Category Archives: Business

African American History and Culture: publications from UNC’s Center for the Study of the American South

If you haven’t already seen it, we highly recommend perusing the current issue of Southern Cultures, which is put out by UNC’s Center for the Study of the American South, and features a couple of articles of special interest:

–   “Bobby Rush: “Blues Singer–Plus,” written by William R. Ferris, who is Joel R. Williamson Eminent Professor of History, Senior Associate Director of the Center for the Study of the American South, and Adjunct Professor of Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

–   “For the Records: How African American Consumers and Music Retailers Created Commercial Public Space in the 1960s and 1970s South,” written by Joshua Clark Davis, who is a UNC-CH PhD and currently a fellow at the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C, researching “the globalization of African American music and consumer culture.”

In addition, the Center has conveniently compiled an extensive two-part collection of their publications on African American History and Culture, spanning the last ten years. Be sure to check it out here: Part I & Part II.

NEW SCL DISPLAY!

Have you been by the Stone Center Library lately? If so, you’ve hopefully noticed our new display:

Our latest selection of recently acquired books features titles related to African Americans in American culture, in keeping with our recent event with UNC history professor “Fitz” Brundage:

All titles are available here at the library and we encourage you to come by and check them out. Happy reading, and have a great weekend!

National Library Week 2011: Celebrate with more new books @the SCL!

Yesterday, we posted a handful of the new books currently on display here at the library.  Today, we continue with a selection of those books pertaining to the arts, identity, and untold stories of the African Diaspora.  Click on the links below for more information, or come see us at the Stone Center Library:

“Focusing on orally transmitted cultural forms in the Caribbean, this book reaffirms the importance of myth and symbol in folk consciousness as a mode of imaginative conceptualization.”

“Lorick-Wilmore (sociology, Northeastern U.) explores the specific role and functions of community-based organizations in the creation of Black ethnic identity options for Caribbean immigrants in New York City.”

“Allegory and Meaning is the study of the allegorical-cum-symbolic mode in selected African, African American, and Caribbean literary works. It argues that the domain of allegory in these works constitutes, at bottom, a contested site of paradoxes. The discussion of these African, African American, and Caribbean writers’ use of the allegorical mode is a serious attempt to recover the subtext of their works.”

“Afro-Cuban Diasporas in the Atlantic World explores how Yoruba and Afro-Cuban communities moved across the Atlantic between the Americas and Africa in successive waves in the nineteenth century.”

“This book looks at the experiences of the average black person in England and Wales during the period of the British slave trade. . . This book overturns many of the conventional assumptions that have been made about their lives. They were not enslaved, stigmatised outsiders but woven into English society as government officials, defenders of the country, tradesmen, entertainers and founders of families who have left a legacy of their presence in the form of descendants that in some cases can be traced to the present day.”

 

Stay tuned!  Coming tomorrow: new books on African and African-American religions.

Women’s History Month + new books display, part 1

Last week, we posted a list of new book titles currently on display near the library entrance.  Today and next week, we’ll be highlighting our in-library display, which this month features new arrivals related to women’s history across a variety of genres and topics.

March is Women’s History Month and this year’s theme is “our history is our strength.”  What better way to learn more about women’s history, achievements, and current challenges than turning to some more of the Stone Center Library’s new acquisitions?  Come check us out!