Holiday in the stacks: Doodily-doo edition

TR-12_245_Ralph Emery Show, 12_24_1971_Eugene Earle Collection One more tasty holiday treat from the Southern Folklife Collection. From the Eugene Earle Collection (20376), we have Del Reeves doodling’ away at his tune “Santa’s Boy.” This track appeared on transcription disc recording of the Ralph Emery Show, originally aired on Christmas Eve, 1971, call number TR-12-245.

Doodily-do everybody. We’ll see you next year.

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Transcription Disc TR/12-245

Ralph Emery Show No. 1184, 24 December 1971. Special Guest: Sonny James.

“Jingle Bells,” Roy Rogers and Dale Evans.
“Only Love Can Break a Heart,” Sonny James.
“Blue Christmas,” Elvis Presley.
“Kentucky,” Sammi Smith.
“Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer,” Gene Autry.
“I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day,” Ray Price.
“Santa’s Boy,” Del Reeves.
“Do You Hear What I Hear,” Sonny James.
“One’s on the Way,” Loretta Lynn.
“Here Was a Man,” Johnny Cash.
“Baby’s Smile, Woman’s Kiss,” Johnny Duncan.
“Silent Night,” Sonny James.

Holiday in the Stacks: Goldband edition

20245_pf0576_0002_Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245)
small_cfg More holiday tunes from the Southern Folklife Collection. This time from the great Rockin’ Sidney, master tape FT-6771 in the Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245). This tape was preserved in the Rivers Studio as part of a current Southern Folklife Collection digitization project, From the Piedmont to the Swamplands: Preserving Southern Traditional Music, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The legendary Count Rockin’ Sidney and the Dukes recorded well over 50 zydeco flavored R&B tracks for Shuler’s Goldband Records in the 1960s and 1970s, including this tight grooved holiday jam. From Count Rockin’ Sidney and the Southern Folklife Collection, may your X-mas be a “Soul Christmas” 

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FT6771 back

Rivers Dispatch: Christmas in Clarksdale (in June)

Wade Walton, Dockery Farms (ABP-15 #26)_William R. Ferris Collection_20367We’re starting our holiday party in the stacks early this year with a track from the William R. Ferris Collection (20367). This tape, call no. FT-10407, was preserved in the Rivers Studio as part of a current Southern Folklife Collection digitization project, From the Piedmont to the Swamplands: Preserving Southern Traditional Music, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Folklorist Bill Ferris celebrated Christmas in the summertime at Wade Walton’s barber shop in Clarksdale, Mississippi (pictured above). One of the patrons played a lively version of “Silent Night” before getting his hair cut. We’re not sure if the smoking monkey was involved, but one can hope. Happy holidays from the Southern Folklife Collection.

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Noble Ray Price, the Cherokee Cowboy

P3910_Standing from left to right: KBBQ disc jockey Hugh Jarrett, musicians Ray Price and Tex Williams, and tailor Nudie Cohn. The four are backstage at the KBBQ First Anniversary Show_Southern Folklife Collection Radio and Television Files (30015)P3910. Standing from left to right: KBBQ disc jockey Hugh Jarrett, musicians Ray Price and Tex Williams, and tailor Nudie Cohn. The four are backstage at the KBBQ First Anniversary Show. Southern Folklife Collection Radio and Television Files (30015).

Country legend, Ray Price died this week at his home in Texas at the age of 87. The “Ray Price Shuffle,” a 4/4 beat developed by the Cherokee Cowboy himself remains a staple of the honky tonk sound. Combined with his velvet voice and countrypolitan ballads, Price changed the sound of Nashville. We picked out a few items from the Southern Folklife Collection to share in remembrance of Price and his lasting legacy. The photo above, P3910 from the Southern Folklife Collection Radio and Television Files (30015) features Price along with one of his great friends, fashion designer Nudie Cohn. Price could often be found on stage wearing one of Cohn’s “Nudie Suits.”  Price’s visual style remained impeccable throughout his career, but it was always his voice that separated him from the rest of the crooners. Listen to his great rendition of the Harlan Howard tune, “Heartache by the Numbers” from call no. 45-1472. 

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45_1472_Ray Price_Southern Folklife CollectionAnother classic from Price’s massive catalog is his hit, “Take Me As I Am (or let me go). This Don Law produced single has the full “Nashville Sound,” a full orchestra and choral arrangement to back Price’s powerful voice and make the syrupy lyrics wonderfully bittersweet. We found a unique promotional flier for the song in the Southern Folklife Collection Artist Name Files (30005), NF1596. These items are but a blip in Price’s 65 year career. We’d love to show you more but you’ll have to make a visit to Wilson Library. For now, let’s sit back and enjoy one more song.

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NF1596_Ray Price_Southern Folklife Collection Artist Name Files (30005)45_1858_Ray Price_Southern Folklife Collection

 

 

Goldband Records approved “Sweet Potato Mash”

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Sweet potato patch in Cleveland County,

call no. P0072/0010, Commercial Museum Collection of North Carolina Photographs (P0072)

North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives.

Don’t forget your eat your sweet potatoes tomorrow. No matter whether you roast them, bake them, fry them, hasselback them, or cook them with marshmallows on top, the Southern Folklife Collection has your soundtrack covered thanks to a seasonally appropriate tape from the Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245) that came up in the Rivers Studio just this week.

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William Parker Guidry, Jr., came up in Southwest Louisiana and Lake Charles, performing and recording as Bill Parker for a number of labels, including Eddie Shuler’s Goldband Records. A drummer and bandleader, he appears all over the Goldband discography, and the man must have been a huge fan of the sweet potato because he wrote and recorded at least two tunes, including a cha-cha, dedicated to the noble tuber.

For you dear readers and listeners, we have “Sweet Potato Mash” by Bill Parker and his Showboat Band. FT7003 was digitized as part of the Southern Folklife Collection digitization project, From the Piedmont to the Swamplands: Preserving Southern Traditional Music, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Ham, corn and fiddle tunes at Tommy Jarrell’s

20006_pf0081_0029_Alice Gerrard Collection (20006)_Southern Folklife CollectionBack in 2009 we wrote about a field recording, call no. FS8341 from the Alice Gerrard Collection, documenting the Christmas she and Andy Cahan spent with Tommy Jarrell and his daughter Dena in 1983. For those who are interested, they had chicken and “it was so fine.”

That’s not the only holiday recording in the Alice Gerrard Collection. FS8205 was made in 1981 when Alice and a few others, including old-time musician Rusty Neithammer, spent Thanksgiving with Tommy. They had ham, and also some corn, according to the tape.

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How many other holiday menus and recipes were recorded in the process of doing field work that are now held in Wilson Library at UNC? These recordings and thousands more are available for research in the Southern Folklife Collection. There was quite a bit of music at that Thanksgiving celebration, listen to Jarrell’s solo banjo version of “Let Me Fall” and then Rusty Neithammer and Tommy Jarrell twin fiddle one of my favorites, “Rockingham Cindy.”

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The Southern Folklife Collection is thankful to be able to share this with all of you out there. Happy Thanksgiving.

In tribute to Harper Van Hoy and Fiddler’s Grove

1970_Brochure_CoverWe were saddened to learn that Harper Van Hoy passed away this week at the age of 92. Harper Van Hoy and his wife Wanona founded the Fiddler’s Grove, an old-time-music and family-oriented campground, which hosts traditional music and dance events throughout the year in Union Grove, NC. The Ole Time Fiddler’s & Bluegrass Festival, a fiddling competition, has been held annually in the spring since Fiddler’s Grove’s founding in 1970, and the Square-Up, a clogging competition was held in the fall until 1982. The fiddling festival, however, traces its history in Union Grove to 1924 when Harper Van Hoy’s father, H. P. Van Hoy, founded the Old Time Fiddlers Convention as a school fundraiser. To learn more about the history of Fiddler’s Grove and the Van Hoy’s legacy in Iredell County, NC, see the Southern Folklife Collection online exhibit Fiddler’s Grove: Retrospective 1977-2000. Items include photos of each year’s “Fiddler of the Festival,” including Ann Warren (1977) and Billy C. Hurt, Jr. (1987) below [photos by Ann Hawthorne], as well as fliers, winner’s lists, and other ephemera, like the 1971 poster featuring Doc and Merle Watson [click images to enlarge].

P-4547_Robin_Warren_1977_by Ann Hawthorne

1971_DocWatsonPosterP-4554_Billy C_Hurt_Jr_1987_photo by Ann Hawthorne

 

 

 

 

 

The Fiddler’s Grove Collection (20016) provides an overview of the history and operation of Fiddler’s Grove, and its main entertainment events, the Ole Time Fiddler’s & Bluegrass Festival and the Square-Up. The work of Harper Van Hoy and Wanona Van Hoy in building the reputation of Fiddler’s Grove as a gathering place for old-time music and family entertainment is documented throughout the collection. Also documented is the split between Harper Van Hoy and his brother, J. Pierce Van Hoy, which resulted in two competing Van Hoy-operated spring fiddling events in Union Grove, 1970-1979. General correspondence, newspaper clippings, promotional material, and other items go back to the founding of the Old Time Fiddlers Convention. Festival materials include participation registration information, lists of winners, judges’ notes, and correspondence, and other items. Also included are open-reel tapes, an eight-track tape, compact discs, and a videotape, all of which relate to the Ole Time Fiddler’s & Bluegrass Festival.

Harper Van Hoy, like his father H. P., was also a fine fiddler himself. Listen to him play “Soldier’s Joy” along with The Bluegrass Gentleman, recorded at the inaugural festival in 1970 and released as part of the excellent LP, Fiddler’s Festival 1970, Southern Folklife Collection call no. FC-787

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Photo-Sound Associates photo of the week: Mike Seeger, Bob Yellin, and Ralph Rinzler in Washington Square

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Image Folder PF-20239/090_01: Mike Seeger, Bob Yellin, and Ralph Rinzler, Washington Square jam session, NYC, ca. 1960. Photo by Ray Sullivan for Photo-Sound Associates.

Wilson Library has a new Tumblr!  To christen the site, the Southern Folklife Collection kicked off a weekly feature highlighting images from the Photo-Sound Associates photographs in the Ron Cohen Collection (20239). The Photo-Sound Associates photographs are black-and-white 35mm roll film negatives, documenting the folk revival movement in and around New York City that were taken by Aaron Rennert and Ray Sullivan. Photo-Sound Associates was organized by Rennert, Sullivan, and Joel Katz in Greenwich Village in connection with Lee Hoffman and Caravan magazine. Rennert and Sullivan did the photography, while Katz recorded the concerts. Bonus image, 20239_pf0090_01_0006, below. You didn’t need a banjo to join in at Washington Square Park. One string fiddle!  For more images, see the Ron Cohen Collection (20239).

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Rivers Studio Dispatch: Danny James and J. B. Fuselier

small_cfgTwo tracks this week from the Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245). These tapes were preserved in the Rivers Studio as part of a current Southern Folklife Collection digitization project, From the Piedmont to the Swamplands: Preserving Southern Traditional Music, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

First, from FT6770, the great guitarist Danny James (née Danny James Sonnier). A skilled session player, James had a productive solo career as well, his signiture guitar tone sliding through swamp blues and boogie. Instrumentals like ”Switchit,” showcase James backed by a solid southern soul ensemble, including horns. 

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FT6770_Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245)Another treat in the studio last week was a tape by Cajun fiddler J. B. Fuselier and his Merrymakers. Fuselier was a popular and innovative musician, recording a number of popular Cajun hits in the 1930s and 1940s, adding drums and steel guitar to his traditional Cajun ensemble. After WWII, Fuselier joined with Iry LeJune and the Calcasieu Playboys and the two ruled the dance hall circuit until 1955 when LeJune was killed and Fuselier severely injured when hit by a car while changing a tire at night on a dangerous South Louisiana highway. Despite his injuries, Fuselier never stopped playing and recorded a number of sides for Goldband in the 1960s, including “Think of Me,” from FT6857. We love the steel guitar and accordion arrangement, and Fuselier’s lonsome vocals make this a Cajun honkytonk heartbreaker perfect for Monday morning. 

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SFC Spooky Spotlight: A “Mummie’s Curse” uncovered in the Goldband Recording Corporation Collection

OP20459_16_Jason Lonon Collection, Death-Ray Design!.  Continental Club PosterWith the Wilson Library live action Clue Game happening tonight and All Hallow’s Eve tomorrow, it’s no surprise that strange phenomena have been occuring in the Southern Folklife Collection studios. Just this morning, preservation audio engineer Brian Paulson digitized the Goldband Records master tape of Satan and the Deciples, call no. FT6891 in the Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245), as part of our current digitization project, From the Piedmont to the Swamplands: Preserving Southern Traditional Music.

FT6981_ Satan and Deciples_Mummie's Curse_Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245)_Southern Folklife Collection, Brian arrived to work this morning, having left the Rivers Studio in proper order when he left last night, to find this open reel tape spooled on the Otari ready for playback. No one knows how the tape got from the stacks to the studio or what could have loaded the tape onto the machine. Not one to question the will and ways of the supernatural, of course Brian played the tape, reavealing the following horrifying song, “Mummie’s Curse.”

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Not much is known about Satan and the Deciples (aka Satan and Satin’s Roses, aka Satin and the Deciples). The theory we agreed upon in the Rivers Studio accepts that the band rose out of the swamps around Lake Charles, called from eternal slumber to terrorize the honky-tonks of East Texas like so many of the undead. Other more likely theories suggest the band was a novelty project made up of a crew of local bar band musicians that liked scary movies. Considering the Deciples featured one Baldemar Huerta (aka Freddy Fender who co-wrote both tracks on this tape) on lead guitar, the latter theory is more plausible. We may never know the truth, but we were inspired to pull out Jason Lonon’s poster for a “Halloween Ho-down” (featured above) to share with you fine readers, call no. OP-20451/16 from the Jason Lonon Poster Collection (20451).

Happy Halloween.