This category contains 102 posts

Wootten & Johnston: Pioneer Female Photographers and North Carolina’s Preservation Movement

During the 1930s, photographers Bayard Wootten and Frances Benjamin Johnston documented the early architecture of the American South. Continue reading

Searching for Site Q: Exploration, Archaeology, and Decipherment at La Corona, Guatemala

An archaeological mystery will be the subject of the George E. Stuart Memorial Lecture at UNC’s Wilson Library on October 1. Continue reading

Photographs by Christopher Sims: Guantánamo Bay and The Library at Camp Delta

The built environments of Guantánamo Bay are shown in photographs on view in Davis Library beginning Sept. 30. Continue reading

Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas

More than 50 early printed volumes explore Spain’s discovery, conquest, and settlement of the New World. Continue reading

You’re Invited! Fall Events and Exhibits from Friends of the Library

Take a study break and bring a friend! Free lectures, music, exhibits, and films August through December. Continue reading

From Brunswick Stew to Barbecue: The Cookbook as Cultural History

Cookbooks from the North Carolina Collection showcases the range and history of cooking in the Tar Heel State in an exhibition on view in Wilson Library. Continue reading

Gone Home: Race and Roots through Appalachia

The Wilson Library exhibition about Harlan County, Kentucky, offers a window into the African American communities of Appalachia. Continue reading

UNC’s Hidden Campus Revealed in April 14 Lecture

UNC professor Stephen Davis will discuss the University in the 19th century, as discovered through two decades of archaeological exploration. Continue reading

Exhibition of Paintings by African American Artist J. Eugene Grigsby, Jr. To Open April 1

Reception at 5 p.m. in the library of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History. Continue reading

The Hidden Campus: Archaeological Glimpses of UNC in the Nineteenth Century

Coming March 19: A look at Carolina’s past through archaeological exploration. Continue reading