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Posts Tagged ‘nc barbecue’

“Led by Jonas R. Kunst, a fellow at Oslo University’s Institute of Psychology, researchers found that descriptive terms such as ‘beef’ and ‘pork’  created emotional distance between consumers and the animals they were preparing to eat. “By alienating the animal through euphemism, these less representative terms made it much easier for consumers to eat meat. […]

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“[Author and blogger Joe] Haynes asserts that the popular North Carolina style is the result of a culinary crime, noting in [“Virginia Barbecue: A History”] that, among other things, ‘When settlers first moved into what is today North Carolina, it was known at that time as Virginia’s Southern Plantation.’ “In person, Haynes is more direct: […]

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“For some years, I’m now prepared to admit, I somehow labored under the impression that Rocky Mount is the line of demarcation that separates the two principal schools of North Carolina barbecue. Wrong. The line of demarcation is….” — From “In Defense of the True ’Cue: Keeping pork pure in North Carolina” by Calvin Trillin […]

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“Even if they cook over wood [rather than gas], some new places’ inclusion of ribs (not traditional in old-line barbecue joints) and brisket (from Texas, whose barbecue North Carolinians profess to despise) has created what [John Shelton] Reed dubs the International House of Barbecue. Even if they cook over wood, will new places serve a […]

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“It’s unfortunate to begin “Cooked” [by Michael Pollan] with a section about fire, since the world of barbecue is such a world of showboating. In this realm, ‘O.K., but that’s not barbecue,’ is a serious insult, and Ed Mitchell, who ‘just might be the first pit master to have handlers,’ refers to his own biography […]

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“The carvers splash the pulled pork with the house barbecue sauce, which balances sugar with vinegar and mustard; [restaurant owner Hugh]  Mangum calls it Texalina because it blends the styles of Texas and North Carolina….” –– From “Big League BBQ Arrives,” restaurant review by Pete Wells in the New York Times (March 5) Not unexpectedly, […]

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— Art Pope profile clarified … praised  … and  panned as “tendentious, poorly-researched, and weakly argued.” — Is Pinehurst risking its National Historic Landmark status? — In Los Angeles Times, Charleston chef deconstructs Texas governor’s insult to North Carolina barbecue.  

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— Remembering Charlie Justice’s last interview. — “If you chase barbecue dreams, someday, somewhere you’ll find yourself this way, too, sitting on a rusty folding chair in a town you’d never driven through before, eating vinegar-drenched lukewarm meat and sweet fried hush puppies from a foam tray. There’s no music. There’s no beer. But you […]

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— “Like driving a Prius down Tobacco Road”? — Found: Scrapbook recording Marion textile strike of 1929. — Barbecue: Touchy topic or “community builder”? — Veteran protester chains self to Bradford pear (!). — Death noted: creator of Bojangles’ biscuits. Same week, chain opens first store in D.C.

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— Tourism insurgents: “There’s more to Mount Airy than Mayberry.” — Barbecue Confidential: “It’s so minimalist — dressed with only a little bit of vinegar, salt and pepper. It’s hard to argue with that.” — But really, Mr. Bourdain, for an old-fashioned barbecue tempeh sandwich you still can’t beat Asheville.

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