Category Archives: Non-Fiction

Mirrored on the Stage: A Selection of Books on African and African-Diaspora Theater

Stories are an integral part of how we understand our communities—both their histories and our place within them. Theater is uniquely suited to this function, as every dramatic performance creates space removed one step from reality. On the stage, we can explore not just who we are, but who we might be.

A highlight of Telling Our Stories of Home, an ongoing 6-day conference-festival that brings artists, activists, and scholars together to examine the concept of “home” in African and African-Diaspora communities, will be the performance of Torn Asunder, a specially commissioned play based on the book Help Me to Find My People by Heather Williams, that focuses on the quest of African-American families to reunite after the Civil War.

It is from Torn Asunder that we take our cue, providing some complementary resources that expand on the intersection of theater and TOSH’s theme of “home.” The following list consists of a small selection of the Stone Center Library’s theater-related books that we hope will spur your imagination and curiosity in this fascinating and vital discussion. All quoted summaries are taken from the UNC-CH library catalog.

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“So be it! See to it!”: A Celebration of Octavia Butler

Handwritten notes from one of Octavia Butler’s notebooks. Photo from the Huntington Library’s blog.

Feb. 24, 2016, marks the 10thanniversary of the death of Octavia Butler (1947 – 2006), known as the “grand dame of science fiction.” Her books and short stories critiqued contemporary power structures while imagining a radical new future, addressing issues of class, race, gender and sexuality along the way. Her powerful visions of the world as it could be helped kickstart a new literary genre: Afrofuturism, an examination of the intersection between race and technology that envisions the future while interrogating the past.

A lifelong writer, Octavia Butler’s body of work includes twelve novels and two short story collections. Her novels have won numerous honors and awards within the science fiction community and beyond. In 1995, she became the first science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Fellowship, also known as the “Genius Grant.”

The Stone Center Library is proud to join the celebration the literary impact of Octavia Butler’s life. Many of Octavia Butler’s writings are available at UNC Libraries, so rather than list her novels, we would like to highlight the literary conversation that is part of her legacy.

In this post, we’ve gathered books that feature discussion of Octavia Butler’s work, analyzing its themes and looking at it in the context of African American, science fiction, and Afrofuturist literature.

All of these books are available at the Stone Center Library. Each title links to the book’s UNC Library catalog entry, where you can check their availability and learn more about them. Each entry is also accompanied by quote from the book’s official description.

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Rosenwald Schools: UNC Resources

If last week’s post on the history of the Rosenwald Schools piqued your interest, here’s a sampling of related resources available in several libraries on campus:

 Ascoli, Peter Max. Julius Rosenwald : the Man Who Built Sears, Roebuck and Advanced the Cause of Black Education in the American South. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006. Print.

Deutsch, Stephanie. You Need a Schoolhouse : Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 2011. Print.

Embree, Edwin R. Negro Progress Since Emancipation : Address Delivered at Dedication of the 5000th Rosenwald School, Greenbriar, Va., November 21, 1930. Atlanta, Ga.: Commission on Interracial Cooperation, 1931. Print.

Hanchett, Thomas W. The Rosenwald Schools and Black Education in North Carolina. 1988. Print.

Hoffschwelle, Mary S. The Rosenwald Schools of the American South. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2006. Print.

Merriwether, Lucile. High School Library Service in Tennessee Rosenwald Demonstration Units,. Peabody library school, 1934. Print.

Julius Rosenwald Fund. Committee on School Plant Rehabilitation. Improvement and Beautification of Rural Schools; Report of Committee on School Plant Rehabilitation. Rosenwald Fund, 1936. Print.

Reed, Betty Jamerson. The Brevard Rosenwald School : Black Education and Community Building in a Southern Appalachian Town, 1920-1966. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co., 2004. Print.

Sanders, Wiley Britton. Negro Child Welfare in North Carolina, a Rosenwald Study,. Pub. for the North Carolina State Board of Charities and Public Welfare by the University of North Carolina Press, 1933. Print.

Shields, Carol Jones. Hamilton Rosenwald School Preservation Story : Preserving the Memories, the Faces, and the Place. Windsor, N.C.: Roanoke River Partners, 2011. Print.

Sosland, Jeffrey K. A School in Every County : the Partnership of Jewish Philanthropist Julius Rosenwald & American Black Communities. Washington, D.C.: Economics & Science Planning, 1995. Print.

United States. Division of Cooperative Extension. Report of Special Summer Schools for Negro Extension Agents Under the Direction of Office of Cooperative Extension Work, United States Department of Agriculture in Cooperation with Federal and State Extension Services of the Southern States, Partially Financed by Julius Rosenwald Fund, Held at Orangeburg, S.C., Nashville, Tenn. [and] Prairie View, Tex., August 1930. 1930. Print.

Weatherford, Carole Boston. Dear Mr. Rosenwald. 1st ed. New York: Scholastic Press, 2006. Print.

Wilson, Louis Round. County Library Service in the South; a Study of the Rosenwald County Library Demonstration,. The University of Chicago Press, 1935. Print.

 

New @the SCL, Part 3: religious studies

As we conclude our tripartite series highlighting new arrivals currently up on display at the Stone Center Library, today’s list should especially appeal to religious scholars. Click on the links below for more information on each title, including summaries and current availability, or check out our previous posts in this series here and here.

Happy reading! Our display changes regularly, so be sure to come on by and check out what’s new @the SCL.

New @the SCL, Part 2: issues in education

Last week, we posted a partial listing of new books currently on display here at the Library. Today, we continue with a quick posting on new arrivals covering a wide range of topics in education – in the U.S. and abroad, secondary and post-secondary pedagogy and experiences, and other recent research.

Check out what’s new @the SCL, part 2:

Enjoy! And don’t forget to stay tuned for next week’s final installment, featuring new acquisitions on a variety of topics related to religious studies.

New @the SCL, Part 1: genealogy, trans-racial adoption, and more!

Have you seen our latest display?

New books on display at the Stone Center Library

Featuring titles newly available here at the Stone Center Library, current highlights include topics such as religion, genealogy, education, women’s studies and more. We encourage you to come on by and check them out, and will be introducing these titles in a weekly three-part series, starting today with a variety of resources pertaining to family:

Coming up next week: new titles in education studies.

SCL Pick for Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month 2012: “Interracial Encounters”

Did you know that May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month? This celebration was established in 1978, and recognizes the contributions of Asian and Pacific Islanders in the United States. “The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869.” (Source: http://asianpacificheritage.gov/about.html)

With this in mind, today’s SCL Pick is the newly-acquired Interracial Encounters : Reciprocal Representations in African American and Asian American Literatures, 1896-1937. Written by Julia H. Lee (2011, New York University Press), this book “explores the diverse ways in which Asian American and African American texts represented racial relations and racial others in an era dominated by a national racial philosophy that presumed, as W.E.B. Du Bois put it, the ‘high civilization of the whites, the lack of culture among the blacks, the apparent incapacity for self-rule in many non-Europeans, and the stagnation of Asia’” (Source: Syndetic Solutions).

Interested in this area of study? Come by the SCL! Today’s pick is but one of several volumes on Afro-Asian topics available here at the Library. For instance, check out last year’s selections here and here. And stay tuned for more SCL Picks this week and next, as we highlight some fabulous new titles that have recently been added to the collection. Happy reading!

SCL Picks for International Jazz Day

In addition to being National Poetry Month, did you know that April is also Jazz Appreciation Month?

“April was selected by the National Museum of American History, the originator of the tribute, because so many seminal people were born this month. The list includes Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Charles Mingus, Tito Puente and Herbie Hancock.” (Source: The Washington Post)
 

In addition, today – April 30th – also marks the inaugural observation of International Jazz Day! Whether you’ve been celebrating all month, all year, or just for today, here’s a sampling of related books available here at the SCL:

For more online resources, keep in mind the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web, which includes an ample music section under the category of “Arts.” Enjoy!

Women’s History Month Display Highlights

Have you been by the Stone Center Library lately? If so, you may have noticed our latest display, which features selections in honor of women’s history month, hand-picked by Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier.

Here are some of the highlights:

Azaransky, Sarah. The Dream Is Freedom : Pauli Murray and American Democratic Faith. Oxford ;: Oxford UP, c2011.

Blair, Cynthia M. I’ve Got to Make My Livin’ : Black Women’s Sex Work in Turn-of-the-century Chicago. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2010.

Haynes, Rosetta Renae. Radical Spiritual Motherhood : Autobiography and Empowerment in Nineteenth-century African American Women. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, c2011.

Johnson, M. Mikell. Heroines of African American Golf : The Past, the Present and the Future. [Bloomington, Ind.]: Trafford Pub., c2010.

Lau, Kimberly J. Body Language : Sisters in Shape, Black Women’s Fitness, and Feminist Identity Politics. Philadelphia, Pa.: Temple UP, 2011.

Musser, Judith. “Girl, Colored” and Other Stories : A Complete Short Fiction Anthology of African American Women Writers in the Crisis Magazine, 1910-2010. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co., c2011.

Nevergold, Barbara Seals., and Peggy Brooks-Bertram. Go, Tell Michelle : African American Women Write to the New First Lady. Albany, N.Y.: Excelsior Editions/State U of New York P, c2009.

Perkins-Valdez, Dolen. Wench : A Novel. New York: Amistad, c2010.

Shields, John C., and Eric D. Lamore. New Essays on Phillis Wheatley. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P, c2011.

Winn, Maisha T. Girl Time : Literacy, Justice, and the School-to-prison Pipeline. New York: Teachers College P, c2011.

Like what you see? Come on by for these titles and more! The Stone Center Library is open 8am-8pm Monday-Thursday and Fridays 8am-5pm. The Library is on the third floor of the Stone Center on South Rd., near the Belltower.

SCL Picks for Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month and here at the Library options abound for those of you interested in women’s studies from a variety of approaches. Perhaps you’ve read the extremely popular novel The Help, have seen the award-winning film, or both. Love it or hate it, this complex work has inspired spirited debate with regard to its portrayal of race relations. Along these lines, today we thought we would feature a couple of our holdings on motherhood and the domestic sphere in the American South. Check out:

Born southern : childbirth, motherhood, and social networks in the old South, by V. Lynn Kennedy (2010).

  • “Kennedy’s unique approach links the experiences of black and white women, examining how childbirth and motherhood created strong ties to family, community, and region for both. She also moves beyond a simple exploration of birth as a physiological event, examining the social and cultural circumstances surrounding it: family and community support networks, the beliefs and practices of local midwives, and the roles of men as fathers and professionals. . . Kennedy’s systematic and thoughtful study distinguishes southern approaches to childbirth and motherhood from northern ones, showing how slavery and rural living contributed to a particularly southern experience.” (Source: http://search.lib.unc.edu/search?R=UNCb6283703)

Cooking in other women’s kitchens : domestic workers in the South, 1865-1960, by Rebecca Sharpless (2010).

  • “Through letters, autobiography, and oral history, this book evokes African American women’s voices from slavery to the open economy, examining their lives at work and at home. Sharpless looks beyond stereotypes to introduce the real women who left their own houses and families each morning to cook in other women’s kitchens.” (Source: http://search.lib.unc.edu/search?R=UNCb6460585)

If this topic piques your interest, don’t forget we’re always happy to provide further recommendations and/or reference assistance – by phone, email, or chat (StoneCenterRef). And in case you missed it the first time, here’s our Women’s History Month Round-Up of previous SCL blog entries and online resources in women’s studies, including the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web.

Next up on the SCL blog: Have you come by the Library lately? Make sure you check out our latest display, featuring hand-picked selections by Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier for Women’s History Month. Stay tuned!