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Posts Tagged ‘w j cash’

Q. What would [W.J.] Cash find most surprising about today’s South? A. The first would be the widespread acceptance of interracial marriage, which in 1941 would have been totally taboo to white Southerners — at least in the social sense, though of course in practical terms, interracial relationships have always been a fact of life […]

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“For a century after losing the Civil War, the South was America’s own colonial backwater — ‘not quite a nation within a nation, but the next thing to it,’ W.J. Cash wrote in his classic 1941 study, ‘The Mind of the South’…. “Cash has this description of ‘the South at its best’: ‘proud, brave, honorable […]

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On this day in 1941:  W.J. Cash writes Margaret Mitchell to explain a reference to her “Gone With the Wind” in his “The Mind of the South”: “About that ‘sentimental’ crack: thinking it over, I have an idea that what inspired that carelessly thrown-off judgment was the feeling that your ‘good’ characters were shadowy. “On […]

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– “Like no-one else’s, Mr. Taylor’s music distills a primal American yearning that can never be completely satisfied….” – Descendant adds color to “Arrangement in Black and White.” – “He will not be hanged until the mail train comes through tomorrow.” – Lost Cause was lost on W. J. Cash. – “We left Wilmington… to […]

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“At Wake Forest [W. J. Cash] became… a fan of H. L. Mencken, the acerbic Baltimore journalist who’d derided the South as ‘the Sahara of the Bozart’….  He wanted to write for Mencken’s magazine, American Mercury.  In 1929 [it] published his Menckenesque dismantling of U.S. Sen. Furnifold Simmons…. ‘the stateliest Neanderthaler who ever cooled his […]

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