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Posts Tagged ‘salisbury nc’

On this day in 1856: Benjamin Hedrick, chemistry professor at the University of North Carolina, publishes a defense of his abolitionist views in the North Carolina Standard of Raleigh. In response, the faculty denounces him, the board of trustees dismisses him and an unsuccessful attempt is made to tar and feather him at an educational […]

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“Ringgold, Ga., has a mayor who’s one generation removed from the Civil War. “Joe Barger’s grandfather — that’s right, his grandfather — Jacob A. Barger served as a private for the South in North Carolina’s infantry. Mayor Barger grew up in Salisbury, N.C., about 35 miles north of Charlotte. ” ‘He was born in 1833,’ […]

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On this day in 1863: Hungry and unable to pay inflated prices, 75 Salisbury women, most of them wives of Confederate soldiers, arm themselves with axes and go in search of hoarded food. The railroad agent turns them away from the depot, claiming he has no flour. They break into a warehouse, taking 10 barrels, […]

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On this day in 1982: Posing for a publicity shot, Food Town president Tom Smith climbs atop Store No. 1 in Salisbury to watch installation of new letters changing the name of his rapidly growing supermarket chain to Food Lion. The name has been changed to avoid conflicts with Food Town stores in Tennessee and […]

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On this day in 1864: Robert Moffat Livingstone, eldest son of missionary Dr. David Livingstone, is fatally injured in a riot at the Confederate prison at Salisbury. Young Livingstone, born in Africa and reared in Scotland, enlisted with a New Hampshire regiment using a false age (21, instead of 18) and name (Rupert Vincent). In […]

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– Attention Wikipedia: Eli Evans deserves his own page! His father already  has one. — Jamestown rifle was made for “the Joseph Taterdiggers and Thomas Cornshuckers of the 19th century.” — Goodbye, Vance-Aycock. Hello…what? Edwards-Easley? — Every town should have a Rose Post. Salisbury did.  

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“Virtually forgotten today, Joseph C. Price was once internationally celebrated…. W. E. B. Du Bois, who as a  college student heard Price lecture in Boston’s Tremont Temple, pronounced him ‘the acknowledged orator of his day.’…. After Price’s untimely death at the age of 39, Frederick Douglass lamented that ‘the race has lost its ablest advocate.’… […]

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On this day in 1865: A.O. Abbott, first lieutenant in the 1st N.Y. Dragoons, recalls the arrival in Goldsboro of a trainload of 700 fellow Union prisoners, these from Salisbury and Florence, S.C.: “They had ridden all night in open flatcars, without a particle of shelter or fire. It was . . . a bitter […]

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Tom Vincent, records management analyst at the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources, is the latest historian to take on the task of tallying the state’s Civil War monuments (and the first to have compiled a searchable database). . Tom, how many “standing soldier” Confederate monuments have you recorded? Fifty-four, out of a total of 110 […]

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“In 18th-century America, a time when large families living in small spaces made home life cramped, taverns served as communal living rooms…. “Records show that in 1755, of the seven or eight houses in the town of Salisbury, North Carolina, four were taverns or inns. One Rowan County clergyman summed up the situation succinctly when […]

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