Category Archives: Civil Rights

IAAR Brown Bag – “The Voter Education Project and the Financing of the Black Freedom Movement: The Case of Monroe, Louisiana, 1963-1966”

The UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of African American Research (IAAR) begins its 2015-2016 series of graduate student brown bag lectures with a presentation by Evan Faulkenbury, PhD candidate in the UNC-CH Department of History.  The talk will be held on Monday, September 21, 2015 at 12:00pm in Room 309C of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center.

Faulkenbury’s talk is titled “The Voter Education Project and the Financing of the Black Freedom Movement: The Case of Monroe, Louisiana, 1963-1966” and all are welcome to attend.

The Stone Center Library staff has prepared a bibliography to accompany this lecture, the PDF of which can be found here.

IAAR Brown Bag – “Student Perspectives on Resegregation in NC Public Schools”

The UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of African American Research (IAAR) wraps up their spring 2015 series of brown bag lectures with a presentation by Shelby Dawkins-Law, UNC School of Education, titled “Student Perspectives on Resegregation in NC Public Schools”.

The talk will be held on Monday, April 13 2015 at 12:00pm in Room 309C of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center.

The Stone Center Library staff has prepared a bibliography to accompany this lecture, the PDF of which can be found here.

2015 UNC-CH African American History Month lecture – Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad

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Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad will deliver the 11th Annual African American History Month Lecture on February 17, 2015, in the Sonja Haynes Stone Center Auditorium.

In addition to being the Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Research and a sought-after speaker, Dr. Muhammad has published extensively, including his book The Condemnation of Blackness: race, crime, and the making of modern urban America, and several articles. Links to published articles, audio, and video interviews are included below.

ARTICLES
Muhammad, Khalil G. “White may be might, but it’s Not always Right.” The Washington Post Dec 09 2007. ProQuest. Web. 14 Jan. 2015.
Muhammad, Khalil G. “”Negro Stranger in our Midst”: Origins of African American Criminality in the Urban North, 1900–1940.” Order No. 3117624 Rutgers The State University of New Jersey – New Brunswick, 2004. Ann Arbor: ProQuest. Web. 14 Jan. 2015.
Muhammad, Khalil Gibran. “Where did all the White Criminals Go? Reconfiguring Race and Crime on the Road to Mass Incarceration.” Souls 13.1 (2011): 72-90. ProQuest. 14 Jan. 2015.
Muhammad, Khalil G. “Playing the Violence Card.” New York Times Apr 06 2012, Late Edition (East Coast) ed. ProQuest. 14 Jan. 2015.

VIDEO INTERVIEWS
Tavis Smiley Interview: Incoming director of the city’s famed Schomburg Center
The Root Interview: The Schomburg’s Khalil Gibran Muhammad
New York Times: Historian Will Direct Schomburg Center in Harlem
Moyers and Company: Confronting the Contradictions of America’s Past Jun 29 2012 (Video

AUDIO INTERVIEWS
Lake Effect’s Mitch Teich interviews author Khalil Gibran Muhammad on his book “The Condemnation of Blackness.”

 

IAAR Brown Bag – “Brazilian Quilombos: Historical & Contemporary Struggles”

The UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of African American Research (IAAR) will be holding the first in their spring 2015 series of brown bag lectures –  “Brazilian Quilombos: Historical & Contemporary Struggles” presented by Adam Bledsoe, UNC-CH Department of Geography – on January 12, 2015 at 12:00pm in Room 309C of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center.

The Stone Center Library staff has prepared a bibliography to accompany this lecture, the PDF of which can be found here.

 

SCL Picks: Oscars Edition

The 84th annual Academy Awards will take place this Sunday and among this year’s contenders is The Help, which has been nominated for four awards, including nods for Viola Davis (Best Actress) and Octavia Spencer (Best Supporting Actress). This film takes place in 1960s Mississippi and chronicles the intersecting lives of white women and their African-American maids against the backdrop of major social upheaval nationwide. Of course, before it was an Oscar-nominated film, The Help was a best-selling book, as reviewed by Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier in a previous SCL blog post, and available here at the Library.

Interested in learning more about African Americans and the film industry? Here, in no particular order, are ten titles to get you started:

The books listed above are but a sampling of related items available here at the Stone Center Library. Come by and check us out!

Black History Month Profile: James Weldon Johnson (1831-1938)

First performed publicly in February of 1900, “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing,” was composed by brothers James Weldon (text) and J. Rosamand Johnson (music). Originally conceived as a poem to commemorate Lincoln’s birthday, “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing” as a musical work has become a powerful symbol of the U.S. Civil Rights movement. Termed “the Black National Anthem” by some, this song also inspired a short-lived sculpture (“The Harp”) commissioned for the 1939 New York World’s Fair and created by Augusta Savage Jefferson. Given its cultural significance, and in honor of Black History Month, here at the Library we thought we would briefly spotlight the poet, educator, and activist behind the poem: James Weldon Johnson.

James Weldon Johnson (1831-1938) was born in Jacksonville, FL and went on to attend Atlanta University. The son of a schoolteacher, he returned to his alma mater Stanton Elementary School as principal. Concurrently, he purused legal studies and became the first African-American to pass the bar exam in the state of Florida. In addition to his significant contribution to the fields of education and law, Johnson was a prolific writer of poems, song texts, and fiction such as The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man. Active in the political arena as well, in 1920 he was appointed executive secretary of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), which ultimately adopted “Lift Every Voice and Sing” as its official song.

For a sampling James Weldon Johnson’s poetry available here at the Library, we recommend checking out:

For more on the artwork inspired by “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” consider this book, also available here at the Library:

And for a full list of books authored by James Weldon Johnson and available here at the SCL, check out the following list in the online catalog. Happy reading!

Sources consulted:

SCL Pick: “The Curse of Caste, or, the Slave Bride: a rediscovered African American novel”

Today marks the anniversary of the start of the Greensboro sit-ins in 1960 (and we encourage you to take a look at last year’s blog post about the history of the movement here).

Today also marks the start of Black History Month 2012, which was founded by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). This year’s theme is “Black Women in American Culture and History” and the ASALH has kindly prepared a summary of this topic which is available here.

Here at the Stone Center Library, we thought we’d jump-start this month with a little-known gem in our collection:

The Curse of Caste,or, the Slave Bride: a rediscovered African American novel, by Julia C. Collins

Considered “the first novel by an African American woman,” it takes place in antebellum Louisiana and Connecticut “and focuses on the lives of a beautiful mixed-race mother and daughter whose opportunities for fulfillment through love and marriage are threatened by slavery and caste prejudice.”

Take a look at the full summary here, or come by the library and check it out!

SCL Picks: MLK Day Edition!

Happy MLK Day, everyone! In commemoration of this day of service and reflection, here’s a quick list of recent books related to the path-breaking Martin Luther King Jr. All titles are available here at the Stone Center Library and we encourage you to come by and check them out!

All Labor Has Dignity: “An unprecedented and timely collection of Dr. King’s speeches on labor rights and economic justice”

Behind the dream : the making of the speech that transformed a nation: “a thrilling, behind-the-scenes account of the weeks leading up to the great event, as told by Clarence Jones, a co-writer of the speech and close confidant to King himself.”

Burial for a King : Martin Luther King Jr.’s funeral and the week that transformed Atlanta and rocked the nation: “Compelling and original, Burial for a King captures a defining moment in America’s history. It encapsulates King’s legacy, America’s shifting attitude toward race, and the emergence of Atlanta as a new kind of Southern city.”

Interested in U.S. Civil Rights more generally? Check out these recent SCL acquisitions:

For even more resources available here at the Library, take a look at last year’s MLK Day post, as well as the Civil Rights section of the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web. Happy reading!

UNC Chapel Hill 2012 Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Celebration

Reposted from UNC’s office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs, here’s a listing of activities taking place on campus next week in celebration of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. 

Join us at Carolina for a week of cooperatively planned events to commemorate the ideals of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Unless otherwise noted, all events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact UNC-Chapel Hill Diversity and Multicultural Affairs at (919) 962-6962 or by email.

Click on a date in the list below to see details, times, and locations for all events.

2012 UNC-Chapel Hill MLK Celebration Schedule

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15

TWENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL UNIVERSITY/COMMUNITY MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. MEMORIAL BANQUET

MONDAY, JANUARY 16

DAY FOR SERVICE
MLK YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM
RALLY, MARCH, SERVICE
UNITY DINNER
HE WAS A POEM, HE WAS A SONG

TUESDAY, JANUARY 17

CANDLELIGHT VIGIL

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18

KAPPA OMICRON CHAPTER OF DELTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY, INC.’S ANNUAL MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. ORATORICAL CONTEST

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19

QUIZ BOWL
POPULAR MOVEMENTS: A PANEL DISCUSSION

FRIDAY, JANUARY 20

SCREENING AND DISCUSSION OF DOCUMENTART “PRECIOUS KNOWLEDGE”
“I, TOO, SING AMERICA”

NEW SCL DISPLAY!

Have you been by the Stone Center Library lately? If so, you’ve hopefully noticed our new display:

Our latest selection of recently acquired books features titles related to African Americans in American culture, in keeping with our recent event with UNC history professor “Fitz” Brundage:

All titles are available here at the library and we encourage you to come by and check them out. Happy reading, and have a great weekend!