Tom Bibey. The Mandolin Case. Chattanooga, TN: Ford, Falcon, & McNeil, 2010.

Hospitals, like small towns, are political places. Although crooked individuals can seem congenial, they have malice hiding up their sleeves. They try to get away with their evil deeds, and they often do until someone discovers their game.

The CEO of the hospital in rural Harvey County, North Carolina, is a shady character with something to hide. James Olden has always hated Dr. Henry “Indie” Jenkins, who is a physician at his hospital. When Indie’s patient and best friend, Blinky Wilson, dies under suspicious circumstances, Olden tries to find a way to benefit from the tragedy. He would like to see Indie out of his hospital – and even out of business. Olden recruits Blinky’s widow to join a suit against Indie; together they seek a large settlement.

Indie, heartbroken over the loss of his friend but sure that he made no errors to cause Blinky’s death, builds an incredible legal team with the help of his friend, Dr. James “Bones” Robertson. As the lawyers from both sides begin to understand ulterior motives of the plaintiffs, the case moves in Indie’s favor. Not only does Indie look innocent, but Olden does not. Picking up nuances in unlikely sources, Bones finds a way to ensure that his friend’s reputation is saved – and justice is served.

Indie and several other characters love bluegrass music; it gives them moments of comfort and pleasure.  As Indie suggested during the prolonged trial, sometimes in life music is the only thing that makes sense.

Check this title’s availability in the UNC-Chapel Hill Library catalog.

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Filed under 2010, 2010-2019, Bibey, Tom, Novels Set in Fictional Places

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