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Posts Tagged ‘jim crow’

“Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore [in “Gender and Jim Crow”] recounts a debate on a summer night in 1901 in Charlotte, North Carolina, between two well-educated young women, Addie Sagers and Laura Arnold, on the topic ‘Is the South the Best Home for the Negro?’ “Sagers argued against going North, where, she said, the only jobs open […]

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“As the civil rights movement heated up in the ’60s and ’70s, [the work of Magnum photographers] became increasingly pointed and political, but they were also often overshadowed by the swelling media coverage of spectacular and typically violent scenes. It was easier to distill the emblematic structures of Jim Crow during the more quiescent 1950s, […]

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“Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina have adopted similar policies to combat the migration of their Negro laborers to northern industrial centers. “At Greensboro, N. C., a Negro named Charles Hampton was fined $500 for ‘secretly enticing’ 10 Negro laborers to take the train for Harrisburg, Pa.” – From Time magazine, June 4, 1923 ” ‘Go […]

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“North Carolina whites [circa 1900] often used the image of African-Americans wearing eyeglasses to play on the white supremacist envy of their audiences. Since many poor whites could not afford glasses and could not read or write so had no need for them, the image elicited a wide range of resentments.” – From “Gender and […]

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On this day in 1911: In Hamlet a freight train and a passenger train collide head-on, killing seven passengers and injuring 25. The passenger train had been loaded with Durham Sunday school members on an excursion to Charlotte. “Jim Crow service, using old wooden cars sandwiched between the newer steel ones, [subjected] those in the […]

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“The [1890s] laws that took the vote away from blacks — poll taxes, literacy tests, property qualifications — also often ensured that poor whites would not vote…. “The Charlotte Observer saw disenfranchisement as ‘the struggle of the white people of North Carolina to rid themselves of the dangers of the rule of negroes and the […]

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