Category Archives: Politics

2015 UNC-CH African American History Month lecture – Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad

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Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad will deliver the 11th Annual African American History Month Lecture on February 17, 2015, in the Sonja Haynes Stone Center Auditorium.

In addition to being the Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Research and a sought-after speaker, Dr. Muhammad has published extensively, including his book The Condemnation of Blackness: race, crime, and the making of modern urban America, and several articles. Links to published articles, audio, and video interviews are included below.

ARTICLES
Muhammad, Khalil G. “White may be might, but it’s Not always Right.” The Washington Post Dec 09 2007. ProQuest. Web. 14 Jan. 2015.
Muhammad, Khalil G. “”Negro Stranger in our Midst”: Origins of African American Criminality in the Urban North, 1900–1940.” Order No. 3117624 Rutgers The State University of New Jersey – New Brunswick, 2004. Ann Arbor: ProQuest. Web. 14 Jan. 2015.
Muhammad, Khalil Gibran. “Where did all the White Criminals Go? Reconfiguring Race and Crime on the Road to Mass Incarceration.” Souls 13.1 (2011): 72-90. ProQuest. 14 Jan. 2015.
Muhammad, Khalil G. “Playing the Violence Card.” New York Times Apr 06 2012, Late Edition (East Coast) ed. ProQuest. 14 Jan. 2015.

VIDEO INTERVIEWS
Tavis Smiley Interview: Incoming director of the city’s famed Schomburg Center
The Root Interview: The Schomburg’s Khalil Gibran Muhammad
New York Times: Historian Will Direct Schomburg Center in Harlem
Moyers and Company: Confronting the Contradictions of America’s Past Jun 29 2012 (Video

AUDIO INTERVIEWS
Lake Effect’s Mitch Teich interviews author Khalil Gibran Muhammad on his book “The Condemnation of Blackness.”

 

IAAR Brown Bag – “Brazilian Quilombos: Historical & Contemporary Struggles”

The UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of African American Research (IAAR) will be holding the first in their spring 2015 series of brown bag lectures –  “Brazilian Quilombos: Historical & Contemporary Struggles” presented by Adam Bledsoe, UNC-CH Department of Geography – on January 12, 2015 at 12:00pm in Room 309C of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center.

The Stone Center Library staff has prepared a bibliography to accompany this lecture, the PDF of which can be found here.

 

New @the SCL, Part 3: Hot Topics!

Today we close out our tripartite series on new books on display here at the Library with selections covering a range of hot topics: gender, religion, hip-hop, sex work, HBCUs, marriage, and more. To read more about each title, click the links below!

The Black Mega-Church: Theology, Gender, and the Politics of Public Engagement (Tamelyn N. Tucker-Worgs)

I Believe I’ll Testify: The Art of African American Preaching (Cleophus J. LaRue)

Wake Up: Hip-Hop Christianity and the Black Church (Cheryl Kirk-Duggan & Marlon Hall)

Masculinity in the Black Imagination: Politics of Communicating Race and Manhood (Edited by Ronald L. Jackson and Mark C. Hopson)

Novel Bondage: Slavery, Marriage, and Freedom in Nineteenth-century America (Tess Chakkalakal)

Is Marriage for White People? How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone (Ralph Richard Banks)

Keepin’ It Hushed: The Barbership and African American Hush Harbor Rhetoric (Vorris L. Nunley)

I’ve Got to Make My Livin’: Black Women’s Sex Work in Turn-of-the-Century Chicago (Cynthia M. Blair)

America’s Historically Black Colleges & Universities: A Narrative history, 1837-2009 (Bobby L. Lovett)

In case you missed it, Parts 1 and 2 are available here and here. For those of you in the throes of classes and possibly starting to contemplate research projects, we hope these posts have given you some ideas. As always, our chat reference buddy name is StoneCenterRef, and Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier (shauna[dot]collier[at]unc[dot]edu) is happy to take your reference questions. 

Happy Friday, y’all, and have a great weekend!

New @the SCL, Part 1: Literature & Literary Studies!

If you’ve been by the Stone Center Library lately, you may have noticed some great new books on display. If not, here’s the first of three posts highlighting some recent acquisitions in literature and literary studies available here at the SCL:

Juice: a Novel (Ishmael Reed)

Cross-Cultural Visions in African American Literature: West meets East (Edited by Yoshinobu Hakutani)

Salvage the Bones: A Novel (Jesmyn Ward) — 2011 National Book Award winner!

Authentic Blackness / Real Blackness: Essays on the Meaning of Blackness in Literature and Culture (edited by Martin Japtok and Jerry Rafiki Jenkins)

Conversations with Walter Mosley (Edited by Owen E. Brady)

Wench: a Novel (Dolen Perkins-Valdez)

The Indignant Generation: A Narrative History of African American Writers and Critics, 1934-1960

The Routledge Companion to Anglophone Caribbean Literature (Edited by Michael A. Bucknor and Alison Donnell)

“Girl, Colored” and Other Stories: A Complete Short Fiction Anthology of African American Women Writers in The Crisis Magazine, 1910-2010 (Edited by Judith Musser)

Stay tuned for more new titles in dance, religion, politics, and more!

Black History Month Profile: James Weldon Johnson (1831-1938)

First performed publicly in February of 1900, “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing,” was composed by brothers James Weldon (text) and J. Rosamand Johnson (music). Originally conceived as a poem to commemorate Lincoln’s birthday, “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing” as a musical work has become a powerful symbol of the U.S. Civil Rights movement. Termed “the Black National Anthem” by some, this song also inspired a short-lived sculpture (“The Harp”) commissioned for the 1939 New York World’s Fair and created by Augusta Savage Jefferson. Given its cultural significance, and in honor of Black History Month, here at the Library we thought we would briefly spotlight the poet, educator, and activist behind the poem: James Weldon Johnson.

James Weldon Johnson (1831-1938) was born in Jacksonville, FL and went on to attend Atlanta University. The son of a schoolteacher, he returned to his alma mater Stanton Elementary School as principal. Concurrently, he purused legal studies and became the first African-American to pass the bar exam in the state of Florida. In addition to his significant contribution to the fields of education and law, Johnson was a prolific writer of poems, song texts, and fiction such as The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man. Active in the political arena as well, in 1920 he was appointed executive secretary of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), which ultimately adopted “Lift Every Voice and Sing” as its official song.

For a sampling James Weldon Johnson’s poetry available here at the Library, we recommend checking out:

For more on the artwork inspired by “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” consider this book, also available here at the Library:

And for a full list of books authored by James Weldon Johnson and available here at the SCL, check out the following list in the online catalog. Happy reading!

Sources consulted:

SCL Picks: MLK Day Edition!

Happy MLK Day, everyone! In commemoration of this day of service and reflection, here’s a quick list of recent books related to the path-breaking Martin Luther King Jr. All titles are available here at the Stone Center Library and we encourage you to come by and check them out!

All Labor Has Dignity: “An unprecedented and timely collection of Dr. King’s speeches on labor rights and economic justice”

Behind the dream : the making of the speech that transformed a nation: “a thrilling, behind-the-scenes account of the weeks leading up to the great event, as told by Clarence Jones, a co-writer of the speech and close confidant to King himself.”

Burial for a King : Martin Luther King Jr.’s funeral and the week that transformed Atlanta and rocked the nation: “Compelling and original, Burial for a King captures a defining moment in America’s history. It encapsulates King’s legacy, America’s shifting attitude toward race, and the emergence of Atlanta as a new kind of Southern city.”

Interested in U.S. Civil Rights more generally? Check out these recent SCL acquisitions:

For even more resources available here at the Library, take a look at last year’s MLK Day post, as well as the Civil Rights section of the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web. Happy reading!

NEW SCL DISPLAY!

Have you been by the Stone Center Library lately? If so, you’ve hopefully noticed our new display:

Our latest selection of recently acquired books features titles related to African Americans in American culture, in keeping with our recent event with UNC history professor “Fitz” Brundage:

All titles are available here at the library and we encourage you to come by and check them out. Happy reading, and have a great weekend!

TODAY at 5:00pm in Wilson: Beyond Blackface booktalk… plus related UNC resources

We hope you’re all excited for TODAY’S book talk with UNC history professor “Fitz” Brundage, as he discusses his latest book, Beyond Blackface: African Americans and the Creation of American Popular Culture, 1890-1930 (UNC Press 2011).

Event details (also available on Facebook):

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5:00pm Reception | Main Lobby, Wilson Library

5:30pm Program | Pleasants Family Assembly Room

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Free and open to the public

In anticipation of this event, Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier has put together a list of related books available at UNC libraries. Check it out!

Happy reading, and we hope to see you TODAY at 5pm in Wilson Library!

Save the date: Tuesday, Nov. 1st @5pm, African Americans and the Creation of American Popular Culture

Save the date! On Tuesday, November 1st, UNC history professor Fitzhugh Brundage will deliver a lecture on the history of African Americans in American popular culture. The talk will will take place at 5:30pm in the Wilson Special Collections Library, with a reception at 5:00pm. This event is FREE  and open to the PUBLIC

Brundage is the editor of the UNC Press book Beyond Blackface: African Americans and the Creation of American Popular Culture, 1890-1930, a collection of essays from sixteen scholars in various disciplines that “address the complex roles of black performers, entrepreneurs, and consumers in American mass culture during the early twentieth century.” This book is currently available at Davis Library and the North Carolina Collection (library use only) – check for availability here.

Brundage is also the William Umstead Distinguished Professor of history at UNC, and his books include The Southern Past : A Clash of Race and Memory(2005), A Socialist Utopia in the New South: The Ruskin Colonies in Tennessee and Georgia, 1894-1901 (1996) and Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930.  (1993) 

In 2006, he was awarded the Lillian Smith Award from the Southern Regional Council and the Southern Historical Association’s Charles S. Sydnor Award for a distinguished book in southern history for The Southern Past: A Clash of Race and Memory.

This event is sponsored by the Friends of the Library and the Stone Center Library for Black Culture & History. For more information, contact: Liza TerllFriends of the Library at (919) 962-4207 or liza_terll@unc.edu.

Hope to see you there!  


Opening TODAY @7pm: “The Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs and Germany”

Opening TONIGHT at the Stone Center, this event is FREE and OPEN to the PUBLIC:

“The Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs and Germany” exhibition will open at the Robert and Sallie Brown Gallery and Museum, Thursday, September 8, at 7pm.

“The exhibition, on display thru October 28, features photos, cartoons and political posters that tell an intriguing story of how American and German history became intertwined in the struggle for civil rights.

The exhibition was curated by Maria Hoehn, Professor of History at Vassar College and Dr. Martin Klimke, Research Fellow at the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C.  This project expands the boundaries of the African American Freedom Struggle beyond the U.S. and depicts African American GIs as active participants in the victory over Nazism, the democratization of Germany after WWII, and in the advancement of civil rights in their own country and beyond.

The opening reception is set for 7pm on September 8 and is free and open to the public.   Professor Maria Hoehn will give a brief presentation at the reception.  Local representatives from the National Association of Black Veterans, Tuskegee Airmen, Montford Point Marines, and Buffalo Soldiers will attend the reception as special guests.”

More details about this exhibit are available HERE.

Interested in learning more? Come by the Stone Center Library and check out our latest display of related books. For example: