Monthly Archives: April 2012

SCL Picks for International Jazz Day

In addition to being National Poetry Month, did you know that April is also Jazz Appreciation Month?

“April was selected by the National Museum of American History, the originator of the tribute, because so many seminal people were born this month. The list includes Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Charles Mingus, Tito Puente and Herbie Hancock.” (Source: The Washington Post)
 

In addition, today – April 30th – also marks the inaugural observation of International Jazz Day! Whether you’ve been celebrating all month, all year, or just for today, here’s a sampling of related books available here at the SCL:

For more online resources, keep in mind the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web, which includes an ample music section under the category of “Arts.” Enjoy!

New @the SCL in POETRY

Happy National Poetry Month, y’all! Here are three poetry picks new to the SCL collection:

Coval K, Coval K. 2011. L-vis lives! : Racemusic poems. Chicago, Ill.: Haymarket Books. xvi, 103 ; p.
“From the poet the Chicago Tribune calls the new voice of Chicago, comes L-vis Lives!, a bold new collection of poetry and prose exploring the collision of race, art, and appropriation in American culture. L-vis is an imagined persona, a representation of artists who have used and misused Black music. Like so many others who gained fame and fortune from their sampling, L-vis is as much a sincere artist as he is a thief. In Kevin Coval’s poems, L-vis’ story is equal parts forgotten history, autobiography, and re-imaginings.” (Source: UNC catalog)

Griffiths R Eliza. 2011. Mule & Pear. Kalamazoo, MI: The College of Arts and Sciences Western Michigan Univerisity. 97 p.
“These poems speak to us with voices borrowed from the pages of novels of Alice Walker, Jean Toomer, and Toni Morrison — voices that still have more to say, things to discuss. Each struggles beneath a yoke of dreaming, loving, and suffering. These characters converse not just with the reader but also with each other, talking amongst themselves, offering up their secrets and hard-won words of wisdom, an everlasting conversation through which these poems voice a shared human experience.” (Source: Amazon)

Harriell D. c2010. Cotton : Poems. Detroit, Michigan: Willow Books. 77 ; p.
“In his remarkable debut collection, COTTON, Derrick Harriell has created a mural in poems. The characters that inhabit this vivid tableau step into an active third dimension and allow us to witness the vicissitudes of their daily struggles, triumphs large and small, private desires. The community here is anchored by a specific Midwestern, African-American family which, in spite of both external and internal challenges, maintains its unity, however precarious at times. Death, passion, humor, mother wit, history, place, these are the colors that Harriell mixes and applies with such artistry that readers may not be so sure if they are watching a particular world or if that world is watching them. Harriell is among America’s most exciting new voices in poetry.”–Maurice Kilwein Guevara (Source: Syndetic Solutions)

Looking for more poetry resources? In addition to searching the UNC catalog, don’t forget the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web has an extensive literature section, including several poetry-related sites. Happy reading!

New @the SCL: Head off & split (winner of the 2011 National Book Award in Poetry)

Is it us, or has April just flown by? As National Poetry Month winds down, we thought we’d highlight some recent acquisitions here at the SCL, starting today with a spotlight on Nikky Finney‘s National Book Award-winning anthology Head off & split : poems.

Widely praised, this collection artfully engages with a variety of timely topics. In the words of one reviewer:

“The poems in Nikky Finney’s breathtaking new collection Head Off & Split sustain a sensitive and intense dialogue with emblematic figures and events in African-American life: from Civil Rights matriarch Rosa Parks, to former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, from a brazen girl strung out on lightning, to a terrified woman abandoned on a rooftop during Hurricane Katrina. Her poet’s voice is defined by an intimacy, which holds a soft yet exacting-eye on the erotic, on uncanny political and family events, like her mother’s wedding waltz with S.C. Senator Strom Thurmond, and then again on the heart-breaking hilarity of an American President’s final state of the Union address. Artful and intense, Finney’s poems ask us to be mindful of what we fraction, fragment, cut off, dice, dishonor, or throw away, powerfully evoking both the lawless and the sublime.” (Source: http://nikkyfinney.net/books.html).

 

Interested in seeing what all the buzz is about? Be sure to come by the Stone Center Library and check out this book! More information about Head off & split and Nikky Finney herself may also be found on her website, and her acceptance speech for the 2011 National Book Award in Poetry is available on Vimeo.