependent families did the Confederate cause more harm than good…. A North Carolina lieutenant assigned to enforce the draft wrote of the recruiting forays he made: ” ‘I witnessed scenes & compelled compliance […]

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