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Posts Tagged ‘reconstruction’

“For black political leaders, the Bible — the one book with which they could assume familiarity among their largely illiterate constituents — served as a point of reference for understanding public events. “When in 1870 North Carolina’s House impeached Gov. [W.W.] Holden, 17 black legislators issued an address that began: ‘Know ye that since the […]

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“In some states in the early years… Redeemers [Southern Democrats after Reconstruction] gerrymandered black strength into restricted areas and conceded certain offices to blacks in return for other offices for whites …. “In North Carolina, the Redeemers created the ‘Black Second’ Congressional District to absorb a great portion of black votes in the state. In […]

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“Gov. Jonathan Worth, elected in 1865, had earlier in his career steered to passage the bill establishing public education in North Carolina, but he now persuaded the legislature to abolish the state school system altogether…. The governor feared that if white children were educated at public expense, ‘we will be required to educate the negroes […]

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“[North Carolina’s Josiah] Bailey became the first Southern senator to outline what he perceived as a dangerous aspect of the [1937] antilynching measure…. To him, it  represented the vanguard of a much larger movement aimed at dismantling Southern society. ” ‘I fear it, I dread it, I fight it, I argue against it because I […]

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“[Some former slaveholders] sought to ‘drown our troubles in a sea of gaiety,’ reviving the aristocratic social life of the antebellum years as if nothing had changed. “Tournaments straight out of  ‘Ivanhoe,’ complete with knights adorned with lances and plumed helmets and ladies competing to be crowned Queen of Love and Beauty, made an incongruous […]

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“The ownership of church property provoked bitter controversy [during Reconstruction]. A case in point: the Front Street Methodist Church in Wilmington, North Carolina,  whose congregation before the war numbered about 1,400, two-thirds of them black. “When Union soldiers occupied the city early in 1865, the black members informed Rev. L. S. Burkhead ‘that they did […]

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