Events, Literary, North Carolina Collection, North Carolina History, Special Collections

North Carolina Dialects Are Topic of Sept. 25 Lecture

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Talkin’ Tar Heel: Understanding North Carolina’s History Through Speech
Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014
Wilson Special Collections Library
5:30 p.m. Program | Pleasants Family Assembly Room
Free and open to the public
Information: Liza Terll, Friends of the Library, (919) 548-1203

If you’ve ever spotted a whistle pig or know what a Kelvinator is, then you just might be fluent in Tar Heel.

The linguistic diversity and dialects of North Carolina will be the topic of a free public program Sept. 25 in Wilson Library. Linguists Walt Wolfram and Jeffrey Reaser will share stories, sights, and sounds from their book Talkin’ Tar Heel: How Our Voices Tell the Story of North Carolina (UNC Press, 2014).

North Carolina’s dialects go beyond the stereotypical Southern twang.  Wolfram and Reaser explore the distinct dialects of African-Americans, recent Spanish-speaking immigrants, mountain residents, the Cherokee and Lumbee, and the Hoi Toiders – “High Tiders,” a nickname for Outer Banks natives.

Talkin’ Tar Heel draws on two decades of research and 3,000 recorded interviews from across the state. Maps, illustrations, and online audio and video recordings enhance the publication.  Certain sections of the book include QR codes, allowing readers to access audiovisual supplements via smartphone.

Walt Wolfram is William C. Friday Distinguished Professor of English at North Carolina State University and co-author of Hoi Toide on the Outer Banks: The Story of the Ocracoke Brogue. Jeffrey Reaser is associate professor of English at North Carolina State University and co-author of the curriculum Voices of North Carolina: Language and Life from the Atlantic to the Appalachians.

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Related Links
Talkin’ Tar Heel: How Our Voices Tell the Story of North Carolina at UNC Press

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